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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This happened on my Q5 Steel Frame which I've had since 2018. I mounted a Trijicon SRO 2.5moa dot on the slide and have had it on there since the beginning. After roughly 25 rounds or so the glass starts getting dirty and at roughly 50 rounds the dot starts really distorting. The reason is simple. The reticle overhangs and is close to the ejection port, certainly closer than any other optic on any of the Walthers, (I dare say for most handguns). So I've been putting up with it for some time now, but during my last session, it was really annoying and everyone I shoot with noticed. The clarity of the SRO is fantastic in the beginning but then it gets dirty fast and distorts the really wonderful sight picture. For such an expensive optic and one touted for competition, I just can't see how this hasn't continually come up.

So with that, I decided to remove the optic and swap it with a Holosun 507C that was installed on my S & W Model 41 which is in a fixed position on a Picatinny rail, and well back of the ejection port. I have other 507C(s) mounted on my PDP, PPQ, etc. They are well back of the ejection port and no splash of debris from the combustion. Nor does the Delta Point Pro, Vortex, you get my point. Problem number one, the SRO mounted on Walthers equals debris on the front lens. Solution, live with it or mount on another firearm, not affected by this.

Problem number 2 was addressing problem number one, swapping out the SRO.

Here's where I got into big trouble. The screw to the left came out easily enough but the right screw was not budging. And yes, it stripped. Then of course, I compounded the problem on the right screw and then the variety of remediations I attempted, including countersinking, heating, etc, (carefully with the optic mounted). Would not budge. What a mess. The reason I used Vibratite back in 2018, (a Methol-Ethyl-Keytone) product, not Blue Locktite was because it was rated better than Blue Loctite but still flexible if removing was needed. the point was more resistance to reciprocating mass, the screws won't loosen. I've used this before and never a problem. Some mounting companies supply this stuff with their product. It is NOT Red Loctite, it is adjustable, but, and there's the big but, it is significantly more difficult to remove than Blue Loctite due to the ratio of the small screws versus its holding ability This is my guess, my theory.

So looks like I have some not great options:

**Leave the SRO locked in and deal with it, (not a good choice)
**Purchase an additional slide
** Drill out the SRO which could ruin the SRO and the mount (the mount can be replaced, not a big deal, but the optic is $600ish)

**Or? Any additional ideas? I'm open to whatever at this point. The goal is to save the slide and the optic.

I've attached pics.

Bottom line. I would advise everyone to be careful and stick with Blue Loctite for optics mounting for the PDP,PPQ all Walthers and any Optics Ready hangun.
 

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Dammm Dude...that does look like poop. I can say this.....I was removing a Delta Point Pro the other day and had a similar problem...one screw broke loose and came out just fine. When attempting to make the initial 'break' on the other screw, I failed to use enough downward pressure on the screw driver and the dam thing slipped....oops. Skeered the poop outta me....I put that hex bit back in the head of the screw and lean on that sucker as hard as I could and gave it a twist..'click'...it broke loose and came out. I promptly hit the internet and ordered a new pair of screws.

If that ever happens again, I'm going to use some JB Weld, put a tiny bit on the tip of the hex bit and stick that gooey tip into the damaged screw....making sure the screw driver is absolutely aligned with the screw.....leave er' propped up and let er' cure. Then, clamp the slide down to the bench so it can't move or roll, grab hold of that screw driver, lean on it as hard as I can...may also have my German Shepherd sit on my shoulders for extra weight, then using my best grip and all that weight, give er' a twist.

If that fails, its time to take it to a gunsmith and do some cryin'....maybe he'll feel sorry for me. I think its probably time for you to do the same.... 馃槀 馃槀 馃槀 馃槀

I feel 'pretty' sure that putting the slide in a 'milling vise' and using the proper bit/cutters, the head of that screw should be able to be chewed off....a little damage to the optic could occur, but with any luck the head of a new screw might cover/hide any resulting marks/dings. Or, maybe he'll get lucky and the SRO will survive without a mark.

