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In all versions of the P99 the rear of the striker protrudes through a hole in the back-plate of the slide. If the thumb is held over the hole when holstering, a rearward movement of the striker will be immediately perceptible.

Not sure what you mean by rearward movement of striker?
 

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Not sure what you mean by rearward movement of striker?
The action of cocking the striker moves it rearwards - otherwise, where else is it going to go?

On the P99 AS, when the striker is inert, i.e. not under spring tension, it is fully retracted inside the striker channel and can be seen by peering through the hole in the backplate. Pressing the trigger will move the striker rearwards until it protrudes through the hole for a short distance before being released and moving forwards towards the chamber. This rearwards movement can be clearly felt if you hold your thumb over the backplate while pressing the trigger. There are numerous videos on YouTube where this movement of the striker can be seen, as the rear of the striker normally has a blob of red paint on it.

Balor
 

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Didn’t realize the trigger shoe acted as a drop safety.

the Glock style blade style trigger safety touted as a safety against rearward travel if you got something in the sides of the trigger guard without getting fully on the face of the trigger.

It's meant to keep the corporate lawyers smiling in the board room meetings, rather than to prevent every dumbass with a string on the bottom of his jacket causing a negligent discharge by said string upon (re)holstering firearm.. ;)

It's why I don't hold a lot of weight in the assumption that manual safeties will make a gun *more* safe.

Idiots happen. Guns are expected to go "boom" when triggers are manipulated, barring bad ammo or broken guns.

It's the complacency and lack of gun etiquette that's much more dangerous than a loaded gun without a safety that's holstered with care and concern.
 

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On the P99 AS, when the striker is inert, i.e. not under spring tension, it is fully retracted inside the striker channel and can be seen by peering through the hole in the backplate. Pressing the trigger will move the striker rearwards until it protrudes through the hole for a short distance before being released and moving forwards towards the chamber. This rearwards movement can be clearly felt if you hold your thumb over the backplate while pressing the trigger.

Thanks for the response....wasn't sure which condition you were referring to....cocked or uncocked when holstering.
 

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To be clear, a cocked P99 AS (so AS or SA mode) will NOT give you rearward striker indicator movement as you pull the trigger. It's fully cocked, and all pulling the trigger does is drop the striker. It only moves if the gun is in DA mode, and then you'll see it moving from inside the channel (you can keep an eye on this while holstering, but you won't feel it much if at all before "bang" happens). You can monitor the rearward movement during trigger press on a P99QA or a PPS - on those guns, the striker indicator functions essentially like a Striker Control Device/Gadget on a Glock.

As to carrying the P99 without decocking it, why not just have a PPQ or some other gun if that's what you want to do? And as far as intentionally cocking the gun "when going into harms way" (not sure what's meant here), why would you intentionally change the condition you carry your gun in? That requires a totally separate manual of arms, i.e. you now are drawing and pressing on a light SA trigger instead of drawing and pressing through the DA trigger you're presumably used to. If you aren't comfortable with a DA first shot in all circumstances you'd use the gun in, get comfortable with it or don't carry a DA/SA gun. It's that simple.
 

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To be clear, a cocked P99 AS (so AS or SA mode) will NOT give you rearward striker indicator movement as you pull the trigger. It's fully cocked, and all pulling the trigger does is drop the striker.
Right. I wasn't sure if Balor might have been thinking about another model like the PPS which like a Glock completes the cocking motion when the trigger is pulled. His response cleared that up for me.
 

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It's meant to keep the corporate lawyers smiling in the board room meetings, rather than to prevent every dumbass ... causing a negligent discharge...
That's the common perception, but it's not really true. If you want to blame someone, blame the juries that return big-dollar verdicts for the dumbasses.

It is now a widely accepted legal principle that manufacturers have a duty to design products (including guns) that resist reasonably foreseeable misuse and abuse to the extent that the design will not impair the utility of the product. This principle is manifest in military and gun industry standards relating to preventing unintended firing, particularly in safety when a gun is dropped.

If a known hazard cannot be designed out, there is a duty to warn the user against it. It is well known that guns are frequently dropped, and it is now expected that the mechanism should survive landing impact without firing, at least from a reasonable height. What is a "reasonable" height? A jury decides. But it is not a defense to warn, "Don't drop the gun".

The reality is that practically any time someone is unintentionally shot, a law suit is threatened or commenced. The victim (if still alive) or his family want to believe it's somebody else's fault, and to be compensated for it. Like it or not, our society has become highly litigious, and believes that there is a judicial solution to every injury. In many states there is comparative negligence, so the victim can still recover even if he's partly to blame.

