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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recieved all four parts for my extractor and now after 15 or twenty tries and a very sore thumb, I am about ready to give up. I watched U Tube videos on disassembly and assembly of the slide I think I have it right but the spring is just to strong to get the parts in. I could sure use some advice before I turn it over to a gunsmith!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I NEED INFORMATION !

I recieved all four parts for my extractor and now after 15 or twenty tries and a very sore thumb, I am about ready to give up. I watched U Tube videos on disassembly and assembly of the slide I think I have it right but the spring is just to strong to get the parts in. I could sure use some advice before I turn it over to a gunsmith!
Has anyone some advice for me? You guy's know your Walthers that's for sure but has anyone here ever removed or replaced their extractor? If so or not Please respond. Am I asking in the wrong group, or should I just abandon hope that I will get a response from this forum? Just an answer!
 

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Has anyone some advice for me? You guy's know your Walthers that's for sure but has anyone here ever removed or replaced their extractor? If so or not Please respond. Am I asking in the wrong group, or should I just abandon hope that I will get a response from this forum? Just an answer!
From what I remember, the firing pin, safety lever and extractor are all tied in together. It was easier with the slide off with those parts removed. Then reasasemble from extractor to safety lever to firing pin.
 

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Has anyone some advice for me? You guy's know your Walthers that's for sure but has anyone here ever removed or replaced their extractor? If so or not Please respond. Am I asking in the wrong group, or should I just abandon hope that I will get a response from this forum? Just an answer!
Puzzled how your post apparently fell between the cracks and went unanswered.

Removal and reinstallation of the extractor is covered pretty thoroughly here: https://www.waltherforums.com/forum/faq-pp-tp/12187-dismounting-safety-pp-series-pistols.html

It's easiest for first-timers to accomplish it by removing the safety first.

M
 

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Yeah I hate it when that happens and although rare it does happen. Then of course there are those that ask, you prepare a careful answer, sometimes with photos and never hear from them again. Just the way forums work sometimes but it seems the OP really did need a helping hand. 1917
 

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I didn't notice that GunShow 70 was back yesterday asking. I'm sure I have pictures of this that will likely help. I'm very visual....you can talk all day. I have to see pictures. I think they were way back there with regard to the safety rotating on someone's PP. The photos aren't on the laptop....I'll have to dig em out of the big computer. If that doesn't work I'll just make some new ones. 1917




Meanwhile I've determined how to mount a Shield SMSc to the thin, zinc slide of a P22. I can now use the top of my glasses to place the 4 MOA red dot on target.....well tighter groups than minute of squirrel. Gotta do something while social distancing. Might put one on a PP next.
 

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OK, where were we? Oh yeah, installing the detent pin, spring, extractor pusher and extractor on a .32 PP pistol. Above is how the extractor should fit against the slide when properly installed. What holds it in position is a spring in a hole that presses a rear pin against the safety drum and a properly positioned extractor pusher pin on the front end. What you are looking at behind the rear of the extractor is the long hood of the front end of the piece that presses against the extractor. It must be positioned correctly. You can stick your finger inside the slide and you should be able to smoothly pivot the extractor tip in and out.



Here are the parts out of the pistol. Take note again or the arrangement of parts on the extractor spring. The rear end fits into detents on the safety drum and makes it click into the fire or safe position. The front end pushes against the outer rear area of the extractor causing it to pivot in. Note how the longer nose of the extractor pin is positioned against the rear of the extractor. It only fits this way. That nose is what you are seeing in the first photo, right behind the extractor.



There are two ways to reinstall the firing pin, ejector spring, and safety drum. An easy way and a hard way. Above is the hard way. The safety drum has to be shoved in from the left side. But two things are in the way. The firing pin and the detent pin at the rear of the extractor spring. It is pretty easy to press the firing pin forward so that the rear of it clears the nose of the safety drum but then you run into the detent pin that is spring loaded to be in the way if you have already assembled the extractor. Since the safety drum fills all of the circular space....leaving no easy access to the rear of the detent pin....pull the extractor and let the pressure off the whole thing so the pin can be shoved forward and into the hole it rides in and out of the way of the safety drum. Now press the firing pin forward, wiggle the safety drum in until seated then let the rear of the firing pin spring back against and into the safety drum. Note, at this point the safety should be easy to rotate with no snapping into safe or fire positions.



Now for the easy part. Take a look at the photo above. What is wrong with the extractor pin as shown? It is not oriented properly. It needs to be rotated so that the long nose is facing the outside of the slide. The flat side faces the inside of the slide. OK, rotate it and make sure it stays there. I should note that before doing this I usually like to press the nose rearward a bit so the assembly will engage the safety drum detents. I then rotate the safety to make sure all is well up to this point.



Now with the whole extractor spring assembly in the hole and with the nose properly oriented, simply place the rear leg of the extractor in the groove provided for the extractor. While holding it down press it rearward against the extractor spring assembly. It should not be hard to slide it rearward. If it is you need to make sure you have the right parts, and that the parts are not damaged. The spring on mine fit pretty tightly over the rear detent plunger. Make sure that part is fully seated into the spring. Fitment of these parts isn't sloppy loose but they aren't tight either. Press the extractor rearward against the nose of the forward part until the rear leg drops into the hole provided for it. The photo above shows the extractor almost home. All I need to do is press it just a little bit more rearward and then down into the slide. The nose piece will snap into place against it. Stick you finger inside the slide and check for smooth movement of the extractor. Then reassemble the slide onto the pistol...load and fire.

Should have gotten the good camera out and some proper lighting but I just got new batteries for my 10 year old Canon SX 280 12 meg point and shoot and wanted to try it out for old times sake. 1917
 

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This is wonderful even if there is no such word as "orientated".

