Walther Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone, after waiting for a few years to find a Walther PPK, this never happened, perhaps I must clarify that I live in a small country where the offers of weapons, to be frank, the position of a small country is very small and for our passion even more difficult. Considering also that they are very very expensive, for our purchasing power.

The closest I got, in years, was a Walther PP, from the year 1938,
7.65 mm caliber (32 ACP), preserved with 97% of its original blued, it had a lot of use but well, it was a prewar Civilian version, with its original box, matching serial with the pistol, with two magazines, functional, and the manual paperwork for use, the target was missing with the factory shooting tests. the box also contained the aluminum box with the relief engraving of the original Zella Meris factory and kept the original flannel as well as the bottle of oil and other cleaning accessories, missing only the cleaning rod. It was very complete for a pristine Pistol. It turned out bad because the inside of the spout was extremely pitted, very rusty. This is for me unforgivable and I returned it, not without first trying it in the range, without fail.
*
I recently bought a 1971 Walther PP, at 380 ACP, NIB. no import marks. with a beautiful fine blue polish, which is now impossible to see in any current manufactured weapon.
*I would like to send you photos, but quarantine is not possible at the moment.
I tell you that it does not seem to have been shot before me, it came with the factory target matching the serial number as well as its particular original box, a small tool, its two original magazines as well as all the factory paperwork.

I bought in Europe two pairs of French walnut quality grips, one segregated with the Walther banner and another exclusive walnut root heald.

I am an experienced shooter and was pleasantly surprised by the little recoil, I don't understand the complaints of recoil at 380 ACP? Perhaps it is because the PP has less setback than the PPK / S.
The first shot in DA, although it is approximately 12 pounds o more, is also very short, which greatly diminished the feeling and seemed much less hard than it is, the SA was clean, without friction and sharp, which allowed me to shoot very fast. . I loved ! :)
So I confirmed that the choice was correct.

It is a very portable pistol, which I can carry in my pocket or on my waist, comfortably, since it is very flat, without protrusions.
It is ideal to extract fast and instinctive shot, to the old school, this is from the hip, with one hand. This does not mean that it can also be used for shooting at 25 yards.

I also do not understand why PP is not appreciated so much, over the other versions, PPK / S and PPK, because the only difference between PP and PPK / S is only 0.6 inches longer, this is nothing. And it allows you to get the most power out of the marginal 380 ACP. in addition to less recoil for having the heavier slide. Also having a greater sliding space for the spring, makes it more reliable and less demanding on ammunition. And the greater distance between sights, is also an advantage to shoot.

Just a thought: I think then that it is only a marketing issue, because in fact, the Walther PPK / S, should have been called PP / S, because in reality it is a Walther PP, shorter (0.6 inches) , but the name PPK, seduces, by James Bonde, then it was named Walther PPK / S.

I love all the PP Series, this is: PP, PPk / S and PPK. they are beautiful. And I prefer them over any small 380 ACP of current manufacture. I had a Glock 42, good pistol, smaller and lighter. But it stuck, I had to polish the convex access surface to the chamber and requested since then it has been 100% reliable.
Today's weapons of manufacture all need to fire at least 300 rounds to finish settling and so if they are reliable.
The classic Walthers PP series are reliable from the start.
This is also a pistol, all made of the best quality forged steel, with segmented required parts, with a fixed barrel, with a polished blue, mirror that is a delight to watch, a military and police record of reliability of 89 years! full of history and mystique. A DA / SA design that personally gives me security, like a revolver to carry a safe bullet in the chamber, things that Glock 42 does not give me, I always feared that it would shoot to carry it dancing in my pocket and I could not shoot so fast like the Walther PP.
What else to ask for, in addition to having an excellent quality weapon, you have the plus of all its history and hundreds of articles and comments to read about it. A weapon to use and to admire.

Can someone explain to me, with technical arguments, why the Walther PP is out of date?
Please don't tell me because of the weight, because, that allows me to lessen the recoil in an exquisitely balanced and beautiful design.

