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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello All,

I recently added PPQ Q5 as part of my competition gun, I am just wondering if anyone knows what is the stock recoil spring weight?

I switched to BT Guide Rod and uses standard recoil spring. It feels way more than 10 lbs recoil spring I run in my Glock 34 and Tanfoglio Limited pro.

If it is more than 10 lbs, any aftermarket sells 10lb spring for it? if not, I guess my best options to trim some coils

Thanks in advance for any input!
 

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I just performed what OF calls a ******* test on the factory rod+spring for my PPQ 45 yesterday using an accurate kitchen scale and I reached the 11lb limit with approx. 2/3" compression. I am not familiar with the Q5 spring but I suspect it's the same on both models. My best guess at this time is the spring is closer to 15lb.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I just performed what OF calls a ******* test on the factory rod+spring for my PPQ 45 yesterday using an accurate kitchen scale and I reached the 11lb limit with approx. 2/3" compression. I am not familiar with the Q5 spring but I suspect it's the same on both models. My best guess at this time is the spring is closer to 15lb.
I assume so as well, I might buy few factory springs and play around with it. Thanks!
 

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Buy a SS guide rod and springs from Wilson Combat......soooooo easy to change the springs on these guide rods. You'll need to call the factory and make sure they send you a guide rod 'without' the 'red loctite'. Request NO loctite and finger tight.

https://ssguiderods.com/

They use a Wilson Combat 17 lb. spring on their PPQ guide rods. You can pick up some 15 and 13 pound springs from Wilson Combat. Happy testing. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Buy a SS guide rod and springs from Wilson Combat......soooooo easy to change the springs on these guide rods. You'll need to call the factory and make sure they send you a guide rod 'without' the 'red loctite'. Request NO loctite and finger tight.

https://ssguiderods.com/

They use a 17 lb. spring on their PPQ guide rods. You can pick up some 15 and 13 pound springs from Wilson Combat. Happy testing. :D

Sweet, thanks! will be looking into it!
 

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Buy a SS guide rod and springs from Wilson Combat......soooooo easy to change the springs on these guide rods. You'll need to call the factory and make sure they send you a guide rod 'without' the 'red loctite'. Request NO loctite and finger tight.

https://ssguiderods.com/

They use a Wilson Combat 17 lb. spring on their PPQ guide rods. You can pick up some 15 and 13 pound springs from Wilson Combat. Happy testing. :D
I'm thinking of going stiffer then the 17lb spring on the SS GR unit, my PPQ 45 throws brass around 15 ft (230gr Sig elite perf FMJ). Yet to see a FTF in 1000 rds, even with INTENTIONAL limp wristing.

IMHO; 17lb is too weak, and slams the slide stop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm thinking of going stiffer then the 17lb spring on the SS GR unit, my PPQ 45 throws brass around 15 ft (230gr Sig elite perf FMJ). Yet to see a FTF in 1000 rds, even with INTENTIONAL limp wristing.

IMHO; 17lb is too weak, and slams the slide stop.
It might be the 45s but in my experience with 9mm, the less lb of the recoil spring doesn't slam the slide so it is easier to have quicker acquisition. Therefore I use 10lb recoil springs. Learned from Robert Vogel himself during my training sessions with him
 

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IMHO; 17lb is too weak, and slams the slide stop.
Are you shooting competition and if so are you using a lighter load/bullet? I would think that greater than 17lb would create enhanced muzzle bounce especially in the downward direction which would require an extra 1/2-1 second recovery to reacquire? I am not a competition shooter but in my double/triple taps I see a slight difference between stronger and lighter springs in my DPM system. Here's a video that explains better than I:

 

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Are you shooting competition and if so are you using a lighter load/bullet? I would think that greater than 17lb would create enhanced muzzle bounce especially in the downward direction which would require an extra 1/2-1 second recovery to reacquire? I am not a competition shooter but in my double/triple taps I see a slight difference between stronger and lighter springs in my DPM system. Here's a video that explains better than I:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w3UVLm2GajI
Using the Q45 for defensive carry/home defense, shoot it twice a month, 100 to 200 rds per session.

Been nothing but 230 gr Sig V-Crown JHP & Sig 230 Elite-P FMJ run.

I end each session loving the PPQ, yet hating how far it slings brass (farther then any semi-auto I've fired). I have no issues running long strings, quicker then the P227 it replaced in EDC.
 

