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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a p5compact. I really like the size and feel, but do not like the trigger. Is there someone who "specializes" in trigger jobs on the p5c? It is too expensive to send to the local smith.
 

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I am sure that some competend gunsmith could do the trick.....
but on a P5c I would not let anybody but Earl do the job
see the link for his info
http://www.carlwalther.com/page2.htm
 

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Why would you mess with the P5 trigger ? I think it's just fine as it is. IMO the only way to "improve" the trigger is to replace (lighten) the spring - located inside the rear side - that holds the striker in its downwards position till the trigger is (almost) fully depressed , but I'm afraid this will influence the safety and reliability in a bad way. You might also consider to replace the sear's spring with a lighter one and to polish the sear's edges but before trying all this I would fully dismantle the gun, clean it well and lube the moving parts. Maybe this will already improve things for you ?:rolleyes:
 

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I concur with E.T.!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The trigger seems to have two stages. The initial pull raises the firing pin and subsequent pressure drops the hammer. It is a long pull and fairly heavy. I have dry fired it quite a bit and it might have improved, but it is still difficult to use and affects my accuracy. I do not know if it can be improved. I did speak with Earl once and he refused to do anything to change factory specs because of insurance concerns.
 

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The trigger seems to have two stages. The initial pull raises the firing pin and subsequent pressure drops the hammer. It is a long pull and fairly heavy. I have dry fired it quite a bit and it might have improved, but it is still difficult to use and affects my accuracy. I do not know if it can be improved. I did speak with Earl once and he refused to do anything to change factory specs because of insurance concerns.
Well, that's just the way the P5 operates. I agree the DA pull is long and heavy (as all DA pulls are) but I find the SA pull very much to my liking (i.e. for a properly cleaned, lubed and functioning P5). If you can't live with it I'm afraid you'll just have to look for another gun ?:rolleyes:
 

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I would be interesting if you measure the weight to pull your P5c trigger.
Mine has 4 lbs in SA and 9 lbs in DA. My PP .32 is worse with 5 lbs in SA and 12 lbs in DA!
 

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I've talked to Earl as well and he will not alter factory triggers. Fortunately I like my P5s SA just the way it is. The DA is heavy, but smooth. My only problem with the trigger on both my P5s would be the sharp edges of the trigger itself. After a couple hundred rounds the pad of my trigger finger can be pretty sensitive. I've thought about talking to earl about a trigger replacement, or modification to smooth the edges a bit. Otherwise my P5s are a couple of the most accurate guns I own. The only pistol that I can consistanly outshoot them with would be my HK P7M8, but 9 times out of 10 I have at least one P5 at the range with whatever other pistol I decide to take.
 

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Boys, you are hard on the P5... the trigger of mine is one of the best I ever found on a DA/SA design. It is comparable in weight with my Beretta 92 Compact, with a much shorter pull. In SA, of course, the stake up necessary to lift the firing pin is present but it can be mastered fast.

My only problem was the serrated trigger and its cutting edges. In my opinion, serrations are a negative gimmick on DA/SA designs. Alas all my Walthers, my P38 excepted, have them. As I shot my P5 mostly for defensive drills (DA/SA doublettes), I polished the trigger face, using a round stone fixed on the press drill. And the result is pretty good, the face will be cold blackened when I'll achieve a miror polish with other tools. But time is money and I miss both.

L.
 
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