I appreciate your appreciations, from the dear specialists and experts at Walthers.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
That looks like a really fine example! Congratulations!

I love old guns, and I love old cars. My newest car was made in 1981, and my oldest in 1966. There is nothing being made today that I would rather drive, so I stick with my old cars, because I prefer them.

But I acknowledge that technology has advanced a lot since 1981, and newer cars are objectively better in almost every way. There are drawbacks to many of these improvements, but I would be kidding myself if I didn’t acknowledge that newer cars are safer, handle better, stop better, and are more efficient.

The same is true of guns. As much as we might admire the classic designs that date from before WWII, objectively speaking, modern ‘plastic’ guns are better in almost every way.

But just as you won’t find a new car in MY garage, you won’t find a new gun in MY safe. My old cars get the job done with style and passion that new cars could never have, and the same is true of my old guns.

If your PP is a tool for self-defense, you could do a LOT better. But if it’s something to collect and enjoy in a sporting manner, it’s perfect. And if you wind up using it as a defensive tool, it will certainly still get the job done reasonably well.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,837 Posts
That looks like a really fine example! Congratulations!

I love old guns, and I love old cars. My newest car was made in 1981, and my oldest in 1966. There is nothing being made today that I would rather drive, so I stick with my old cars, because I prefer them.

But I acknowledge that technology has advanced a lot since 1981, and newer cars are objectively better in almost every way. There are drawbacks to many of these improvements, but I would be kidding myself if I didn’t acknowledge that newer cars are safer, handle better, stop better, and are more efficient.

The same is true of guns. As much as we might admire the classic designs that date from before WWII, objectively speaking, modern ‘plastic’ guns are better in almost every way.

But just as you won’t find a new car in MY garage, you won’t find a new gun in MY safe. My old cars get the job done with style and passion that new cars could never have, and the same is true of my old guns.

If your PP is a tool for self-defense, you could do a LOT better. But if it’s something to collect and enjoy in a sporting manner, it’s perfect. And if you wind up using it as a defensive tool, it will certainly still get the job done reasonably well.
Very well said Mike. You've summed it up about as well as I've ever heard it summed up.

I'll maybe just add it's typically more what a person can do with a gun than some technical superiority of the gun itself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Dear Pantera Mike and Jimmo952, I deeply thank you for your excellent answers!, I have delighted reading them both, it is a pleasure to read opinions of people with so much knowledge and beauty of expression.
I confess to you that my original idea, in my purchase of my beautiful Walther PP, was to buy a pistol, which did honor to all the masters of the old school, in an exquisite creative design, which I personally enjoy a lot, to admire, use it exporadically in range and circumstantially use it in my defense.

*I usually carry a 2-inch Smith & Wesson Model 60, 357 Mag. Stainless steel, and rarely carry a Colt Cobra cal. 32 S% W Long, that despite its low caliber and only being 2 inches, I can hit the center of the target at 25 yards and shoot it very fast. And my house is covered with a 4-inch pristine Colt 38 Special, NIB that retains its original numbered box franked by a CZ P01 Shadow. 18 + 1 9mm Parabellum.

But my queen is a Browgning 22 Lr. "Challenger" model, with gold trigger, beautiful walnut root grip, with its box and factory accessories. This pistol, is more than excellent, it is a gem where you look at it. He has passed thousands of shots through it, I have hunted hares more than 50 meters and I used to hit a 1 cent coin 25 yards, when I was younger and my eyesight was better.

This Browgning 22 lr. It has a strong affective value for me, because my late dad chose it and advised its importation to my country, and that particular piece was chosen by my late mom along with my dad. So it is very important to me, other than that I love it and create it the best 22 lr pistol. best made of all time. even better than the famous Colt Woodsman.

One night I lost it in the field, it was at a distance of 10 km. I had no idea where. I knelt down and prayed to God to help me find her, with only a flashlight in my hand I walked the field at night and found her! , It was a miracle.

