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Both the PPS Classic and PPS M2 are excellent CC pistols. While looks count for nothing in a gunfight, my eye likes the lines of the PPS Classic more than those of the PPS M2.

PS: I would really like an alloy frame PPS Classic.
 

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I really don't see the fuss concerning the backstrap. Decide which backstrap fits your hand, apply a Talon wrap-around adhesive grip (or similar) and be done with it - your backstrap won't budge.

The PPS (Classic) WAS issued in LE configuration (I have one) - assuming you mean with 6- 7- and 8-round magazines and phosphorescent sights.

Balor
I have a HandAll sleeve with a palm swell on mine; it fits my hand perfectly.
 

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Still laughing about the armchair warriors worried about the backstraps. As someone who has used the PPS (in .40 cal) for years, I can tell you I have never had the backstrap pop off once. I have had the firearm drop more than once. I even watched it tumble down a flight of steps once! Yes, I use firearms for more than a range toy!

I also have the PPS M2 (in 9mm, of course), but still carry my original. I don't mind the new grip profile (although they need to add some palm-swell to make it more ergo...like the PPQ), but I don't want to give up the paddle mag release. It is also the reason I do not own an M2 in anything else. I own multiple 9mm and .40 cal PPQs w/paddle and love them. I would own the other caliber variations (.45 and .22 cal)...if only they had the paddle release. Unfortunately, Walther has chosen to listen to weenie gun reviewers, armchair warriors, and lawyers and give up one of the most significant features of their firearms!

As always...YMMV!!!
 

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I wonder why Walther omitted this feature (backstrap disconnect) from the M2?

It might have had something to do with the chorus of whining emanating from the other side of the pond.

The same chorus of whining which caused them to drop the perfectly sensible lever magazine release.

Balor
 

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I speak from experience: dropped my PPS only once, and the backstrap came off. That is how I learned about the deactivation. Then, I read about it on the forum later. It doesn't scare me to death, as likelihood is small that it would happen in a gunfight, but I do not ignore the issue, and wish that Walther had put a little more thought into the original design. I just think some other guns are more resistant to such incapacitation.
 

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I wonder why Walther omitted this feature (backstrap disconnect) from the M2?
Most likely cost. i.e. It cost more to produce the product with that feature. With the rise in single-stack competition in the market space placing downward pressure on MSRPs as the M2 was being conceived, I'm sure Walther looked at every place it could reasonably save money in order to keep costs low … in order to maximize profits on a pistol whose introductory price had to be substantially lower than that of the PPS Classic when it was first released.
 

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I speak from experience: dropped my PPS only once, and the backstrap came off. That is how I learned about the deactivation. Then, I read about it on the forum later. It doesn't scare me to death, as likelihood is small that it would happen in a gunfight, but I do not ignore the issue, and wish that Walther had put a little more thought into the original design. I just think some other guns are more resistant to such incapacitation.

"That is how I learned about the deactivation." It is basic firearm safety practice to understand how your firearm works before you load it. Even if you did not have the owner's manual; you certainly could have downloaded it.
 

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For all you people complaining about the backstrap disconnect, let me just say that I -love- that feature and it influenced my purchasing decision. Why? In a word: Travel.



You see, when I fly, I have to check my firearm according to TSA rules. When doing so, the unloaded firearm, unloaded magazines, and ammunition are all transported in the same locked container to which only I have the key. So far so good, right?



Well, as an added safety precaution, I remove the polymer backstrap from the pistol and take that with me in my carry-on bag … such that if someone cuts the lock and takes the pistol … or just steals the whole thing … the individual doesn't have a readily-operable firearm in his/her possession (at an airport, of all places).



I bought the PPS Classic to be able to readily deep conceal it in business attire sans coat/vest. At the time, travel was part of the gig, too, so it mattered. (I should also note that such travel is the ONLY reason I remove the backstrap aside from the occasional deep cleaning.)
That is an excellent idea!

-- Mark
 

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They SHOULD at least make limited runs. No retooling - and they would sell.