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I found that the DPM does not throw the brass like the standard spring but I don't recall what the total combined spring rate is.
The faster follow ups of the PPQ vs the P227 has me thinking the stiffer spring in the Sig reduces brass sling distance, but increases barrel recoil rise.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Are you shooting competition and if so are you using a lighter load/bullet? I would think that greater than 17lb would create enhanced muzzle bounce especially in the downward direction which would require an extra 1/2-1 second recovery to reacquire? I am not a competition shooter but in my double/triple taps I see a slight difference between stronger and lighter springs in my DPM system. Here's a video that explains better than I:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w3UVLm2GajI
Agreed, the reason I want to reduce my recoil spring
 

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IMHO; 17lb is too weak, and slams the slide stop.
What do you mean by "slide stop"? Are you talking about the slide release, or the "slide stop" that you must depress to take the slide off of the frame when field stripping?

Either way, how would a weak recoil spring have a negative effect on this slide stop?

I found that the DPM does not throw the brass like the standard spring but I don't recall what the total combined spring rate is.
If it doesn't sling the brass as far, then this must mean that the slide is not moving to the rear as fast as it is with the stock spring installed when the brass hits the ejector. In effect, this means that this recoil reduction guide rod performs the same function as a heavier recoil spring, at least in this last section of travel.

For reliability reasons, I'd rather go with a recoil spring on the lighter side than on the heavier side, as a lighter recoil spring is more likely to function reliably with weak loads, a weak grip, and/or shooting in awkward positions, all of which are possibilities in a defensive encounter.

There is a limit to how light you would want to go though. Keep in mind that there is a striker spring in the pistol that pushes the slide in the opposite direction as the slide is returning to battery. This is one reason why recoil springs for striker fired pistols are generally heavier than recoil springs for hammer fired pistols. Also keep in mind that a lighter recoil spring means that the slide will move faster to the rear, and all of the springs need to keep up. The mag springs need to push the bullet in the upward direction fast enough so that the slide does not "outrun" the cartridge when feeding, and the extractor and extractor spring will be getting more of a workout. Lighter recoil springs should increase frame battering in the rearward direction of slide travel as well.

The manufacturers put these springs with these spring rates in there for a reason, and they tuned each spring rate to function with one another. I'd rather leave the pistol stock. In my opinion, there are far too many people on this forum that feel otherwise, especially in regards to defensive pistols. What, exactly, are you guys trying to gain here, and what exactly are you using these pistols for, if you don't mind me asking?
 

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What do you mean by "slide stop"? Are you talking about the slide release, or the "slide stop" that you must depress to take the slide off of the frame when field stripping?

Either way, how would a weak recoil spring have a negative effect on this slide stop?......
I was referring to the slides rear travel limit hard stop (chamber open). The way brass is launched 5yds tells me the slide velocity is extremely high during the last .2" of travel. It even overthrows brass limp wristed.

It's always been my understanding that when brass is overthrown due to high slide velocity, a stiffer spring is in order (with shooting session verification of proper function).
 

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Personally, I'd just stick with the stock spring. It came that way from the factory and there don't seem to be durability issues with the design. If there are in the future then Walther should take care of it, and the pistol should be more reliable with the stock spring.
 

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Personally, I'd just stick with the stock spring. It came that way from the factory and there don't seem to be durability issues with the design. If there are in the future then Walther should take care of it, and the pistol should be more reliable with the stock spring.
My concern is the excessive round count (3k rounds per yr) of 230 gr I'm putting thru a gun Walther designed to reliably feed 180gr while limp wristed.

I would not be surprised if Walther refused warranty service if they saw an unworn plastic guide rod ass'y in a well worn gun. That's why I'm considering more R' spring pressure.
 

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I really don't think there is much cause for concern here. 3k rounds a year is really not that much, and if the PPQ couldn't handle that, I'd move on to another design.

As far as the concern over service, I doubt Walther would refuse service because of how the recoil spring looked. If someone here ever has that experience, I hope they will let us know.

Most .45 shooters I've run into run a steady diet of 230gr bullets through their pistols. I have to imagine that Walther knows this. Many pistol designs out there are undersprung in regards to the recoil spring. Glock pistols come to mind immediately. This will not stop a pistol from being durable enough to take whatever most people will throw at it, and it usually helps with reliability.
 
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