What Jimmo52 says is very true, according to what the prominent deceased, doctor of my country, expert ballistics writer "Dr. Gonzalo Fernandez" says in his books: "An experienced shooter makes fatal impacts with a 22 long Rifle .. . "
By the way, as you surely know better than me, the Armed Forces of England, in times of the "Cold War" bought Walther PP pistols, caliber 22 lr. to be used "for personal defense" of plainclothes troops operating in Northern Ireland.

*Thanks Pantera Mike, for helping me put things in their true place.
Well, my original idea was to have her to just admire her, clean her, and sometimes take her to the rank and eventually use her for my defense. I believe that our beloved Walther PP, will more than fulfill his work and will know if it is necessary to defend my life.

Both did me a lot of good, THANK YOU, because the figures that question the 380 ACP, and the criticism of our beloved Walher labeling her as obsolete, tormented me. You put those fears away and put the thing in its right place.
Luck !
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,356 Posts
You have quite a nice collection, Alexia. Might we ask where you are, and how difficult is it for civilians to possess arms?
Concur with much of your affection for the PP series, but agree with Mike that there are better modern alternatives. I've found the G42 to be dead reliable, and have taken brand new ones straight to a shooting match. But if you're going to put it in your pocket, get or make a pocket holster that fully covers the triggerguard.
Too, there's no guilt in beating up new guns, preserving that wonderful bluing on the older examples.
Someone fired that prewar PP with corrosive ammunition, which draws moisture to its residue. I have an '08 Colt like that; luckily, I was able to replace the barrel.
Moon
 
  • Like
Reactions: 153

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Mr. Luna, hello? Thanks for the compliment, but I think four little pistols do not make up a collection in any country in the world, dear friend Luna.
I only have the best I could have after a lifetime of work and study.

*It is my passion of my life and hobby that has accompanied me in moments of solitude, giving me happiness and security. Feelings, that only those who share this passion for the taste for good weapons and study and delight trying to discover the masterful designs of Master Gunsmiths such as Firtz Walther, Horace Smith, John Moses Browning and Samuel Colt, to name some of the most prominent. They can understand.

By the way, this passion for the Weapons Master has nothing to do, at least that's how I have lived it, since my childhood, with violence, quite the opposite. It is really the search for perfection of an ingenious machine that has accompanied the human being forever.

There is a phrase that is attributed to the famous Master Gunsmith, Samuel Colt that says "God created man and Colt made them equal" to think about it.

To be a legitimate owner of firearms, you must meet many very demanding requirements, fitness, undergo tests of fitness, physical fitness, psychological fitness, good citizenship and more. These permits are periodic and very rigorous.

Concerning your favorable comment on the Glock 42, it is a great pistol.
*I knew I had a new one just out of the box, I solved it easily by polishing the ramp that takes the ammunition to the chamber and it was 100% reliable.
I didn't feel safe with just 4 pounds of trigger without any insurance. The trigger lock is the most illogical thing I've ever seen. Well, the slightest mistake or oversight is precisely, inadvertently, pressing the trigger. the so-called "trigger lock" does not serve the purpose of providing security.

On the other hand, perhaps in a Service pistol, it can be useful because they use a rigid holster. But a pistol intended for pocket use, although you can use a Santini holster for your pants pocket. A pocket pistol must be secure enough to be carried directly into a pocket safely. This is not the case with the Glock 42.

Also I didn't feel safe with the 380 ACP round.
Maybe you are wondering, then why a Walther PP?, Because the Walther PP, has a Double Action, like a revolver in the first shot, which gives me a lot of assurance that I am not going to shoot it by mistake and the 380 ACP round, I know that it is marginal for defense, but instead it gives me a fixed barrel and a larger pipe of almost 4 inches, which allows us to obtain greater precision than the Glock 42, as well as taking the marginal 380 ACP, all the braking potential that is possible.
**In addition to the beauty of a beautiful design built with old school mastery, this is excellent forged steel, quality machined, and top quality blue finish. That with a set of grips from the Czech Republic, from walnut root carved into the Walther banner, make up a Masterpiece, don't you think Luna?

