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The magazine on the right looks like a Colt magazine. If so it’s desirable and worth some money. Not a lot but $100 or so. Don’t know about the other one
 

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Yep, that appears to be an original Colt, they were blued that way. Yes indeed some Colt guys at a 1911 Forum will be all over that. There are a lot of good people at some of these forums and they will tell you what you have and what it is worth. Nearly all forums have a "for sale" section just like this one does.

Regarding your PPK/S hang on to a bit will you. You can always sell, you can never get it back again. Take your time and think about it. While you are thinking here is a bit of Walther PP and PPK history. The PPK pistol was first built in 1929. It was designed for a smaller caliber, .32 acp. The pistol soon came chambered for .22 long rifle and then .380 acp. The original pistols were manufactured at the Zellis-Mehlis plant in Germany. Production ended in 1945 when American soldiers arrived and captured the plant. After the war Germany could not produce firearms but France could so production was moved to France where the Manurhin Co produced the PPK and PP pistols. The 1968 US Gun Control Act set some criteria that firearms must meet in order to be imported. The PPK didn't make the list...it was too short, too light. So....your pistol was developed, the PPK/S. Production would continue with the pistol being made at Manurhin, then Ulm, Germany, then Ranger in Alabama and then Smith and Wesson and now at the new Walther plant in Ft Smith Arkansas.

A lot of people find the slide hard to cycle on these pistols. The pistol is a blowback design. This means the gas pressure developed from propelling the round out of the barrel is used to blow the slide straight back. This pressure is considerable so a strong recoil spring that surrounds the barrel is required to tame the movement so the pistol isn't damaged. The downside is the slide is hard to pull back and the pistol really kicks hard. John Browning, the creator of the Colt 1911 pistol developed a different system. His system uses locking and unlocking lugs that allow the rear of the barrel to drop. A masterpiece. Movement here absorbs much of the recoil or a .45 acp pistol would be very unpleasant to shoot.

So that is what you have....a Walther PPK/S in .380 acp. A classic pistol and still highly desirable. The year of manufacture might be stamped on the frame as viewed through the ejection port. Something like 73 or 92.

Regarding that hard to retract slide.....



A Client up the street, 6'-2" man, handed me this pistol and said he didn't want it after I told him the recoil spring could not be cut in half to make it easier to pull the slide back. He could not pull it back. I offered him $600 but he wouldn't take it. Well yes indeed...I'd be glad to have a brand new PPK/S. It is a .380 also. I can't tell what the other magazine fits...the top looks similar to one of my S&Wesson magazines but many of these mags are pretty similar. Thanks for bringing in some interesting items to discuss. How about a photo of the pistol. The legend on the left side of the slide will tell where it was manufactured. The right side of the slide might tell who imported it if it was imported. There might be a date and there should be proof marks where the pistol was fired with very high powered rounds to make sure the barrel would not blow up with regular ammo. 1917
 

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I should add that magazines for your pistol are not rare or expensive. Mecgar makes some that fit and function fine. They cost about $20 to $30 dollars each. I have them in .380 and .32 ACP. Many times when an old pistol is found in a gun shop for sale someone has already pirated any extra mags and sold them separately so the pistol usually comes with only one mag. This is a problem if you are purchasing a really old PP or PPK in .22 as those mags can go for $150 each as none have been made for years. Or if you have a very old pistol and you want correct mags for it. But the relatively modern PPK/S produce only since 1968...nah, not really an old pistol.. 1917
 

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The reason Colt mags are two-tone is because the top of the mag was hardened. Copies have a straight line mark but the originals are uneven.
 

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And here is why the slide is so hard to pull back. A big ole recoil spring that has to be compressed but also slows the slide down when firing so the pistol doesn't hammer itself to death. 1917
 

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Discussion Starter #29
I will hang on to the ppk/s for a bit. I guess I can use it to strengthen my arms while watching tv. 🤣. My little 38 revolver is my self defense hand gun. I will get you some pictures of the ppk/s.
 

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The year of manufacture might be stamped on the frame as viewed through the ejection port. Something like 73 or 92.
The gun in question is most likely a PPK/S made by Smith & Wesson because in post #1 we learn that the calibre is shown on the frame (barrel hood). Earlier models made in Europe and those made in the US for Interarms don't have this marking.