They COULD easily make a fix to the backstrap disconnect. Having a couple of backstraps is NICE.
Having worked with manufacturing, if Walther was to do this expect at least a $100 price increase. It is not easy or cheap to switch a production line especially for limited runs. One place I worked had short run, high turn production. That significantly increased costs on the products. Scheduling was always difficult.

-- Mark
 

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"That is how I learned about the deactivation." It is basic firearm safety practice to understand how your firearm works before you load it. Even if you did not have the owner's manual; you certainly could have downloaded it.
Thanks for the lecture/insight. That is one of the wonders of the internet: there is always an expert out there to tell you what you should do. Sorry, but I'm going to hang on to my ignorance about the internal design flaws of guns that I buy, just to make life more interesting. In the past, I've never had to concern myself too much about a combat weapon becoming disabled by a part falling off so easily. As noted, I expected Walther, a major player in defensive weapons for many years, to put out a product similar to, if not better, than the obvious competition. That would seem to be a good marking practice. And, as stated before, I do not expect such a catastrophe to occur in any great likelihood...but....it could. Do I worry? Not that much. Maybe if I get old and feeble, and prone to dropping my gun all the time, I'll shed the PPS and carry some other gun that has a better history of reliability when dropped. I'm a big boy, maybe I'll just carry my S&W 4" .45 Hand Ejector concealed and make the Walther a range gun. The market and the world have infinite choices and solutions.
 

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As noted, I expected Walther, a major player in defensive weapons for many years, to put out a product similar to, if not better, than the obvious competition.
Your statement makes me wonder how you would have defined “similar to, if not better than, the obvious competition”. Given that the PPS (the pistol under discussion, in its original form) was introduced in 2007, what would “the obvious competition” have been at that time?

I'm aware that Kahr had an offering already on the market, but the comparable offerings from Springfield, S&W (Shield), Beretta, SIG Sauer, Ruger, etc. all came afterwards, not to mention the G-Word - who arrived rather late at the party.

From a historical perspective, it would seem to me that the PPS didn't have an awful lot of “obvious competition” at the time of its introduction.

Balor
 

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A G27, G26, or G36 (.45) would have easily be competition for the PPS original. Sure, the PPS is thinner, but for most of the people in the market for a compact CCW, those Glocks, and S&W's 3913, 3914, and Chief Special autos were also around. If I remember, the Walther was also a bit pricier, comparably, than it is today. That brings other guns to the table, when size is not the only consideration.
 

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Interesting enough, I bought the M2 version years ago, than I stumbled upon a M1 in 40sw at my LGS, been carrying it ever since. Also picked up a M1 in 9mm for the hell of it because it was dirt cheap, but I don’t carry that one. Prefer the .40 because it makes bigger holes than the 9mm.<img src="http://www.waltherforums.com/forum/images/smilies/biggrin.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Big Grin" class="inlineimg" />

https://imgur.com/a/Pkb61Js
I like your way of thinking. I kinda prefer .40 too.
 

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Thanks for the lecture/insight. That is one of the wonders of the internet: there is always an expert out there to tell you what you should do. Sorry, but I'm going to hang on to my ignorance about the internal design flaws of guns that I buy, just to make life more interesting. In the past, I've never had to concern myself too much about a combat weapon becoming disabled by a part falling off so easily. As noted, I expected Walther, a major player in defensive weapons for many years, to put out a product similar to, if not better, than the obvious competition. That would seem to be a good marking practice. And, as stated before, I do not expect such a catastrophe to occur in any great likelihood...but....it could. Do I worry? Not that much. Maybe if I get old and feeble, and prone to dropping my gun all the time, I'll shed the PPS and carry some other gun that has a better history of reliability when dropped. I'm a big boy, maybe I'll just carry my S&W 4" .45 Hand Ejector concealed and make the Walther a range gun. The market and the world have infinite choices and solutions.
A "big boy" would practice basic firearm safety and read the directions. A "big boy" wouldn't try to rationalize negligent firearm practice.
 
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