I don't have any difficulty doing it what you term the "hard" way, using a dental pick to depress the safety detent plunger, but to each his own. The "easy" way works too, for some people better, but I have trouble keeping the extractor plunger oriented. It keeps wanting to rotate out of position.

M
 

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This is wonderful even if there is no such word as "orientated".

I don't have any difficulty doing it what you term the "hard" way, using a dental pick to depress the safety detent plunger, but to each his own. The "easy" way works too, for some people better, but I have trouble keeping the extractor plunger oriented. It keeps wanting to rotate out of position.

M
I'll fix that. Wording of the whole post is a bit off and needs rewriting. I need an editor. :) 1917
 

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153

Is that the mythical tool everyone seeks to own? Or the thing at scratches up pistols left in the box that got thrown away because we hate scratches? Just kidding. I have never seen one in the flesh. Lots of pictures, but never in hand. It seems to be the holy grail for Walther collectors. A bamboo chopstick whittled down to the proper shape does the trick for me.

Duncan
 

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I got the fork with my first pistol a .380 PPK/S and another with my second pistol a .32 PPK and have used them from time to time. They are easy to loose and work as intended. They show up on eBay on occasion.

These days I make every effort to avoid taking my Walther pistols completely apart, so they serve only to complete the box/accessories.
 

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153,

I agree that never taking a pistol completely apart is a good thing. If a problem arises that is down in the guts it's time for a qualified gunsmith. The olive fork was included in earlier PP models, so I think Walther considered its use by the owner a doable action. However, the actions the fork assists in can be done with other tools everyone has, or can make. I would like to have one, but I'm cheap, so I make one when needed, plus my bamboo one doesn't scratch.

Duncan
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
the fork?

I got the fork with my first pistol a .380 PPK/S and another with my second pistol a .32 PPK and have used them from time to time. They are easy to loose and work as intended. They show up on eBay on occasion.

These days I make every effort to avoid taking my Walther pistols completely apart, so they serve only to complete the box/accessories.
How is the fork used? what does it look like? what would a whittled down bamboo chopstick look like. I was shooting my PP near dark in the woods when the whole extractor system blew off my pistol and onto the matted woods landscape, impossible to locate any parts. I have tried putting the the extractor parts in while the safety drum was removed but couldn't get the detent part pushed out of the way which is hard because of the pointed end is so hard to control it slips off all my tools. If I put the safety back in and load up from the front the spring fights me so hard that I can't get the parts to load all the way to seat, and bruising my thumb. So maybe I need different tools to push back the detent part while I re-insert the safety. You guy's have come up with great suggestions I feel I am close to success just a little more help!
 

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Gunshow,

I'll jump in on this, the "olive fork" is a two pronged tool that assists in removing the firing pin and loaded chamber pin a springs in the slide. My whittled bamboo does the same thing. Just a tool to compress the springs, which greatly helps remove these parts. Once done the safety/decocker can then be removed. This gives you room to get to the parts you are working on.

1917 gave instructions on how to to install the extractor/safety plunger group, so follow those. You should now have the "group" and safety/decocker in place on you slide. Replace the loaded chamber indicator and spring, watching the orientation of the spring and the little leg on it (leg to the top of slide). Replace firing pin and spring and your done. The Fork or stick just give you better leverage. Just make sure extractor plunger is facing the proper way. There are several posts on this a few years back which really goes into detail. Do a search and you should be able to find them. When you have everything out of your slide it's a good time to clean and lightly lube all those holes and parts before reassembly. Also, there are a couple of YouTube videos that are good. Good luck.

Duncan

P.S. I was just looking around and Numrick is closed down due the N.Y.'s C 19 response. No shipping, but taking U.S. requests for back order when they get going again.

.
 

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A bamboo skewer filed to a narrow chisel edge will compress the firing pin spring very nicely. The flat end of another skewer will push the firing pin forward of the safety drum. The flat side of a small jeweler's screwdriver will ably press the safety detent into its hole.

Electrical tape will cover the sides of the slide to prevent scratches while you're working on it, and when it's clamped in your padded bench vise (you never know when some stray metal filing is stuck on a vise jaw).

You don't have a vise? You have no business working on guns.

M
 

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Dang, that is a little part that is hard to find a picture of. I've never seen one in person either.

The reason I suggest putting the ejector together the way I did is that my old German police pistol has several radial ridges that have worn into it. They are small and once the part is in place it turns smoothly....but, any side wise pressure against it from the firing pin or ejector plunger causes it to immediately bind. I could polish the part but don't want to. Holding the firing pin away from it allows me to wiggle it back and forth while rotating it a bit until it seats all the way into the slide.

I think it should be understood that there is not tremendous spring pressure associated with the extractor assembly. At least I've not experienced any. Mike's comment about properly orienting the nose on the front of assembly is valid...that thing is small and can easily rotate out of position. But get it right and pressing the extractor rearward should not require a lot of force. I'm not sure why the OP was having issues saying that the spring was too strong to compress. I expect something was more likely not aligned or perhaps the spring was not seated on the rear plunger. Internet diagnosis....tricky. Especially with new members that might not really understand much of the basic function of parts in their firearm. 1917
 

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Dear Distinguished Sir "1917-1911", I write these lines, to congratulate you for your excellent didactic explanation, that only a Master Gunsmith and expert in Walther PP Series can do.

His explanation is masterful and his photos are so illustrative and comprehensive, that more than a contribution in a forum thread, it is worthy of being part of a Best Seller Walther PP workshop.

Really 1917-1911, THANK YOU! for their generosity in sharing their knowledge. It takes time to take the photos, and masterfully explain, making what is difficult seem easy.

I have enjoyed reading your explanations and the opportune interventions of the other foristas like Mr. Dunkanppk and the other foristas who participate in this thread.

Best regards
Luck
 
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