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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Please forgive...

Here is the link to my Picasa Album..
Walther PPK

Here is the Story...

Time: 1944
Place: Somewhere Across France
Mission: "Breakout" (* I believe after looking this up it is the Breakout of Normandy *)

Sgt. Wm L. Ferguson of Battery "A" of the 60th Field Artillery, 9th Division was on patrol and noticed a reflective flash in the bushes about 50 yards away. He instructed his accompanying BOFORS, 30mm guns to target the flash vicinity.
As soon as the gun barrels were in place, 35 German SS troopers, hands raised, surrendered on the spot. The Troopers were searched and were thought to have been relieved of their weapons.
One SS Sergeant walked over and offered his 7.65 Walther that had been missed.
Thats the Gun my Mother has now and frankly I played with weekly growing up.

My Grandpa had also collected other odds and ends, Helmet, Belt, NAZI Flag, boots and such at random points during the War. Most, if not all of those things are in some army museum on the East coast. I wish I knew where.
I'm told, I will get this gun, some day..

One last thing..

Why I'm so interested...

As I said.. I know your not suppose to play with guns...But Who here can tell me
they didn't..........


I handled, unloaded...and played with this gun for many years..
I thought I knew every inch of it. The original story for this gun was...

Grandpa took if off a "kraut" that no longer had use of it.. Even my Mom didn't know the real story till I forced her to ask him. He is 87 and I really wanted to be sure we knew the facts. He is in good health, but the Sergent Major has been retired for as long as I have been alive, with 30 years served.

Anyway........ I seem to remember more markings on the "gun", that I don't see on it now. I'm not saying I think someone switched it, but that possibility exists. Mom told me she wrote down the Serial numbers and they match, but it seems all to strange that someone could have suggested she write them down, after the swap was done.

I pray I'm wrong.... but if I can get the history of these serial numbers and they match the date / time of my Grandpa's story, then I'm happy.

Thanks for reading..
I know there is a "book" or two out there, but I wanted these pictures in time for the Gunshow as well. Just need one or two people that know these guns to take a gander and confirm or deny...

V.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
No offense intended with the "original" story. Those words were what I heard growing up..
With out thinking much of the potential audience, I typed this out. Any help is much appreciated.

I tried to Edit and replace it with Soldier, but I can't edit my own posts.

Humbly,

V.
 

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Well, it's a PP, not a PPK, but otherwise it's from the right period, c.1944, among the last wartime ones made. If there are any proof or acceptance marks on it, however, I can't make them out in the photos.

M
 

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After reflecting on it a bit, it occurred to me that your impression that the gun was a PPK and your recollection that it had "more markings" on it might together suggest that your father brought back two Walthers, not just one. The PP in your photos is a very late wartime gun, and missing the Walther inscriptions that normally covers the left side of the slide; it also appears to lack any proof or acceptance marks, so it might not have been manufactured in time to have been captured in the breakout from Normandy in 1944.

A PPK made earlier, however, would have had the profuse markings you remember. Just a thought...

M
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
After reflecting on it a bit, it occurred to me that your impression that the gun was a PPK and your recollection that it had "more markings" on it might together suggest that your father brought back two Walthers, not just one. The PP in your photos is a very late wartime gun, and missing the Walther inscriptions that normally covers the left side of the slide; it also appears to lack any proof or acceptance marks, so it might not have been manufactured in time to have been captured in the breakout from Normandy in 1944.

A PPK made earlier, however, would have had the profuse markings you remember. Just a thought...

M
Yep, there is more then what meets the eye..

it was My grandpa who brought back the gun and further the dates are not matching.
I always "thought" it was a ppk so that could just be me not knowing..
What has me in a dilemma is the gun she has... is placed in a time frame a year later then my Grandpa told her. further, with the common knowledge of the Walther plant takeover and Serial numbers from that event, I am about positive what I have is around April 1945. As my Grandpa was in France in the "breakout" of Normandy in 1944, this gun, is NOT the gun I remember. Now my problem is ..

What I tell my Mother, or even if I tell her. I guess I'm holding out hope for is that my Step-father, who is still living in her house, either HAS or knows who has "THE" gun.

Wow.. I'm just beside my self.

v.
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I can't help you with dating and marks, but when I read the history of it's capture, my eyes lit up when I read 9th division. That is the unit I served with in Viet Nam. In your Grandpa's day it was named "Varsity". In Nam is was the Old Reliables. I was in C Company, 2nd Battalion, 60th Infantry. :)

Dep
Sir!

I salute you..

v.
 
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