That gun manufacturers would rather err on the safe side of design should not be surprising; their survival depends on it.

M
 

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To be clear, a cocked P99 AS (so AS or SA mode) will NOT give you rearward striker indicator movement as you pull the trigger. It's fully cocked, and all pulling the trigger does is drop the striker.
This is precisely why I stated “..... re-holstering the P99 AS in SA mode would not be very smart”.

After firing a round, the trigger will go into SA-mode. If you are still scanning your surroundings while holstering (rather than diverting your attention to the holster), placing your thumb over the backplate while doing so will immediately reveal if the pistol is in an unsafe state. If you can feel the rear of the striker you are already in the danger zone, as the amount of trigger movement required to release the striker is minimal, and the force required (20 Newton) is even less than the PPQ (25 N) or a typical Glock (28 N).

Balor
 

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The best reason for not carrying a light trigger is when you get in situations where you feel a need pull your pistol. All things normal goes out the door. You will not hear, see, smell or fell anything at all. That is why people shoot when they do not into, because they did not feel their finger on the trigger. So the longer the trigger pull, the more time you have to stop. Remember you can not take the bullet back.
 

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Stirring it up more

Folks, I'm going to really stir it up. The only Walthers that I carry are a PPK or a PP. If I feel that I need higher capacity or 9mm, I go with my Sig. Sorry. Break into small groups and discuss, please. :)
 

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Without firing the pistol, how do you get the P99 trigger into AS mode without violating one of the top 3 rules of firearm safety? (Reminder: ALWAYS keep your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot. When holding a gun, rest your finger on the trigger guard or along the side of the gun.)

As I own a P99c AS, I'll spare you the thinking and tell you that you can't. And that, sir, is why despite loving the P99 and P99c AS, I don't carry mine as an EDC. Plainly put, I prefer light SA triggers as they reduce sympathetic muscle movements in the hand when firing (resulting in greater accuracy than with heavier trigger pulls) … but I'm not willing to intentionally handle a firearm unsafely to get a light SA trigger in an EDC when there are so many other firearm choices that don't require intentionally unsafe handling to get said same.

Good news for you. You can now again carry your P99!!


As Mode breaks no rules.



AS Mode
The AS mode is automatically engage after a round is chambered. The trigger is fully forward, as if in double action, but the striker indicator is to the rear and visible. This mode offers the safety of carrying the P99 AS in single action with a light yet long trigger pull.
 

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As Mode breaks no rules.

AS Mode
The AS mode is automatically engage after a round is chambered. The trigger is fully forward, as if in double action, but the striker indicator is to the rear and visible. This mode offers the safety of carrying the P99 AS in single action with a light yet long trigger pull.

There are rules.........and there are laws.

One law in particular was chiseled on a stone tablet and handed down by God on Mount Sinai to a bloke called...............Murphy.

Murphy descended from the mountain and showed the new law to his people, who henceforth...........didn't take a blind bit of notice.

Balor
 

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Without firing the pistol, how do you get the P99 trigger into AS mode without violating one of the top 3 rules of firearm safety? (Reminder: ALWAYS keep your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot. When holding a gun, rest your finger on the trigger guard or along the side of the gun.)

As I own a P99c AS, I'll spare you the thinking and tell you that you can't. And that, sir, is why despite loving the P99 and P99c AS, I don't carry mine as an EDC. Plainly put, I prefer light SA triggers as they reduce sympathetic muscle movements in the hand when firing (resulting in greater accuracy than with heavier trigger pulls) … but I'm not willing to intentionally handle a firearm unsafely to get a light SA trigger in an EDC when there are so many other firearm choices that don't require intentionally unsafe handling to get said same.

Oooooooooh. now I get what the whole confusion is about.


Let me run this down again: 99 system has three trigger modes. When you chamber a round, the trigger is in DA mode, medium light, medium short pull. Press the decocker, and it's in AS mode, longer, heavier pull. And that's the only two one should concern oneself with. The manual that comes with the gun, and we all read the manuals that come with guns, right? states explicitly NOT TO "cock" or "pre-stage" the trigger into SA mode as the gun does once you've fired a round.
Hence, you can carry the gun with a chambered round, decock it or not, and it's safe to carry. Don't carry it in SA mode. Which the manual says not to.
At no point in chambering a round and putting the pistol into your holster or wherever are you required or expected to pull the trigger.
 
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