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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys after getting my pistol back from Walter arms with my new Apex trigger installed there's no doubt this pistol is the most accurate 45 that I own the striker fired but it took me two magazines to get used to the recoil which is so much harsher than my Gen 4 Glock 30 which is very soft.

And the other thing that really bugged me about my PPQ was I would get unintentional double taps on occasion because the trigger so light and my magazine would be released as I accidentally hit the bag release and more than one occasion

It definitely needs either a stippling job or some grip tape as long as I remember to have a death grip on it it shoots perfectly fine and I could do very fast shots but compare that to my sig axg Pro recoil on the PPQ is like a bucking bronco
 

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I mean the PPQ does have more slide weight vs the glock. Plus the single stag spring system a couple of factors between both handguns. I had the 30sf and that was a pain to shoot, same for the hk usp 45 compact. Not too sure about the PPQ line currently but i know the PDP and P99 had some of the slide weight reduced with cnc work.
 

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I have a G21 & G21SF. My PPQ 45 is my best of the three. I don’t have an apex trigger but my stock trigger really does me justice. If I had to rate them:
1. PPQ 45
2.21SF(fits my hand much better than the 21)
3.21
The Glocks are nice but less ergonomic and more stodgy than the Walther
 

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Hey, can't stand the heat, get out of the 45 shooter's kitchen... 🤪

Hahah just kidding. My father has an SW99 in 45, and it is a snappy thing, for a full size pistol. But I get such a rise out of 45 ACP shooting that it is a welcome thing to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hey, can't stand the heat, get out of the 45 shooter's kitchen... 🤪

Hahah just kidding. My father has an SW99 in 45, and it is a snappy thing, for a full size pistol. But I get such a rise out of 45 ACP shooting that it is a welcome thing to me.
My Glock 30 (45Acp) is a soft push. The 45acp kicks harder than my full size p320 .357sig. once I got used to the PPQ I was doing great with double taps but it took 2 to 3 magazine before I got the hang of it. Will try putting a bigger back strap and stipling it. Another irksome thing the mag release button I keep ejecting it not meaning to
 

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I have found all of my Walters to be pretty tight and stiff from the factory with a significant break in. Especially the older models. The springs are tight and barrels are accurate. I know ammo is expensive these days but shoot it a lot and things will mellow out. At least they're not as bad as custom 1911s because I have had to shoot well over 1200 rounds to break in my customs. A late and old friend and shootist/cowboy load aficionado, told me the same when I was young decades ago. My first Walther an SS P38 war trophy was very tight, mags also, and every Walther since has had tight actions and magazine springs. My favorite 1911A1 has over 15k probably 20k at this point with replacement flat CroSil action spring kit from EGW. I find most pistol grips are not big enough for my hands so I stipple, use grip tape, and source larger grip modules myself. It can be frustrating at times bit there is typically a solution.
 

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Guys after getting my pistol back from Walter arms with my new Apex trigger installed there's no doubt this pistol is the most accurate 45 that I own the striker fired but it took me two magazines to get used to the recoil which is so much harsher than my Gen 4 Glock 30 which is very soft.
Did you fire the pistol before modifying it?

All of the 99-series pistols, in all calibers, have "snappy" recoil impulses compared to other polymer pistols the same size and in the same caliber. This is normal, and what I've come to expect from every pistol that evolved from the P99. In my hands, the muzzle comes back down about as quickly as it goes up, and this does not stop these pistols from being some of the easiest pistols to shoot quickly and accurately.

Everyone should put a decent amount of rounds through their pistols before modifying anything on them other than maybe the sights. If you decide now that the characteristics of the pistol are not for you, you're out at least the labor for installing the trigger.
 

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OP, that accidental double tap you had sounds like something associated with an insufficient amount of grip pressure. If there is too much slop in your grip, the weapon will shift back against your flexed fingers opening them slightly, and as your grip recesses, you'll cause the weapon to drop back down and press the trigger against your trigger finger. What happened was that you essentially bump fired the pistol. I have one AK platform with a Tapco G2 trigger and another with an ALG trigger, each of which is insanely light, and while shooting from a bench, I have accidentally bump fired them against my shoulder because I was supporting the butt stock with my left and and keeping a very light grip on the pistol grip.

Before you worry about stippling, work on your grip. Improving stippling without working on your grip will yield you minimal results. Improving your grip, without improving the stippling, will yield you greater results.
 

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Yea, I have a g2 in my AK as well. I have ”accidentally” bump fired mine too. My Ppq needed no trigger mods at all. I am very pleased with it.
My wife has a PPQ. The trigger is absolutely top notch as it is from the factory. Upgrading that is like trying to upgrade the jewel work on a Fabergé egg.
 

