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what are the pitfalls to look out for if your buying older PPKs especially those that are over 75 years old. Obviously something that old and has seen years isn’t going to be perfect but also curious what I should be looking for
 

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If you don't know a lot about Walther PPK's then begin reading up right here while you keep your eyes open. Look at the FAQ section up top also. PPK pistols usually sell for a couple of hundred more than PP or PPK/S. The very early pistols were made in the Zella Mehlis factory from '29 to '45. Those generally bring the most money and condition is a driving factor.

Next come the postwar European pistols...these include the French made Manurhin models ( read FAQ up top for explanation of what this is all about), and Ulm, Germany pistols

Due to the Gun Control Act of 1968 no more PPK pistols could be imported into the U.S. The PPK was "replaced" if that can be done with the PPK/S. Interarms/Ranger produced a number in Alabama, then Smith and Wesson manufactured a number and now the new U.S. Walther/Umarex factor in Ft Smith Arkansas is producing them.

But for the old ones, look at the overall condition. Rotating the safety from fire to safe should trip the hammer as the front edge of the lever begins to cross the red dot. Make sure all the parts are there....including ejector, ejector spring, etc. Cycle the slide, drop the hammer against your thumb, pull the front of the trigger guard down and remove the slide so the inner parts can be inspected. If they won't let you, ask them to do it for you. This is very reasonable, no parts will fly away. Check the bore, it should be shiny and in good shape. You can aid your eyesight by placing a small piece of white paper at the chamber end to light up the bore. Check the grips for cracks. Those old ones can crack. Aftermarket variations are available. Sights, hammer, how many magazines...do they look damaged? Do they lock in properly. Condition of blueing. If you spend some time here ahead of time you will soon get a good idea of price range. The older and the better the condition....the more they cost. The box is came in adds to the value. The pistol will come in .22, .32 and .380 or 9mm kurz. I can't remember if there ever was a .25 model. I'm old. The pistol was designed for .32 cal ammo originally. Old mags are hard to find and are expensive.

I'd guess a PPK from Zella Mehlis (ZM) would be in the $1,400 and up, possibly way up, depending on condition and other features.. The post war pistols might be found for $600 to $2,000 or so. Don't drive up to the gun shop in your Bentley...makes bargaining hard. Believe it or not.....some of these old pistols can still look and shoot like new. I'm sure others will have info to add. Shoot it if they have a place for you to do so and will allow you to. Most places don't if it is a local gun shop or you have found one on-line at a place like Simpson's Ltd. Good luck. A Member here said he saw one for sale in Dallas for $450 a couple of months ago....but, he had to think about it. There wouldn't have been a lot of thinking for a lot of us. 1917
 

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When an empty magazine is inserted and locked in the pistol the slide should lock rearward when you cycle it. The left, front edge of the follower engages the ejector and lifts it to block forward movement. Or at least it should. If you lower the mag or remove it a small rearward pull of the slide will allow the ejector to drop freeing the slide to fully close. Check that while you are inspecting one. 1917
 
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