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Just received a Walther PP from a friend who's husband just passed. Don't have a clue about these pistols. Carl Walther Waffenfabrik Ulm/Do. Model PP 9mm kurz. Made in West Germany right under the mag release. Nazi eagle Crest stamped in several places. The serial # is 24505 A. On both grip frame and slide. Anyone might know when it was manufactured? Value? It's in excellent condition. No pitting or rust anywhere. The grips are excellent as well. Blueing also in great shape. Thanks for any help.
 

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Pics are the best way to give you an honest answer. Off the mark, though, no Ulm-produced weapon ever came from the factory with nazi eagle crests.

Is there an 'antler' stamp and a two-digit number on the barrel? Might be the year, but then again, pics explain more than 999 words could.
 

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Is there an 'antler' stamp and a two-digit number on the barrel? Might be the year, but then again, pics explain more than 999 words could.
The two-digit numer is, to be precise, not the year itself, but the date code. Furthermore, the date code of an Ulm PP series gun is not stamped on the barrel, but generally on the frame. On the barrel itself it's only the nitro proof mark that can be found (near the muzzle).
 

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OK, I would have thought it was a '67 date as he has in the pics. Looks to be a nice .380 PP. Those eagles are the postwar proof marks. As I understand them, they originally came with a box, extra mag, cleaning rod and target that had the date on it. There are a lot of good references on this site, it is a good firearm. Value is subjective, as much depends on condition (always need more pics), where it is, and what accessories it has coming with it. Some (1 mag, used, not too special) could go for between 600-800, YMMV! I am sure experts will jump in to correct me-
 

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1967. Btw: It's not the year of made but the year of proof. But yes, it's mostly the same year.
 

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The 67 Walther PP, like his, came from the factory. As Mr. "Matthane" mentioned with these accessories, only a small detail was missing, since it also came with a small tool that is used to disarm the firing ping.

The price as the forista companions have told you will depend a lot on the state of the weapon and if you keep it with the accessories that were mentioned: original box coinciding with the serial number of the weapon, factory test target also coinciding with the number of the weapon, bronze cleaning rod, a pair of magazines, one with finger rest, User Manual and the mentioned tool. It also helps to know the history of the weapon - this is how many people the weapon belonged to before reaching your hands.

If everything were perfect, this is a 100% preserved blue polish as well as the interior of the barrel a polished mirror without pitting. Its current price may well be between US $ 1,000 minimum to US $ 2,500 maximum, in the US market. (You can check it in Gunbroker).

The international price of its Walther PP New boxed, "ulm" from the 1960s and 1970s, which are usually the best finished of the Posguerrra production. If its state is new, which uses the initials (NIB) in optimal conditions with a 100% blue finish, it is U $ S 1200. It may be worth a little more.

Like everything one sells or buys, too, you have to find an informed buyer, collector, expert, or enthusiast who values your piece.


It is a beautiful pistol. Maybe you want to keep it. It is an excellent weapon for your defense or your home and belonged to your friend. Surely your friend would be happy to keep it, value it and treasure it as he did so that it is as it seems after so many years. He does not believe?.
92435
 

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As I understand them, they originally came with a box, extra mag, cleaning rod and target that had the date on it.
Some of the test target sheets are dated. But I'd say that most of them aren't.

As Mr. "Matthane" mentioned with these accessories, only a small detail was missing, since it also came with a small tool that is used to disarm the firing ping.
I'm not sure if there was really a firing pin removal tool in each box during the Sixties. I usually take them out of the boxes anyway because I fear they might scratch the gun's surface. So I have about a dozen of these tools in my collection but I own far more PP series guns from that mentioned time period. Furthermore, on the internet we find many examples of pristine packages that include everything but the tool. This circumstance may be another hint that these tools weren't necessarily present in every box.

Tool.jpg
 

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Yep, most test targets are not dated. But yes, the tool was a usual addition to every PP-series gun until early 70', when Walther changed to plastic box and plastic cleaning rod.
 
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Some of the test target sheets are dated. But I'd say that most of them aren't.
From my experience all test targets came with the serial number of the weapon and the signature of the shooter who ran the test.
This is logical, since the objective of the factory test is intended to give certainty of the precision of the specific weapon, otherwise it would not make sense. Precisely, the test target identified with the serial number of the weapon and the signature or signature of the shooter is a guarantee of quality. That it was also a common practice in quality weapons at that time.

In addition, I believe that it not only gave proof of precision but also of good performance of the weapon when it left the factory to be marketed.

Unfortunately, this practice has now been lost, in part because consumers do not value it.

Although the precision of the impacts on the test target depended largely on the shooter's spirit, it was a detail of quality and seriousness from the manufacturer, which for me is of great value.

By the way, an expert shooter can surely improve the precision obtained in the factory test target, but it was a guarantee that at least that precision was proven by the factory.

Today, personally, I only know a pistol that comes with its box with a test objective, but this is made with a computer, for each pistol and identified with the serial number of each weapon, and it is the CZ SP01 Shadow Pistol.
Surely there are more weapons that bring it too, but today it is a rarity.
Although I understand that a professional shooter can surely overcome the precision results obtained in the factory test objective. I've done it and I'm just an experienced shooter.
The aim of the objective was to give a certainty of quality and certainty that at least in practice the weapon had been tested, in 15 meters some and others at 25 meters.

Health to everyone
92442
 

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@Balogh : Perhaps Alexia wants one of your 'olive forks' ;)

This is a complete set except shown loaded mag and the holster =>

92443
 
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Surely there are more weapons that bring it too, but today it is a rarity.
So it seems that most of my recent acquisitions of contemporary guns already show some signs of rarity. ;)

The aim of the objective was to give a certainty of quality and certainty that at least in practice the weapon had been tested, in 15 meters some and others at 25 meters.
Speaking of a certain quality... in Switzerland, the SIG P210 were test fired at 50 metres.
 

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Yep, most test targets are not dated. But yes, the tool was a usual addition to every PP-series gun until early 70', when Walther changed to plastic box and plastic cleaning rod.
What about the Manurhin branded guns of the Fifties and the Sixties? Is it possible that they were sold without the removal tool? This would give me a plausible explanation for the discrepancy in the number of tools in my collection.
 

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I do not know but imo it's the same. Do you believe that's the difference? The Manurhin's I've hold in my hands had mostely an 'olive fork'. But for what is true, I do not know.
 

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I can't remember which boxes I took the removal tools from. Usually I take them out immediately at the moment when I have the box in my hands for the very first time. My latest Manurhin addition I can pick up in the next fews days is a 1984 PPK/S that won't answer the question anyway. I'll keep my eyes open.
 

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The only way... ;)
 

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This is a complete set except shown loaded mag and the holster
Mister Martin, beautiful complete set, I congratulate you!

I find it interesting, the furniture, on which the gun is. It looks like an old "Petit bureau secretaire francaise" I love small antique furniture, with model work and fine woods, such as oak, walnut and other fine woods that are no longer seen these days.
They are Masterpieces like our beloved Walthers.

If you'd like, I'd like to enjoy viewing some photos from your entire desktop. If you are at ease, of course.
Best regards
 

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Hey Alexia, we've talking about guns. Let's see, what left ;)
 
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