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My wife has a PPQ. The trigger is absolutely top notch as it is from the factory. Upgrading that is like trying to upgrade the jewel work on a Fabergé egg.
After watching many failure videos and reading about years of duty-related accidental discharges, I find trigger upgrades to be risky. That said I do my own on several platforms I have extensive experience with but the knowledge comes from a lot of education and experience. I remember watching the SIG mud test and the match Legion trigger failed whereas the milspec trigger did not. There is a lot of evidence to support being very cautious when upgrading a duty gun. I have found using the proper lubrication and shooting the gun to be effective at getting the trigger to smooth out. In some cases polishing can be done without changing sear geometry to smooth out movement. Fine stoning is almost always effective but requires a jig or exceptional knowledge and specialty tools and lubrication. Spring weight is a big player in the game but can make the trigger less reliable. Materials density is also a significant factor: if your sear surfaces are soft you will never achieve a positive result. Additionally, many sear surfaces rely on metal surface treatments which make polishing and stoning them risky: once you break through the surface hardener/dry lube you end up with a soft material that will bind and eventually fail. I'm sure Walther's trigger mods are solid: that would be the only path I would take as far as a FCG exchange. I have had good results with a PPS trigger job but it was polishing and lubrication with very little material removal. There are always subtle things you can do to improve the trigger that does not involve replacement or alteration. Simply detail stripping the striker out and soaking all parts in an ultrasonic cleaner can remove micro debris from the channel and on surfaces. Springs can be inspected for binding: I have had several springs that were binding from the factory. Buying replacements are cheap and prudent for future replacement. CroSil springs can be a good upgrade if you have that option. Walther does well in noting lubrication points on their guns, and whether to use oil or grease: and you should stick to these instructions. I have found Walther's to have a bit too much grease from the factory in the springs and channels: this is resolved with shooting over time. At this point, I do an incredibly detailed strip and de-greasing on everything I purchase: after I do a function check and shoot a few boxes. You just have to pay attention to detail and put a thin coating of lube on all metal surfaces after you strip, be careful not to lose parts, botch reassembly, and grease specific points as noted in the manual. Most people do not have the aptitude for this: and I would be hesitant to have a smith do this for me unless I knew he was a bit of a watchmaker type, or an expert on that platform.
 

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After watching many failure videos and reading about years of duty-related accidental discharges, I find trigger upgrades to be risky. That said I do my own on several platforms I have extensive experience with but the knowledge comes from a lot of education and experience. I remember watching the SIG mud test and the match Legion trigger failed whereas the milspec trigger did not. There is a lot of evidence to support being very cautious when upgrading a duty gun. I have found using the proper lubrication and shooting the gun to be effective at getting the trigger to smooth out. In some cases polishing can be done without changing sear geometry to smooth out movement. Fine stoning is almost always effective but requires a jig or exceptional knowledge and specialty tools and lubrication. Spring weight is a big player in the game but can make the trigger less reliable. Materials density is also a significant factor: if your sear surfaces are soft you will never achieve a positive result. Additionally, many sear surfaces rely on metal surface treatments which make polishing and stoning them risky: once you break through the surface hardener/dry lube you end up with a soft material that will bind and eventually fail. I'm sure Walther's trigger mods are solid: that would be the only path I would take as far as a FCG exchange. I have had good results with a PPS trigger job but it was polishing and lubrication with very little material removal. There are always subtle things you can do to improve the trigger that does not involve replacement or alteration. Simply detail stripping the striker out and soaking all parts in an ultrasonic cleaner can remove micro debris from the channel and on surfaces. Springs can be inspected for binding: I have had several springs that were binding from the factory. Buying replacements are cheap and prudent for future replacement. CroSil springs can be a good upgrade if you have that option. Walther does well in noting lubrication points on their guns, and whether to use oil or grease: and you should stick to these instructions. I have found Walther's to have a bit too much grease from the factory in the springs and channels: this is resolved with shooting over time. At this point, I do an incredibly detailed strip and de-greasing on everything I purchase: after I do a function check and shoot a few boxes. You just have to pay attention to detail and put a thin coating of lube on all metal surfaces after you strip, be careful not to lose parts, botch reassembly, and grease specific points as noted in the manual. Most people do not have the aptitude for this: and I would be hesitant to have a smith do this for me unless I knew he was a bit of a watchmaker type, or an expert on that platform.
The only upgrade I've ever done with a pistol was to change the OEM curved trigger in my P365 for an OEM flat trigger, just for the better geometry. I won't mess with springs because reliable ignition is of paramount importance to me.
 

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The only upgrade I've ever done with a pistol was to change the OEM curved trigger in my P365 for an OEM flat trigger, just for the better geometry. I won't mess with springs because reliable ignition is of paramount importance to me.
Wise. I would be interested to see what the top tier is using in their Glocks/Sigs these days probably factory triggers. Once you shoot them 10k times they tend to smooth out. I love how well my Walther barrels hold up compares to some other brands: I really wish I could buy a Walther barrel for my Sig but my Sig can already outshoot me soo...
 

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Wise. I would be interested to see what the top tier is using in their Glocks/Sigs these days probably factory triggers. Once you shoot them 10k times they tend to smooth out. I love how well my Walther barrels hold up compares to some other brands: I really wish I could buy a Walther barrel for my Sig but my Sig can already outshoot me soo...
I put thousands of rounds through my second pistol, a G21 I bought in 2005, and the trigger did, indeed smooth out very nicely. I got an idea of how much it had smoothed out when a Glock armorer put an updated trigger into it during a free inspection and servicing taking place at an LGS in 2010. I could definitely tell the difference between the weight and break cleanliness when I took it to the range with the new trigger. It wasn't a bad trigger--it was just no longer a use-smoothed one like its predecessor.
 
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