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Discussion Starter #1
During the war, Walther parts(or weapons) were produced by prisoners of the Neuengamme concentration camp in Germany.
From 1942, several armaments companies (e.g. Messap, Jastram, and Walther-Werke) established facilities right beside the Neuengamme concentration camp.

Does someone knows which parts or weapons they made there?
 

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Not much out on the inter-webs. The most info I saw was that they produced pistols & carbines. Don't know if you found this site. You might send a message to them & get some better details. There is a lot of info available on specific pistols, so you might get a fair idea by checking the weapons that were produced between 43' and 45'. WWII. A very shocking era, to say the least.
 

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Welcome to the forum. I don't have any info. for you. But I am curious why you are interested in this particular camp. If there is a story behind your question, and you don't mind sharing it, I would love to hear it. Thanks, Ed.
 

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thanks ;)

It's a long story, but I'll keep it simple
the story goes like this:
During the war, in our small town, a collaborator (don't know if the word exists in english, but it's someone of us who was with the german's ) was murdered by members of the resistance/partisans. This collaborator was a member of a rich family. A good man, not someone who terrorised other people etc..
The ones who killed him, were unknown people from outside town.
On his funeral, his mother claimed 100 other victims.

So some time later, during 2 raids, 95 people were captured. 28 of them returned.
Most of them were deported to the camp of Neuengamme. Only 8 returned form Neuengamme.
So the people were taken prisoner just for the vengeance, so not because they were jews etc.
Some of the prisoners were members of the resistance(but they had nothing to do with the murder), but the biggest part of them was totally innocent!
One member of my family returned from Neuengamme, others died there and in other camps.
So that's why i'm interested ;)
 

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Tim:
Welcome to the forum and your story is very interesting. Do I understand that when the collaborator was killed, that his mother accused 100 people of being part of the execution of her son, the Nazi collaborator? Then the Germans arrested and imprisoned 95 people that she had accused? Was this women punished after the war? It appears that the collaborator's mother was at least as guilty as was her son. Again, Welcome.
 

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The facilities were intended by Himmler for the production of P38s, but it was decided to manufacture G43s instead from the middle of 1943. Gerhard Walther was in charge of the Walther facilities there. There is information on other forums.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Tim:
Welcome to the forum and your story is very interesting. Do I understand that when the collaborator was killed, that his mother accused 100 people of being part of the execution of her son, the Nazi collaborator? Then the Germans arrested and imprisoned 95 people that she had accused? Was this women punished after the war? It appears that the collaborator's mother was at least as guilty as was her son. Again, Welcome.
She didn't knew wo killed her son. She expected it were members of the resistance (of our town), but she didn't knew who they were ;) So she just claimed 100 victims for the dead of her son.
It was a family of collaborators. But you can't say that because they had sympathies for the german side (also begian nationalist groups), they were bad.
Because of this family, people weren't claimed to work in german factories (before things happened). The son who was killed was known as a very good man.
After the war, they moved out of town, some of them to germany. There were processes against them.

In wartime, rules are different. Don't forget that the resistance also did horrible things... Both sides do, but after a war, the winners are always the good ones. For us, it's difficult to imagine how the situations were.

But ok now I know that G43 and P38 were made in Neuengamme ;) thanks!
 

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Thanks for sharing. It is hard to imagine having to live through events like that. ED
 

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I think I read some GI reports of their being about a 1000 Polish slave laborers at the Walther plant at the time of occupation by the US Army. I have a 1944 PP, as well as a 1941 PPK (both police issue).I do wonder what badness might have been done with these pistols. But then I think that most PPs at the time probably never left their holsters in anger... If my PP was made by Poles, then my hat is off to them. It's one of the most accurate pistols I own.
 

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Hard to believe the German war factorys could get any kind of quality work out of a hostile work force. Especially the munitions factorys, I think it would be easy to load squib rounds when nobody was looking. It must have been a Quality Control nightmare.

Of course the threat of a gas chamber probably kept most in line. Ed
 

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Hard to believe the German war factorys could get any kind of quality work out of a hostile work force. Especially the munitions factorys, I think it would be easy to load squib rounds when nobody was looking. It must have been a Quality Control nightmare.

Of course the threat of a gas chamber probably kept most in line. Ed
Well the inspection stickers were put on by Germans I'm sure. As far as the polish nationals, they could always threaten their families.
 
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