Good luck, and keep us posted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yep, no denying....it looks like poop. I've had tight ones and issues with all sorts of things before.but like you have seemed to wiggle out of them one way or another. Maybe a milling vise with a steady patient mindset might be the best option to possibly save the Red Dot. Bottom line, when you work on your stuff enough, unexpected sh__ can happen.

Isn't that true of anything we're trying to fix or work on?
 

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JB Weld! I put that sh on everything!

Except guns. That鈥檚 what loctite blue is for.
Hee, hee.....in this case, I'm only trying to 'glue' the hex bit to the boogered up head of the screw.....that's it. Agree on the loctite 262 'blue' .... I NEVER use the RED as I'm too much of a weenie and afraid that I might not be able to remove 'what ever it was' that I use the red poop on. I'll stick to the blue. 馃榿
 

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Yep, no denying....it looks like poop. I've had tight ones and issues with all sorts of things before.but like you have seemed to wiggle out of them one way or another. Maybe a milling vise with a steady patient mindset might be the best option to possibly save the Red Dot. Bottom line, when you work on your stuff enough, unexpected sh__ can happen.

Isn't that true of anything we're trying to fix or work on?
Yep, I've boogered up many ah things.....its the price I pay for learning the 'hard' way. 馃槀

I'm not a machinist, but I'm thinking that getting the slide properly secured and indexed in a proper vise on a proper 'big' drill press or end mill, then using proper cutting/drilling bits, its just a matter of taking little chunks at a time....little 'kisses' then eyeball it......simply removing the head of the screw. With the head of the screw gone, lift off the RSO, remove plate and chunk it....or if there's enough screw left to clamp some vise grips too, soak it in liquid wrench or something and give er' a twist....or, or, or.......
 

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It does look bad, but what I would probably do is clamp the slide to something so it won't move, then with a tiny drill bit (slightly smaller than the shaft of the screw) I'd attempt to drill out the core of that screw. That would get the screw out, or at least destroy it enough to get the optic off the plate without damaging the optic. However, saving the plate would likely be more effort than it's worth since that would then require a die set to retap the screw hole and scrape out the rest of the screw and thread locker. Honestly don't know if I'd trust the integrity of the plate at that point anyway.
 

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That tiny drill bit is gonna do one of two or three things...probably all....its gonna bend, walk and break...chances of boogerin' up the RSO or almost 100%. But, I agree, the slide needs to be properly secured and properly indexed/aligned, meaning, knowing the bolt pattern of the optic and with the slide properly indexed, the drilling/burring/cutting tool can be aligned within .0001 of the center of the bolt/screw hole. Just remove the head of the screw...DONE.

I'm thinkin' a bit/cutting tool kinda like this might be used. In a proper drill press or end mill these babies aren't gonna bend or walk.

 

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I've done it before with car parts that had fused together over time. Admittedly, the bolts/screws were a little larger, but if you have a good bit, and take your time, I have no doubt it could work on these small screws. Don't push in too hard and let the bit do the work. If these screws had the head stripped out from manual pressure, then it shows the screws are soft enough material that this would work just fine.

All that said, it's just another option and is what I would do. The OP should decide how to proceed based on his/her knowledge and skill level.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the great comments, advice and feedback. Useful for sure.

Called Earl's. Will probably send it to him to see what can be done. He's got the experience 50+ yrs, and if anyone can do it he can. Worth the try. For the future, will get the countersink bits and hope to not repeat the Vibratite seize-up.

Regarding the optic, Picture attached. I placed the Q5 SF Frames with the red circled area showing the clearance. For the SRO too much overhang. Again, great optic but excessive debris distorting the dot with just a few rounds.
 

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That tiny drill bit is gonna do one of two or three things...probably all....its gonna bend, walk and break...chances of boogerin' up the RSO or almost 100%.
Only if improperly sized and used. I say that because a properly-sized bit that is meant for drilling hard metal AND is sharp ... which is perfectly centered over the work piece ... with the work piece locked into place so it won't move ... will work just fine when using a drill press as long as the user is slow, methodical, keeps the bit cool using cutting fluid, and lets the drill press and bit do the cutting without applying a ton of force to try to hurry things up.

