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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings -

My 'new' 1940 commercial PP showed up, and it looks even better in person than it did in the photos.

My concern, and it's not a big one, is the corrosion that is visible through the ejection port. See photo.

I have a few questions about this.

First of all, what is this part of the gun called? I've referred to a few diagrams, but they don't specify. Obviously, it's the part of the frame/receiver that the barrel attaches to, but if it has a special name, I don't know it.

Second, while the rest of the frame is blued, this part appears to be in the white. Is that correct? Or does it have a different finish/coating?

Third, do you have any sense of what this corrosion is? Or what caused it?

Lastly, is there anything I can do about it? I have found that - generally - the answer to "can I fix the finish/blem/issue on my gun?" is usually "no, and if you try, you will regret it." But that doesn't stop me from asking. Given that this corrosion appears to be in the white, I thought maybe there might be a different answer here.

I look forward to your comments!

cheers, Richard

96219
IMG_0948.JPG
 

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You might take some molasses on put on it and remove the rust. It won’t remove the pitting but it will remove the discoloration.

To remove the pitting will require sandpaper which will also remove most if not all of the proof mark. Which appears unmolested in these pictures whereas the front and rear edges of that boss appear more rounded than I think they should.... but that may be the light.

What does the rest of the gun look like ?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You might take some molasses on put on it and remove the rust. It won’t remove the pitting but it will remove the discoloration.

To remove the pitting will require sandpaper which will also remove most if not all of the proof mark. Which appears unmolested in these pictures whereas the front and rear edges of that boss appear more rounded than I think they should.... but that may be the light.

What does the rest of the gun look like ?
It is in excellent condition. That's the only reason I'm addressing this. The other side of this structure (I still don't know what it's called) is in great shape. Only the area that appears through the ejection port has tarnished.

I'll try molasses. I'm not kidding - do you think maple syrup would work as well? I already have some in the cupboard. I'm curious about the molasses.....what does that do to the finish, or rather, I guess, how does it 'work'?

thanks for the comment
 

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molasses has some property that removes rust, It's one of those restoration tips that has been around forever. You could try maple syrup, but I have never heard it mentioned. It is from two totally different plants.

just an educated guess, but I would imagine the rest of the gun has many pits as well , they are just not obvious. Maybe I can see some in the corner of your pictures. Having stripped and refinished many guns over the years, its amazing what you can see once the blue is gone.
Just a caution, don't get it on the blued surfaces. It works slower than traditional rust
removers like naval jelly or phospheric acid , but could stain your bluing
 

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Discussion Starter #5
molasses has some property that removes rust, It's one of those restoration tips that has been around forever.
I appreciate your comments.

You seem to know a lot about this. Can you tell me: 1) what is the name of that structure where the barrel attaches? 2) is it in the white?

thanks a lot - Richard
 

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Can you tell me: 1) what is the name of that structure where the barrel attaches? 2) is it in the white?
On this forum I've seen it refered to as the barrel boss. I don't know what the Germans would call it. And it is normally in the white.

I don't think it looks too bad. I'd leave it as is.
 

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do you have any sense of what this corrosion is? Or what caused it?
The corrosion on your pistol could be from a combination of moisture from the atmosphere and salt from the sweaty person carrying it. But since this is WaltherForum we know it definitely came from the blood of the high ranking Nazi officer that it was taken from.

Maybe.

I think it looks pretty good for being 80 years old.
 

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It's part of the frame first of all. It is the boss that receives the barrel which is pressed in and pinned in place. Left, top, right sides....same part. Frame. On many PP pistols you will see scratches along the very top...new, old, doesn't matter. What has happened is that owners or others have allowed the bottom of the feed rail to drag across the top of the steel. It is easy to do if you don't lift the slide all the way up and proceed with caution. The top is easily polished with a stone or a length of emery cloth. Just use a slow shoe shine motion. How far down on the sides you polish depends on how far down you wrap the cloth. I would absolutely stay off the proof mark. Any polishing that you do will be very noticeable. You can make the top all the way to the edges look brand new.....but, how will that look with the slightly pitted right side. At one time I might have considered polishing such but not now. It is part of the pistol and I don't think it looks bad for an 80 year old firearm.

For example.



Above is the finish on a used Manurhin pistol I purchased a couple of years ago. I assume it is factory work. If so you can see that a bit of careful sanding to the top of the frame boss would not look out of place but on an older pistol this is what your work would look like. Bright and shiny....so, you have to ask yourself would this look good when you can't really do this kind of work and keep the proof mark intact. Which is why I'd clean, oil and leave it alone. It doesn't look bad. 1917
 

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Sir Recardo,

Ballistol has some propretary formula and gradually removes rust. Gradually I mean over weeks of contact.

I have used ballistol on some old mil surp mauser and patiently applied every other day or so .
No abrasion not even polymer scotch brite.
May take a while but if successful their sould be no damage to the surface or blued areas in contact.
Ballistol is good for wood blue surface and leather.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
......but on an older pistol this is what your work would look like. Bright and shiny........Which is why I'd clean, oil and leave it alone. It doesn't look bad. 1917
Thanks for the explanation and your words, 1917. I definitely see your point. I'm leaning towards doing nothing, other than soaking it in Ballistol.

thanks much -

Richard
 

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I don't have any PP pistols that are as old as yours Sir_Ricardo and I don't know exactly what the finish was like on a 1940 pistol. Did the commercial models have the same polishing marks that you see on the Manurhin pistol above.. My '92 Ranger pistol has the exact same polishing. If such polishing was correct for your pistol there is one Member here who could do it better than most. Pilkguns. Scott is a master engraver and more than a fair shot. If the top was repolished then you would have to polish the right side of the frame while carefully staying off of the proof mark. I can't tell but it almost looks like the loop might have been polished at some time in the past but with such work done along the length of the boss and not side to side. It's hard to say, especially since I don't know how a 1940 ZM pistol was finished in this area.

