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Bought this gun just before Christmas. Took it straight out of box to range. Gun FTF (slide stuck back and have to manually rack the slide back forward) on the second round and then every other round for first mag. Shooting 147 grain. Switched ammo to 115 gr and FTF about once per mag for next 50 rounds. Switched ammo to different brand 115gr. And continued to have FTF about once per mag for next 100 rounds. Was so frustrated with the gun at this point left the range.

Painstakingly disassembled gun when getting home. Gun was filthy inside as many others have complained about. Cleaned it all up and lightly oiled. I was really hoping this would help.

Shot this gun two days ago and FTF problem seemed a little better, happened 2 times in 50 rounds. Then shot it again yesterday and second shot FTF followed by a FTE. After clearing that gun wouldn't shoot at all when pressing the trigger. After unloading and reloading shot another mag through it without issue but I am really really disappointed in this gun and feel like it doesn't work more than it does...

Read through others postings here to see who else is having problems and while there are some, none seem to be having them as frequent as mine. Do you guys suggest sending this to Walter (how does this process work?) or fixing something myself or just plain selling this gun?
 

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The CCP shouldn't be as susceptible to limp wrist issue as a conventional recoil cycled gun. I seriously doubt that's the issue.

I handle a CCP for the first time last night and I have to day, it was quite underwhelming.

Except for the slide being easier to rack, the PPS beats this gun in all areas imo.
 

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Sorry FTF=failure to feed

I doubt "limp wrist" is the problem due to the fact that I've had no problems shooting our other two handguns (ppq, ruger) or any number of handguns I've shot recently owned by others. Also two others have shot it and had the same result.

I'm going to do as the first poster suggested and Contact walther.
 

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FTF as in failure to fire or failure to feed?
By merely adding one more letter to the abbreviation we could end this confusion from which I also suffer. How about FTFi and FTFe? The meaning is immediately known.
 

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The CCP shouldn't be as susceptible to limp wrist issue as a conventional recoil cycled gun. I seriously doubt that's the issue.
I respectfully disagree. The CCP does have recoil deduction, but it does have recoil nonetheless. If you shot one alone without another 9mm at hand I doubt your pre-shooting perception would meet your experience as without a comparison gun recoil at hand at the time you shoot the CCP most shooters would not be able to discern the difference offhand. The CCP like other models still need enough momentum to operate the slide and pistol, which is where ‘limp-wrist’ or ‘non-supportive grip’ as I like to think of it, comes into play.

I think from my experience that limp-wrist shooters are more likely to also be ‘Flinchers’ as both of these phenomenon’s are related as they are more psychological than physical in most cases; based on anticipatory fear. When training rookies who would flinch I would take my S&W 17 in .22 caliber and remove one shell; although at that time our issued gun was the legendary S&W model19 in .357 magnum. When that flinching student got to the empty chamber, even with the diminutive .22, he or she would flinch when the gun sounded off a deafening “CLICK” and no boom! I believe limp-wristers are of the same cloth.

Today, when taking folks out to train them, and I see these issues, I strongly recommend going to a revolver, at least long enough to become very experienced at shooting, which may diminish the fears of shooting, the muzzle blast, recoil, and the brutal physicality … a shock to video gamers as well ... thus the flinch and limp-wrist tendency … then again they may not. There is nothing wrong with using a firearm that works for you instead of trying to keep up with current trends and look cool like they see in the movies; semi-autos are not for everyone. When my department went to semi-autos we could have kept our model 19—grandfather clause, but I decided to go new, and after a few months I would have went back to my model 19 for the rest of my career in a heartbeat and did try, but NO, once you switched you were stuck. There is no shame in being smart, use what works until you are good enough to know the difference and stick with it.

This response is for general information and not pointed at any one person here in any way.
 

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By merely adding one more letter to the abbreviation we could end this confusion from which I also suffer. How about FTFi and FTFe? The meaning is immediately known.
Good idea! Or, since it's a failure to load a round just make it FTL (load) and FTF (fire).
 

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FT

There are 4 different categories of Failures that I use, but I have to spell them out while keeping track of my misfires.

Failure to Fire (FTF)
Failure to Load/Feed/Chamber (FTLoad)
Failure to Lock (Slide after last round in magazine) (FTLock)
Stove Pipe (SP)

In two trips to the range with my one week old Walther CCP I have shot 372 rounds of 6 different brands of ammo, 115 and 124 gran, flat nose and FMJ. I still average a FT Load every 10 rounds or less, and 1 FT Lock about every 20 rounds. Hugely disappointing. It should be broke in by this time.

I have never had a failure of any kind in my PPQ and PPS in over 400 rounds each.

The CCP just feels so good though, handles nice, great weight for carry, extremely accurate and carries 8+. Sure hopes it comes around. Won't carry it until it does.
 

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Ggreeson--

Thanks for the info.

Did you not try jhp? The feeding problems I've encountered were limited to jhp (though I did get a few stovepipes with fmj)?
 

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Maybe like many 1911's, it needs some caressing from a good gunsmith to turn it into a fighting tool.
 

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Good idea! Or, since it's a failure to load a round just make it FTL (load) and FTF (fire).
Yeah, that might work. Only thing I can think of against it is that FTL (load) might set somebody to think that it's mag connected, whereas FTFe leads you right to the chambering... I think! :confused:
 

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To try to cover all questions asked, let me just say again -

I fired the CCP right out of the box after field stripping it, cleaning it and oil/lubricating the pistol.

