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Maybe this has been discussed before but here goes...do most of you use the standard size backstrap that came on the P99 or have you experimented and changed sizes? I laid off a few months shooting competitively and returned the last few weeks and my grip is horrible. My thumbs are flopping everywhere...now maybe because I haven't been as deligent in practice but one guy noticed that he didn't think my weak hand was making enough contact with the gun...and this is true with the medium size backstap. Now I have a RED gun that I use for practice at the office and it is molded after a P99 with a large backstrap. With this pistol I can make better application of my weak hand to the grip....I was thinking of changing out backstraps to see if it makes any difference. I consistenly find myself pulling shots to the left...trigger pull? Maybe...but I am wondering if my grip is just not what it needs to be....any comments?
 

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I have tried them all....and went back to the medium size, then put the dermagrip over it......
 

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I like the big one. I have sort of long fingers and the other two get my fingers in each others' way. My wife is pretty small and she likes the little one.
 

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The first 200 or so rounds, i stayed with medium. The last trip to the range, i tried the small grip ... i think it's working better for me. I dont think the small grip had much difference in terms of ... well, grip - but it feels a bit more molding in the way that my hand curves.

I've also changed the front sight to the shortest post... really helped a lot to hit the point of aim.


thorn
 

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Medium for me. The big one does not feel as natural to me and the small one makes placing the pad of my finger on the trigger somewhat awkward....but maybe I'll change my mind some day.
 

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Jake ?

A very Important question ? GRIP

Your lay-off has taught you an important lesson , I think. Your Grip never was ?established? in a proper manner with your gun. You probably have been struggling [ and not knowing it ] and could even be doing quite well ? but your grip and the motor memory surrounding that function has not been properly established IMHO.

When I teach Grip and Stance ??.. I will always allow some leeway in the stance aspect, but never with the grip. I demand all students at least try it my way, while in the training program. That way I can instantly tell if their grip has changed during a Range session??.and I know they are practicing the best pistol control that I have found.

You most telling comment was about the thumbs. Believe me, it is all about the thumbs !! Some students wonder why I don?t teach a separate ?hold? for the 1911 ? where you use your thumb to ?ride? the safety. There are some definite benefits to this method when using the 1911 --- but my training is centered around making you a good shooter ?no matter what handgun you should pick up in your hands. So a ?STANDARD? grip is more appropriate in these matters.

Your strong hand or trigger finger hand ? should be concerned with only one aspect with shooting and that?s trigger control. This means that this hand should not play an overly important part in controlling the weapon. Conversely, this means that your weak-hand?s job is solely responsible for handgun control. This method pertains to a Combat two-handed grip on the weapon. We will [ for brevity sake ] ignore the single handed shot for the moment.

When gripping the weapon ??.. I ask the student to point their index finger at the target. One single finger ? with the others tucked together. Notice the position of your THUMB. It will naturally be wrapped around your longest middle finger. This POINTING is key to fast accurate shooting ????.so your grip has to also be this natural hold on your weapon. When you are holding the target at bay - your trigger finger should be where ? ?right along side the slide in this ?natural pointing ? stance.
What can be more easier than to point to where you want the bullets to go?? So take your strong hand and grip the pistol, as you would pointing at the target. Notice the thumb still wraps around the middle finger ? don?t change anything just because you have the gun in your hand.

No comes into play your weak hand and more weapon?s control. All of your fingers of the weak hand should ?cup? around the front of the pistol?s grip and on top of the fingers of your strong hand. That leaves your weak hand thumb to deal with. And this is a very important job you give this integer . It will control the tightness of your grip ? without placing any stress at all on the trigger finger hand. Now take your thumb [of the weak hand ] and place it on top of the thumb of the trigger finger hand. It should cross the thumb slightly and lock together. Now to answer your original question of your post ? choose the grip back-strap that allows for the most easiest placement of your hands described above. By placing ?DOWNWARD? pressure with your weak hand thumb, you will automatically increase the strength or hold on your handgun. You will always have a ?point touch? motor memory of where your thumbs should be at all times. After awhile, this grip will start to feel natural as you learn how to ?POINT? at the targets you want to hit.

I hope this will help you explore a possibly different way to hold your Walther ??..and give you the consistent grip that everyone needs to be accurate and fast.

JF.
 

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I've been playing with the whole grip thing lately in one handed shooting. My experiments have seemed to show that there are two very important points of contact with the grip which I had not previously appreciated enough. The first is the fingertips wrapping around the grip and hooking over so that the tips are able to exert pressure back toward the palm of the grasping hand. The second is the importance of the thumb in exerting a pressure back toward the palm. I find that for my shooting this tends to control any sideways pressure exerted by the trigger finger when pulling the trigger and allow me to fire faster with greater accuracy. Any comments on this JF?
 

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Thorn - I can't promise photos ............ but I 'll see what I can do. They require another helper and time for uploads & downloads......... and I am usually on a Range that has Strict rules about Cameras NOT being allowed, so it can't be done with the help of a student.

GPalmer - my discussion really avoided the one handed grip approach to shooting. I don't teach it in my beginners or intermediate training classes.
In self defense it has some uses ......... when you need to open doors or work with flashlights, but for the most part a draw from concealed carry is going to involve both hands on the weapon. Your weak hand is always going to be your "Sweep & Clear" device - moving clothing out of your way for a clean fast draw. In this circumstance, your weak hand is right there to assist with weapon's control after the gun clears the holster and/or body. In close combat, you always want the MOST control possible on your weapon [ search for my shooter's triangle post ] in case a struggle occurs for that weapon.

There are several methods we could argue over concerning this aspect of self-defense with a handgun - 1. Use weak hand to push off an attacker, while firing one handed. 2. Use the shooter's Triangle and blast away at the attacker trying to remove the weapon from your grasp. I teach number 2. as I have proven that even a small woman can retain the handgun from an attacker's attempts long enough to empty the magazine in an accurate manner. IMHO there are just too many kicks and moves [ taught in prison ] to remove a handgun from a single handed grasp - to take that kind of chance. Others are free to disagree.

I do agree with your analysis of the role a single finger or thumb can have with the control of your firearm. This is the reason why a "consistent" grip is so absolutely important......... as you have so rightly pointed out, it doesn't take much to have a noticable affect on your shooting.

JF.
 
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