The Walther PP gives you 89 years of history, with all the mystique that it was the weapon carried by the Luftwaffe Pilots in the Second World War; the famous Italo - American cantane, Frank Sinatra, wore a beautifully engraved Walther PP, made in ulm, Germany that was auctioned.

The Gun that famous actor Sean Connery used to star in the world famous fictional spy James Bond in his first famous episode of "Dr. No", was a Walther PP, not a Walther PPK as it is named. It was auctioned for more than US $ 100,000.

Also the immortal "King of Rock" Elvis Presley, also had among his most precious collection a Walther PPK / S engraved in silver, manufactured in 1974, in a German ULM factory, like mine, with the initials "TCB" which means Take Care your Business, as he used to put to the arms of his possession.

In short, the Walther PP is more than a pistol, it is a Masterpiece, full of stories.
Perhaps the best story is yours.
Luck !
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Mister Halfmoonclip, excuse me, where it says Mr Luna, I should have written Mr Moon.
This happens to me when I write half asleep late at night.
Sorry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Mr. Halfmoonclip, you're right, I thought with the rust inside the barrel, caused by old corrosive ammunition.
How lucky! I congratulate you that you were able to change the barrel and rescue that beautiful Colt 1908.
By the way, is it a "Hammerless 1908" model or a "Vesp Pocket 1908"?
Both are beautiful pieces. As you know, the Colt Hammerless 1908, is the pistol that was officially delivered to the General Lords in the US, until a few years old. It is currently in production and is included in the current offer of the factory, it is very expensive, it comes out US $ 2,500 with a rather important wait.
But I suspect that some pieces that are difficult or very expensive to manufacture are MIN pieces and not forged and machined like pristines like yours.

Here it is very difficult to see one, I only saw a very deteriorated one in an armory and I never saw another one again. So you are very lucky to own one. Maybe you can upload some photos, so I can enjoy watching it.

I think I mentioned to you that it is extremely difficult to be a legitimate owner of weapons and, by the way, you have to pass rigorous tests of suitability in the handling of firearms, as well as demonstrate solvency, in various civil aspects, not having a criminal record, passing rigorous tests. psychological and psychophysical.
And many more requirements that I do not want to bore you.

Luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Sounds like California's licensing laws to me::). Alexia welcome to the forum. Your PP is one of the nicest looking I have seen. I usually shy away from engraved handguns, but yours is a beautiful example.

Duncan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks Dunkanppk, for your nice words, I'm glad you liked the photo, it belongs to the gun that Frank Sinatra used to carry in California.

It is a pleasure to participate in this prestigious forum and again thanks Dunkan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Alexia, my experience with a Walther PP in 380 Auto was much less satisfactory than yours. I found the recoil unpleasant as the tang was hurting the web of my hand. My 32 Auto PPK is much more pleasant to shoot.

I infer from the content of your messages that you live in Argentina. Please do not complain too much about the laws there. Over here, in Europe, it is virtually impossible to obtain a carry permit (the Czech Republic being an exception).

Disfrute de su arma!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Dear European Mr, hello, thanks for sharing your experience.
Perhaps the difference is this small detail that makes the difference: When I take the pistol I always have to do it with my thumb down.
This is the correct way to grab a gun.
It comes naturally to me, to grab any gun. It is a good habit.
Take the test and see what happens to the menbrane on your skin between your thumb and index finger. That is the difference that the gun will bite your skin or not.

I have never complained in this forum of the Laws, Mr European, I am an honest citizen of good customs, compliant with the Law; just answer the question of a forista.

It seems that you live in Belgium, the country of the "Fabrique Natonale d'armes de guerre Herstal Belgique Browning"

What can you tell me about the pistol made in Belgium of that brand, model model: "Challenger 22 lr"?

Just my 2 cents.
Luck !
 

Attachments

1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top