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If S&W/Walther offered a limited editon (1,000 guns) James Bond 007 version of the PPK, would you buy one? Or at least really want one?

Let's say it's the standard PPK as made today, in your choice of either blue or stainless, .32 or .380 calibers.

It has this logo on nicely engraved on the slide:



And a version of this logo also nicely engraved on the slide:



Price would be right around $995 suggested retail.

Omega has made two James Bond 007 limited edition watches that sold out almost instantly at prices more than $3,000:



Imagine the limited edition Bond PPK. I want one! What about you?
 

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In my cynical old age I have a really hard time getting excited over such a thing. Why would I want to spend $1,000 to act out a fantasy? If one is so inclined, masturbation is cheaper.

Actually, there is a practical problem. "James Bond", the stylized "007", and associated images are trademarked by the filmmakers. In their infinite hypocrisy, they abhor the thought of licensing them for use on guns that can ACTUALLY HURT people. Many years ago an attempt was made by Interarms to obtain a license to use still photos and studio art in advertising for the Walther P5. The answer was not just no, but HELL NO.

Some years later, Umarex (which by then had acquired Walther) tried to present a cased, specially inscribed P99, complete with a fake silencer, to Pierce Brosnan. The rig was duly forwarded to Hollywood, but the splash made few if any ripples.

M
 

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If I were interested, it would have to be an exact duplication, which I doubt S&W could do. If you ever get the chance try to hold a LNIB PPK from the 60's in your hand. The workmanship and detail are awsome. It always chokes me up to watch an old Bond movie and see how flipantly 007 discards his ppks and then pulls a new one out of the glove box or gets a new one from Q. I am a true ppk nerd:D .
 

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Hell YEAH I'd buy one!!! But it would have to sell for a LOT LESS than $995. As far as I'm concerned the PPK is already way to pricey at a retail of $556. I would maybe pay $700 for one. I have no doubt the licensing problems could be overcome. But the cost of getting the licensing might raise the price back up to $1000, and that's just too much for a gun that would be a safe queen. Plus NO STAINESS! Bond never carried a stainless PPK, and making a "commemorative" pistol like this just wouldn't work in stainless. It's an interesting idea. BTW...the Omega watches are NOT sold out. They are available for around $3650.

http://www.shopping.com/xPO-Omega-Omega-Limited-James-Bond-007-Mens-Watch-2226-80



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The California Roster of Aprroved handuns includes a PPK in .380 with a blue finish. No mention of a .32 though. Still, I don't think I have even seen a blue .380 S&W?
 

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PanaDP;37479... yeah they would. That would be a super fun plinker! They could probably build it with a double stack mag and have it hold 15 or 20 said:
Sure, that will be Umarex's next project after they learn how to properly make a P22.

The difficulty is that making a PPK in .22 is not as simple as drilling a smaller hole in the barrel. The .22 needs a completely different slide and associated parts from the .380 --firing pin, safety, extractor, ejector, etc. and a much different magazine. If it were a faithful reproduction the pistol would have to sell for about twice the price of a P22, and the sales history doesn't support such an investment. Back in the '60s and '70s when PP, PPK and PPK/s pistols were available in .22, only one out of every ten sold was a .22.

As far as double-column magazines are concerned, forget it. There has never been a successful double-column magazine in .22 rimfire. With its rimmed case and blunt soft lead bullet, it's a big enough problem just trying to get a single-column mag to feed reliably. It was for that reason that Bill Ruger tasked Harry Sefried to design what became Ruger's 10-shot rotary magazine. Harry solved the problem of magazine lips that were difficult to accurately form and prone to distortion by using a rigid investment-cast feed block.
 
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