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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Out of curiosity I measured the recoil springs in five different .22 caliber PP-series pistols of German (Manurhin/Walther) manufacture. Two of them, in a PPK made in 1968, and in a PP dated 1984, are known to be the original springs because I purchased the pistols new. A third, in a surplus British contract s/n 41693, undated--is believed to be original as the pistol was near-new and appears unissued. The remaining two pistols were purchased used and whether the recoil springs are in fact the originals cannot be verified, though probably they are. These are a PPK/s made in 1981 and a PP-Sport dated 1963. All of these springs appear normal and only slightly "set" when compared to new ones. I would conclude, therefore, that they are representative of serviceable springs for those models. Functioning is excellent in all five guns.

In all but one, the springs were closed on both ends and ground flat on the rear end only. The PPK/s spring was ground flat on both ends. Probably Walther felt it was unnecessary to grind the front coil, since the spring seat inside the slide at the front is not flat anyway, and the round cross-section of the spring may be a better fit.

None of the springs was ground on the rear outside circumference as often seen on PPK and PPKs .380s. This is because PP frames are not counter-bored for the spring on the front face of the barrel boss, and on the PPK and PPK/s (which are counterbored) the spring wire is of smaller diameter than .380s and already has adequate clearance in the counterbore. Also the .22 barrel is smaller in diameter than .380, so there is additional clearance between the spring and the slide.

An obvious difference is the length. All the PP recoil springs were 5-7/8" long (more or less, within 1/8" of each other. This is expected from varied amounts of use, the differences being inconsequential. The PP Sport spring is NOT longer (its slide is the standard length). However, both the PPK and PPK/s springs were only about 4" long, also within 1/8".

The PP springs were made from wire about 1.05mm (about .042") diameter; with 22 coils (about 20+ active).

The PPK and PPK/s springs both were about 0.95mm (about .037") diameter wire, with 13 coils (about 11+ active).

Several spare springs of unknown provenance also were measured, and these conformed to the ones above.

All of these springs have a larger diameter at the front than at the rear. All models: front, roughly 15.7mm; rear ranged from 13.2mm to 14.1mm, not particularly critical, merely affecting how tightly that particular spring grips the barrel to keep it from falling off when the slide is dismounted.

It is entirely possible that original springs of other dimensions may be encountered as this is a very limited sample, but if a given spring approximates the above, it's probably an original spring. (And likely does not need replacement).

M
 

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Good info Mike. I was always wondering why the .22 PPK & PPK/s springs have a smaller dia coil and your measurements confirm. Maybe it has something to do with the reduced mass of the shorter slides compared to the longer and heavier PP slides for slamming the extra mass against the trigger guard.
Anyway, all of my .22 springs that are installed and on hand as spares are closed & ground on both ends. This is for the PP, PPK & PPK/s .22's. None are 'not ground' on either end. And these are genuine German Walther springs that I have pulled from .22 pistols (and ones of my own) because people wanted them changed and thought they might be weak and requested a Wolff replacement. I kept them all as spares.
 

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Aargh... It has to bite me. Ash onto my head. Who's competent in reading is a step further on. I only found this one. Credits ones again!
 

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Mike...if you measure the OD of the "coil" of the various coil springs....we can determine the "spring-rate" or spring-constant ....expressed in lbs/in. If we also have the full-compressed length (or the compressed length, equivalent to the rear-most position of the slide)...we can determine the "lbs" force at this compressed condition.

We can use this software used for Pontiac racing-car coil springs....as the "science" used to determine spring rate is the same... just that the size for guns is much smaller....

http://www.pontiacracing.net/js_coil_spring_rate.htm

I think it would make for an interesting exercise,comparing the various PP, PPK and caliber variations......

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EDIT..... from the quoted link you provided for the .32 vs .380 springs, the spring rartes for these are:

.32 cal --> 2.5 lbs/in
.380 cal---> 4.01 lbs/in

In both cases, I took an OD "average" diameter,as these show different numbers front/rear.
 

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The Iver Johnson TP 22 is a Walther clone, What are the chances that the parts will interchange, including the spring ?
 

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As I show in my link on how to calculate spring rates.... would need to measure and compare......for both fit and strength.
 

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Mike,
As much information as you have posted here, you need your own book. Walther Specs (the ins & outs). Thanks again. Always good stuff. ~J
 
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