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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I'll try to keep this short, my Walther PPK will sometimes not go into battery but will get stuck halfway closed going forward.

I know details will be asked so here it go:

1) Yes I lube the gun before firing it
2) When the gun gets stuck trying to go into battery, I push the slide forward and it falls into battery
3) Removing the magazine seems to let it slide into battery also
4) When I remove the magazine, one of the bullets is slightly forward in the magazine like it is pushed and prepped to go into the chamber
5) I can sometimes fire 6 rounds consecutively, sometimes not.
6) I have used Walther magazines and also Mec-Gar aftermarket magazines, behavior happens with both.

Any thoughts?
 

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As for number 4, that's normal behavior.

On the rest, is the gun stainless perchance (check for galling on the slide-to-rail contact areas if it is)? Is the recoil spring the factory-standard 20 pounds, or has it been replaced with a reduced power spring?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, the gun is a stainless steel format.

As for the spring, I have never once changed it out in the ~4 years I've owned it.

When you say galling, do you mean scratches or chips?
 

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Check to be sure the recoil spring is installed correctly. The tight (narrow) end of the spring goes over the barrel to prevent the spring from flying off when the slide is removed. The larger (wider) closed coil end goes towards the muzzle. Putting the recoil spring on backwards can cause the slide to short cycle and remain partially open. Also, the sharp end of the spring can gouge the barrel if it's installed backwards.
 

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If you bought it used, the previous owner may have changed the recoil spring.

#3 leads me to think it could be the recoil spring. My thought: the mag spring apparently provides just enough upward pressure on the cartridge to overcome the recoil spring and just barely hold the slide open. Makes me think you may have a reduced power recoil spring, as UE suggested. Maybe in combination with an x-power mag spring.

What ammo are you using? Ball or HP? Brand? Sometimes certain guns do not like certain ammo.

The above advice costs precisely what it's worth. ;)
 

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galling

Lubricating the slide rails with grease instead of oil should help prevent it. The general rule is, "If it slides grease it." Oil the rest of the gun lightly.
What MoonWolf said. The reason I asked if the weapon is stainless is that stainless is particularly susceptible to galling. This is especially true if the stainless used in the slide and on the frame are the same alloy, but I believe Interarms and S&W used dissimilar alloys on the two to help mitigate this. Even so, you can still get galling if this weapon wasn't properly lubricated by the previous owner.

Milspec brings up a good point about the reversal of the recoil spring, as well. In fact, that's probably the most likely culprit. But if the spring is oriented properly and you still have the problem, remove the spring and test the smoothness of operation between the slide and frame to see if you can feel any snagging resistance. That'll give you a clue as to whether or not you may have galling causing binding between the two.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
As for the ammo, I'm using a mix of two. American and PMC, FMJ .380 ammo. I've had more luck with PMC but both still get stuck halfway thru battery.

I am not the original owner of this firewarm, so yes the spring may have been switched out. It's installed properly with the wider end towards the muzzle.

I've been meaning to get gun grease as well but have neglected my opportunities to go get it. I'll do this next time.
 

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Sounds like the recoil spring is to blame. Get yourself a replacement.

If it's a S&W then it's covered under Walther's Legendary Lifetime Warranty, and they'll send you one for free.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I just called Walther Arms and they are closes now. I will get on the horn with them and see what they say and if they ship me said spring.

Thank you all for your advice, I will follow up in a week or so.
 

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No problem, glad I could help.
 

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Be aware though that even a perfectly functioning recoil spring will be slightly shorter than an unused one from the factory because after a spring has "set" it will become shorter than brand new.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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While the lighting in those pics is far less than ideal for a proper inspection, I don't believe I see any galling. There's some wear here and there, but I don't see any galling.

Galling has a very distinctive look, as it leaves behind rather ragged-looking edges on any contact points, and the only spots I can think of where anything comes into close enough contact to cause galling is where the slide's walls meet the frame.
 

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I wanted to show you all what the Walther looks like and to tell me if there is any real galling happening on the frame.
First of all, pictures aren't really going to tell us anything. There's a reason I suggested removing the recoil spring, placing the slide back onto the frame, and cycling the slide by hand to check for resistance. If galling is the issue (and that's still just a guess at this point), you almost certainly aren't going to be able to see it before you can feel it. If you do see anything, it's most likely mechanical wear rather than true galling, which is a form of adhesive wear.

As I said in post #7, "This is especially true if the stainless used in the slide and on the frame are the same alloy, but I believe Interarms and S&W used dissimilar alloys on the two to help mitigate this. Even so, you can still get galling if this weapon wasn't properly lubricated by the previous owner."

Putting it simply, galling is almost microscopic in nature and very hard to visually detect (if I'm wrong on this, I'm sure MGMike will correct me on it). It's also fairly rare in properly lubricated firearms because today's manufacturers understand they have to use dissimilar stainless steel alloys to mitigate galling. An example of incorrect stainless formulation and application would be the early AMT Hardballer.

Neither Interarms/Ranger nor S&W had a reputation for this, so if this weapon is experiencing galling it's almost a sure bet that the previous owner was running it dry as a bone.
 

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I have the same gun and looks just like yours. I had my first fail to battery on Friday, but in my case it only happened when I racked the slide. Every time it fired it cycled properly. FWIW I'm running a Wolff 17 lb spring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
So here is the picture of the new spring that came in from Walther.

The first picture is the new spring not on the barrel, it is mighty long without any form of compression/stress on it.

The second picture is the new spring on the barrel after a few dozen slide racks. It is slightly longer and I also finally got gun grease for this firearm.

The new spring has thicket tips at the end of each side I've noticed.

I haven't taken it to the range yet but I wanted to upload these since they were requested by MGMike.
 

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