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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey, Fellas,

I had mentioned back in 2012 when I joined the Forum that my late Grandfather had brought back a WWII P-38 from occupied Germany immediately following the war. I'm pasting in a quote from my New Member posting at that time:


I have a WWII P-38 (AC 41) which my grandfather brought back from Germany at the end of WWII. And no, it was not taken from a dead German officer (saw that on an earlier post ), but was acquired and/or purchased by Grandpa Joe while he was a member of the Scientific Observer mission sent over to benefit from German advances in technology. It came in a hard shell luger holster rather than a P-38 holster and has one matching magazine. He wasn't a gun guy and so gave it to my father, but to the end of his days swore it had been a luger...




Well, I dug out the old P08 holster and was looking at it, and was surprised to see that it seems to have been made in 1911 (B. Wiedermann, Berlin N.39), and has a number of additional markings on it that I am unable to recognize or identify. I'm hoping someone here will have some ideas or suggestions about deciphering some of these markings.

















Aside from the "B. Wiedermann, Berlin N.39" and "1911" stamps on the inside flap (and my father's initials which are up and to the left in the photos), there are two ink stamps which I'm hoping might look familiar to any Luger collectors out there. One is an ink stamp to the right of the loading tool pouch, and appears to read "B.A.G. 1911" or possibly "1921". The second is a larger rectangular ink stamp, above the loading tool pouch, and which is hard to read. In the center it looks (to me) like xxxx "SV ss" xxxx. The left side and right side characters of this stamp are not very legible to me, so I just put a bunch of x's to represent them. I guess it's possible that I'm reading it upside down, also.


I'm hoping someone has seen something like this markings before, and/or can suggest where I should post them to seek help in identifying them. The holster looks black but with a brownish tinge which makes me think it was probably re-dyed at some point. The holster has some bulges where the front of the slide and front sight pushed on the leather, as well as an indentation on the holster flap where the spur hammer rode. It's still fairly supple, all things considered.


My grandfather was given the rank of Colonel or Lieutenant Colonel in the Scientific Observer mission, and picked the Walther up as a souvenir for my Dad. I inherited it when my father passed away. I still have my Grandad's uniform with Ike jacket, as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
OK. I know the chances are not good that anybody will recognize these stamps. The larger ink stamp is hard for me to read, and I can hold it in my hands and view it from various angles. I'm hoping to find someone that these markings look familiar to.

I'll try posting this also on a Luger forum. And, just to put it out there, this is not some kind of scam, and I'm not looking to sell anything. I hope nobody thinks that.

My next question would be, am I the only person who has ever seen (or has) a WWII bring-back P-38 which came home in a Luger holster? My Grandfather passed away 15 years ago, and I never asked him where he got it in Germany, or how. I have to think he bought it, or bartered for it. In any case, he legitimately swore up and down that it had been a Luger. I even tried telling him, "You know, Grandpa, a Walther P-38 is actually a better pistol than a Luger, that's why they replaced them." Still, he was firm in his belief that the pistol he had brought home for my Dad was a Luger.
 

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The 4" Luger and P-38 are so close in size and shape that many holsters will accommodate either. Bianchi even used to offer an older scabbard called the "88" that fit them both, I believe. It would not be uncommon to find either in the other's holster, especially after the war when weapons had been gathered, and often offered to G.I.'s as souvenirs at their return to the States. I'm sure it was similar in some places in Europe, but my dad was in Japan and was told to take his pick of confiscated weapons from piles of rifles and swords on the ground. I'm sure pistols in the Pacific were not as prolific as those in the European Theater.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
That makes sense. It also occurred to me that he could have gotten it from a GI who had it stored in a U.S. holster, or wrapped in a rag in a rucksack, and maybe it was necessary to obtain a holster separately. Plus, my grandfather genuinely believed it to be a Luger. Maybe he asked for the wrong holster. I wish I had asked him about that.

It obviously had been used and fired with corrosive ammo, at some point, without cleaning, as it came to my father with a lightly pitted bore, and was a little worn. My Dad treasured it and always kept it clean and lightly oiled.

I went ahead and uploaded the photos directly.

2 more to follow.
 

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