How do I know? I've drilled a world-legal CZ Scorpion's trigger pack screw (since the world legal ones have a collar on it to make it unremovable with any ease). Mine ... and another for a member of the armed forces to help him out as a 'thank you for your service' before he deployed. Each took me an hour, but the result of my (well spent) time was that I didn't have to re-tap the hole, I just had to clean the remnants out to make room for the new screw's threads. I probably spent as much time centering things up and locking them into place as I did drilling...

So, if it were me, I'd drill it ... but I have the required tools and patience. Someone who doesn't should likely involve a pro...
 

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I really wouldn't use a 'drill' bit....I'd use an end mill bit to dress up the top of the boogered up screw head. There's obviously some irregularities in the top of the screw, which will REALLY want to make a drill bit move around. I'd use an end mill bit/cutter to dress up the top of the boogered up head....after I'd made a nice flat spot, only then would I consider using a drill bit. BUT, a properly sized end mill bit may be all that's needed.


Along with what you said...proper speed, applied pressure, cutting fluid (keeping it cool) and going slow are ALL important. Yep, bring that cutter down and just 'kiss it'...then use the ole Mark I eyeball to check....proceed slowly and with caution.

Or, just let Earl do it. 馃槀 馃槀 馃槀
 

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I have gotten 2 stripped mounting screws out of my Delta Point Pro by using an easy out bit. You can buy the smallest one for ~$7 at Lowes or Home Depot. They look like a screw driver bit you would use in a Drill/Driver. One end of the bit is a regular drill bit, you use that to drill a starter hole in the top of the stripped screw, them flip the easy out around to what looks like a cone shaped reamer bit that is reverse 鈥渢hreaded鈥. You turn your drill to the reverse direction and push down, letting the 鈥渞eamer鈥 drill into the top of the screw that you drilled the starter hole in. Go slow. The reamer will grab the screw and reverse it out.

At least that has worked twice for me. It was an easy cheap fix
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the comments and advice.

Because I am dealing with the Q5 Steel Frame (Pro) slide ($395) plus mounting plate $50+ or - and the Optic, Trijicon SRO ($529 ish), I thought it best to stop myself from further hosing it. It felt like time to have an expert (probably the best) Earl Sheehan take a look at it and see what can be done. Or as he said, "In my 50+ years I've never worked on anything that can't be fixed". That convinced me straight up. As many of you may know Earl's is an official Walther Parts supplier but also Expert Gunsmith who knows literally everything about Walthers and probably everything firearm related. Anyway, the day he received it Tuesday, he called me and said, "All Done, give me a credit card and I'll get it out for you today". I was like, what? Really? Wow! Damn, amazing!

It's arriving this afternoon all fixed. He's got "Professional Tools" in house like Bridgeport Milling Machines at his disposal. When he told me about the Bridgeport, I lit up because I worked in metal fabrication/engraving in a previous life. I have lots of tools but not that kind of factory tool. Just lock it down use the right cutter/bit and drill it out. Plus the knowledge and experience behind you to make it happen!

This is good for all of us who own Walthers and work on their guns and end up getting over our heads. It's excellent to have a backstop guy or guru who knows his stuff. Walther Firearms and Accessories, Earl's Repair Service Inc. - Home Page

Will be supplying pics and further comments once I get it from UPS.
 

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Ha....I didn't mention Bridgeport, because whose got one of those in their garage? 馃槀 But yes, that's the right machine for the job and the right man too.

Congrats......and enjoy.

AND, I'm assuming, lesson learned. 馃榿
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Lesson learned. "We learn by doing". Otherwise we're either dead or boring!;)

See attached pics. The materials packed pic is how I received the parts today. Then look at the Work from Earl pic, Perfection! Total class act.

Then mounted the SRO on the Smith & Wesson Model 41 Picatinny rail and the Holosun 507C Green Dot on the Q5 SF frame picture. Both were "laser zeroed" and ready for our Saturday range day for real life adjustment.

And that's all she wrote. Big thumbs up and thanks to imaoldfart x 6,Damcowboy, surrealone.moparmagnum1,kar98 for the comments on this thread. For those reading, be careful with Vibra-tite!
 

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