In any event, there would not seem to be any rush to decide what you might want to do. Using emery cloth and you have to be careful not to round off edges. Stones do a much better job of keeping edges straight. But it takes the right grit to match the original work. You would then have to devise a method and proper tool for polishing the side around the proof mark. Pilkguns could do an excellent job. I should note that I'm not suggesting that he works on other people's pistols for issues like this...just that his advice would be well worth listening to. Whether he would advise such polishing is another question. Similar quandary auto restorers find themselves in when they find an excellent vintage barn car. As they say....it's only original once.

When steel is stamped the edges of the mark are generally raised creating a rough area if you drag a fingernail across the mark. Polishing and even years of wear can remove this raised metal. One reason you might be seeing a bit of additional corrosion to this area is that it isn't blued and the steel is exposed through the ejection port. Salty finger prints, holster...who knows. 1917
 

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I am thinking.
Someone has collecitible WW2 gun, 75 years old+, a piece of history....
Why repolishing, rebluing, ceramic coating, thinning and other procedures of fake face lifting ???
Gun itself is original, everthing added is killing originallity.
I dont understand this.
 

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I would just wipe it with a rag and CLP (Clean Lube Protect) and call it good.

Nothing looks worse on a vintage firearm than an area where it's obvious someone "fixed" something.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
.......Nothing looks worse on a vintage firearm than an area where it's obvious someone "fixed" something.
.....Why repolishing, rebluing, ceramic coating, thinning and other procedures of fake face lifting ???
...I dont understand this.
Guys, first of all, thank you for your astute comments.

Second, to anyone who has lost sleep - or worse, endured nightmares - on my behalf over the imminent destruction of a vintage firearm, I would like to reassure you, I have no intention of doing ANYTHING that would mar, screw-up, modify, etc., my fine PP.

All I was asking is "is there a way to get rid of the corrosion?"

The answer - it would appear - is "possibly, if you use molasses or Ballistol" and nothing else. I totally understand that if you buff one part of a gun, it will then not match the rest of the gun. However, I had / have no intention of doing that.

So, hopefully that puts minds at ease! : )

But I'm still wondering about the corrosion. Or should I say discoloration. I am a little surprised (not totally surprised, but a little surprised) that there is not a way to remove - at least in part - the dark discoloration. Leaving the underlying metal intact, without buffing it, etc.

But I guess there is no such way.

In any case, guys, thanks for the discussion on this. I appreciate it.

cheers - Richard
 

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I have a corroded Pre War PP marked RJ. The corrosion was from sitting inside it’s holster for 74 years. It’s heartbreaking to think this did not have to happen. I will tell you though that the corrosion is the first thing people comment about. It’s like having a vintage Mercedes Benz 300SL. One sold last year for 800K. It needed complete restoration. Others in perfectly restored condition bring around a Mill. Why would someone pay so much for one in original condition needing total overhaul? Because it had never been molested .
 

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OP,

Nice find, first off. Old Walthers will always hold a place in my heart. Can look at them all day, its like when a pretty pretty redhead walks in the room. Was something else going on?? o_O:ROFLMAO:

Has anyone suggested using super fine brass wool to you?? I had an old Weaver K4 with some surface corrosion, no pitting and I gave it a little touch up with 0000 brass wool. Got that stuff taken right up, and then used some bluing to touch up the areas where the frost was. I realize you have no intention of digging into the pistol. I respect that 100%.

I am also of the mindset that outside of complete collector pieces (which I feel that many do exist), guns are machines made to be used. I came into possession of a Ruger MK2 target model with bull barrel and nice Leupold 2x scope. While the pistol had a lot of sentimental value, it had almost no collectors value. Immediately chucked up on the barrel, dialed it in dead 0's, and turned and threaded the barrel to add muzzle devices. Talk about a party.

Again, 100% respect your decision, but should you decide to dig in, try brass wool and a bit of really lightweight oil. Shouldn't even mess up the finish. The molasses tip is a really interesting, too, by the by.
 

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It's possible that something like a Penetrating Oil that breaks-down rust would also work without damage to the finish.

Recently saw a test where Liquid Wrench Penetrating Oil bested numerous other penetrants including Kroil (which happen to finish last).

I would use it on a rag only, and test it on the finish in a hidden area.
 

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I have a gallon of something made specifically for removing rust. It's at the farm. I have no idea what is in it. The public water there has a bit of rust because I have 250' of old iron pipe leading to the house. I can pour it in the toilet bowl and the rust immediately disappears. I'm going over this weekend. I will see what the active ingredient is. Might not be good for steel at all. It will be easy enough to test on a piece of something rusty.

On thing about Amazon is that there are usually a number of reviews of whatever and if some of these products are for sale there, which I'm sure they are, there will be reviews of if the stuff is actually worth anything. I had never heard of molasses before....that is a new one for me. 1917
 
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