If we take it very seriously, it's not the year that is stamped on German made PPK/S models, it's always a two-digit year code of numbers or beginning in 1977 of letters. Additionally, the code doesn't refer to the year of manufacture, but to the year of the proof of the gun. In most cases they're the same of course. Only the year codes up to HH (1977) were stamped on the barrel hood, later guns got the proof marks including the date code on the frame too but at a lower position between slide and trigger.
 

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*****, you have an Ulm, Germany PPK/S pistol that was imported by Interarms in VA. That is a nice one. If you look at the frame through the ejection port you can see the proof marks, 74 meaning 1974. I see you have the box and goodies...that raises the value of the set. There are plenty of people who will want this pistol if you decide to sell. Also note the beavertail on your pistol vs the one on the Smith model I posted (that was not my pistol btw). Many Members here do not like what Smith did with the large beavertail and the brand new pistol being built at Ft Smith has the same large tail. Most of us prefer the original as your pistol has. The reason for the larger tail was to hold a shooters hand down a little bit further away from the slide/hammer. People with fatter hands have had the slide slice off a bit of skin by the slide. Not an issue for me. It looks like the pistol is in very good shape. As I said, there is no problem getting magazines from Mecgar for your pistol if you don't have any.

There is no cure for the hard to operate slide but there is a cure for how you go about hand cycling the slide. Retracting the slide can be a problem for many people....men and women. Here is the suggested method for cycling the slide manually for those that don't have the hand strength. If you are right handed place your left hand over the slide, toward the rear and squeeze with several fingers. Don't try to pull the slide back with the left hand. Instead, hold the pistol near your body and near your waist line. Now, press the grips/frame forward with your right hand while not moving your left hand. Don't try to do this with the pistol out and away from your body. Bring it in close, fingers off the trigger at all times of course. Safety set to safe...down position. This gives you maximum leverage for cycling the slide. Hold steady with the left hand, push with the right.

This is such an issue with many semi auto pistols that makers like S&W make an EZ model with small wings on the rear of the slide to aid in your grip. Of course small caliber pistols like .22 and .32 are not as powerful and don't require such a strong recoil spring. So, their slides are much easier to manipulate. Beautiful pistol. I don't know your situation but I can tell you than many, many people have sold a family firearm and regretted it the rest of their days. Only my son will get the firearms that belonged to my Dad....I won't sell even one. 1917
 

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Balogh, if you read through the thread it is obvious ***** is not really familiar with Walther pistols or even the various calibers regarding ammo. Not everyone is. That is why I was asking about the .25 ACP clip (magazine????)....looks like she has a nice old 1911 magazine .... We have plenty of Members asking about the marks on the barrel at the ejection port. As you and I know that isn't the barrel but the frame. People who come here will learn something. I'm still learning all the time, especially when Polo Berst asks about something unusual or that interesting thread on the fake RMS. 1917
 

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We have plenty of Members asking about the marks on the barrel at the ejection port. As you and I know that isn't the barrel but the frame.
Yes, I know that. But that's not the point. I was rather wondering about the marking ".380". I can't find such a marking on the gun in question, can you?
 

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Discussion Starter #38
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Balogh, if you read through the thread it is obvious ***** is not really familiar with Walther pistols or even the various calibers regarding ammo. Not everyone is. That is why I was asking about the .25 ACP clip (magazine????)....looks like she has a nice old 1911 magazine .... We have plenty of Members asking about the marks on the barrel at the ejection port. As you and I know that isn't the barrel but the frame. People who come here will learn something. I'm still learning all the time, especially when Polo Berst asks about something unusual or that interesting thread on the fake RMS. 1917
I admit I am not very good with correct terminology. I rarely talk to anyone about firearms. My father's focus was proficiency, safety & self defense. The reason it was required to be able to load & fire everything he had. He also collected. I did a bit of pheasant hunting by my grandson now has my shotgun.
 

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I did unfortunately. The magazine wouldn't work with anything. The 380 magazines don't have any marks on them except the caliber.
The mag on the left is almost certainly for a Savage semi-auto Model 1917. The guns themselves aren't common, so there isn't much demand for the mags either.
I wouldn't start throwing things away until you are absolutely certain that there aren't some unidscovered guns someplace.
And I'll take the Savage mag off your hands if you have no use for it.
Moon
 
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