No work was done to the breech on the CCP, nor the PPQ and PPS.

As stated, I used only 6 brands of FMJ and FMJ flat nose cartridges in 115 grain and 124 grain. I use these kind of bullets when breaking the gun in and avoid hollow points unless I encounter no problems whatsoever.

To me a FTFeed and FTLoad would be the same thing. Anyway, the bullets do not move from the magazine to the chamber.

The magazines were brand new, right out of the box and I could not see anything wrong with them. The second time firing I did use the second magazine. Next time I will alternate magazines.

I think the next time I fire I will use FMJ 115 grain reloads at a high powder load, but under maximum load a step or two.

Really want this pistol to make the conceal carry grade.
 

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No work was done to the breech on the CCP, nor the PPQ and PPS.
There's your problem. Get out a hammer and chisel and get to work on that chamber. There are a number of examples here of how Walther corrects feeding.

So when you guys say fails to feed...that is one thing...but exactly how? Does the slide fail to strip the round from the magazine and just come to a stop, does the nose of the round stand straight up, jump out of the pistol, jam into the feed ramp, left, top or right side of the chamber.

Obviously someone is whacking on these pistols for a reason.. Their workmanship leaves a lot to be desired and appears rushed...but, for some reason most of the pistols we are seeing have had additional chiseling around the chamber entrance. Why?

Same thing for the striker channel, someone has determined that something needs fixin'. But what and why? Fail to feed, prezackly how? M1911
 

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Really want this pistol to make the conceal carry grade.
As long as it is not you, you will get it running! They are fun, accurate, and easy to tote. You won't find a 9mm easier to get repeat shots on target at speed ... repeatedly! :):D And this is a compact carry gun no less, not a duty size gun!:eek:
 

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So when you guys say fails to feed...that is one thing...but exactly how? M1911
Over 24 rounds of jhp, in four magazines; 6 in each:

The first round in two magazines failed to fully enter the chamber, after a slingshot. As I recall, the slide was perhaps 1/3" from going into battery. I do not know precisely what hung-up.

The third failure was in the middle of a magazine. It fed less. Again, I did not endeavor to determine precisely what was hanging-up, because I had not intended to engage a smith to fix a firearm that does not feed properly.

I did also have two stovepipes on fmj. I'm attaching a picture of one--they looked very similar.

I have some sense that the ammunition that resulted in the stovepipes (Priv Partizan) was underpowered. It felt like I was shooting 147 gr P through a full-size firearm.

My experience on another forum is that when someone references a firearm yielding stovepipes, someone chimes-in concerning user error. I'll provide background, and you can decide whether that seems to be the issue.

The last time I went to the range with my USP fullsize (no special features other than different sights and a different manufacturer-supplied trigger version from the one I originally acquired) and did a Bill Drill at 7 yards (some time last month) using 115 gr ammunition, I ended on a clean one at 3.08 secs (a very good performance for myself). I know that is not close to the 2 second benchmark for a GM. I've not been shooting all that long. But, if this firearm is designed so it will only work reliably if one holds a firearm so immobile that one has materially better than 0.3 second splits in a clean Bill Drill at 7 yards, this firearm would appear to be designed for a small market.
 

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Computer-age acronyms intended to describe firearms malfunctions might save time and keystrokes for some people, but they engender confusion and are seldom adequate for useful analysis.

There is merit to describing malfunctions completely, simply and accurately. These fundamental terms have been used in Army ordnance manuals for many decades.

A stoppage is any unintentional interruption in the normal cycle of operation. The most common are:

A misfire is a stoppage in which a chambered cartridge fails to fire when the trigger is pulled. This is usually a result of defective ammunition, light primer indent or broken firing pin.

A failure to feed is a stoppage in which a cartridge fails to travel from the magazine fully into the chamber.

A failure to extract is a stoppage in which a fired cartridge case is found still partly or wholly in the chamber.

A failure to eject is a stoppage in which a cartridge or fired cartridge case is extracted from the chamber but is not thrown out of the gun.

In most cases it saves time and aids the diagnosis if the stoppage is first classified in one of the major categories above. While a jam is often used colloquially to describe any stoppage in which the movement of the action is stuck and cannot be fully cycled until the blockage is cleared, the term is too general to be helpful.

Within each major category of stoppage, there are subtypes. Often these are characterized by the exact location and attitude of the cartridge or fired case when the stoppage occurs, or by the position of the bolt or slide. Their accurate identification and description aids in determining the cause and the remedy.

As examples: Among failures of eject, "stovepipe" properly applies only to those in which the fired case is caught mouth-outward in the ejection port (if it's mouth-inward, it probably has a different cause). Failures to feed include a malfunction in which the slide closes on an empty chamber. Failures to extract include a failure to pull an unfired cartridge out of the chamber when the slide is manually retracted.

Some malfunctions that may occur in the cycling of autoloaders defy easy classification into the major categories above. These include last-round holdopen failures, unintentional magazine release, doubling or slam-fires, but these are exceptions.

In general, proper classification of a malfunction--first by major category and then by sub-type if necessary-- are the first steps to understanding and curing it.

M
 
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