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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a NIB 2004 Walther P99 AS in 9mm. I have yet to fire it, but if I insert an empty magazine and pull the slide back, the slide locks rearward as it should. If I actuate the slide release, about 5% of the time the gun will be decocked after the slide slams forward.

Has anyone else seen this? Which part/parts are responsible for holding the striker back?

Did I get a lemon?
 

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Tabor,
I am not sure if you have a problem, but it is not a good idea letting the slide fly home without it picking up a bullet to load into the chamber. That's what we use "snap caps" for.

Your slide can do damage to the barrels chamber face when "slamming" home in this fashion.

I would get a snap cap and try your test again........this time with the gun performing as it was designed to do. Then you will know if the foreward force is jarring something loose it shouldn't.

When I release my slide in an unloaded gun, I always hold the slide and ease it home.


JF
 

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my 2004 p99 9mm also did something like that. it ended up being the cam that the trigger bar rides on. the cam was a few thousandths to short. i took out the cam and shimmed it with a piece of a .004 feeler gauge. worked great ever since. i did send it back to the factory, smith and walther sent it back to me saying that they could not find anything wrong with it. i fixed it myself and it works great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
[b said:
Quote[/b] (sniper350 @ May 07 2005,1:58)]Your slide can do damage to the barrels chamber face when "slamming" home in this fashion.

I would get a snap cap and try your test again........this time with the gun performing as it was designed to do. Then you will know if the foreward force is jarring something loose it shouldn't.
Sniper350,

What you say sounds logical, but I tend to think that if it was really a problem, Walther would have mentioned it in the owner's manual.

However, I chambered 90 rounds tonight and the striker stayed back every time.

If the striker didn't stay back when I was firing the gun, do you think this could result in a slam fire situation?
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] (sniper350 @ May 07 2005,11:58)]but it is not a good idea letting the slide fly home without it picking up a bullet to load into the chamber. That's what we use "snap caps" for.

Your slide can do damage to the barrels chamber face when "slamming" home in this fashion.
I don't think this statement is entirely true. I think it may have some truth for certain pistols, but I doubt the P99 is effected by this. I've had my P99's for years now and have constantly let the slide down on an empty chamber. I have yet to see any damage or any problems. And I have done this a lot.

Tabor,

You wouldn't get a slam fire situation. The striker is blocked and can only have access to the primer if the plate that blocks the striker is pushed up by the trigger mechanism.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
[b said:
Quote[/b] (P88 @ May 08 2005,12:11)]You wouldn't get a slam fire situation. The striker is blocked and can only have access to the primer if the plate that blocks the striker is pushed up by the trigger mechanism.
I know how this safety works, but it is deactivated when the trigger is all the way to the rear right? So I was worried that if I pull the trigger when I am firing the gun, and the slide closes while I still have the trigger back, and the striker does not stay back, I may have a possibility for a slam fire.
 

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P88,
I respect the fact that you have had no damage to your handgun "slamming" the slide home on an empty chamber.
But like my instructors have said to me " just because you skated by, doesn't make it correct or proper.

Plain and simple-- the slide is suppose to pick-up and load a round on its way to the chamber face. This action absorbs inertia and slows the slide down. Why would anyone knowingly place extra stresses onto their barrel chamber face or slide? Of course, it is your gun and you can treat it anyway you like----I am not trying to tell you how to operate your handgun, only make you aware of some better ways of handling it.

To answer the question " why isn't this covered in the manual"? I can only say that some things are left out of the manual..........like throwing you gun down on concrete. Walther doesn't list that as a thing to avoid. An extreme example , I know, but you get the point. Manuals are kept brief to keep costs down.....and your right, some things are just missed.

I can't tell you how many times I have seen gun owners of revolvers, slap their cylinders closed by slapping the handgun to the side causing the cylinder to close hard. Ask "any" Gunsmith that knows his/her craft and they will tell you that is wrong and potentially damaging to the revolver. But many do it and claim no damage ( sigh).

Back to the Semi-Auto......I suggested the use of Snap caps for your testing ( Tabor) because using "live" rounds can actually leave them "altered" No semi-auto rds should be cycled more then "twice" and if they are--- should be discarded ! This is advice from the ammo Manufacturers. What can happen is when the bullet is "slammed" into battery....the bullet head can seat itself slightly deeper into its casing. This can cause extremely dangerous increases in head pressures and can cause a KB!
Shooters that load and unload ammo from their semi-auto's routinely should be aware of this danger and I am sure most of the members here are aware of this recommendation.

Treat you weapon with as much care as you can......and it will remain something you can bet your life on.....after all that's why I carry mine.

I don't mean to step on anybody's toes and if I do accidentially, I hope I don't mess up their shoe polish.

JF
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
[b said:
Quote[/b] (sniper350 @ May 09 2005,2:18)]Back to the Semi-Auto......I suggested the use of Snap caps for your testing ( Tabor) because using "live" rounds can actually leave them "altered" No semi-auto rds should be cycled more then "twice" and if they are--- should be discarded ! This is advice from the ammo Manufacturers. What can happen is when the bullet is "slammed" into battery....the bullet head can seat itself slightly deeper into its casing. This can cause extremely dangerous increases in head pressures and can cause a KB!
Shooters that load and unload ammo from their semi-auto's routinely should be aware of this danger and I am sure most of the members here are aware of this recommendation.
I am aware of the dangers of chambering a round too many times (although I had never heard it boiled down to a number before). However, I thought that snap caps might have much less inertia and as such affect my test negatively. So, I now have 15 rounds that I need to dispose of, but I don't really mind. I guess this leads to one more question: How do you safely dispose of live ammunition?
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] (tabor @ May 08 2005,10:36)]I know how this safety works, but it is deactivated when the trigger is all the way to the rear right? So I was worried that if I pull the trigger when I am firing the gun, and the slide closes while I still have the trigger back, and the striker does not stay back, I may have a possibility for a slam fire.
Tabor,

I guess anything is possible, but from what you've described in your problem, I would think the gun just wouldn't go off at all. Meaning the striker would just run back down with the slide and not strike the primer.

Take it out to the range, keep it pointed in a safe direction and shoot the heck out of it. If you notice a problem, I'd get it fixed. Who knows, maybe you have one of those experimental full auto P99's
 

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Sniper350,

No toes being stepped on here. Just good discussion.

I'm in total agreement with your revolver statements, however, I don't think the difference in speed from the slide picking up a round, slows it down that much to make any bit of difference. If anything the main component taking up most of the stress from being slammed is that little slide stop. From what I can see the slide and the barrels chamber face are already mated up before the underside of the barrel even hits the slide stop. Thus it, the slide stop, is taking the brunt of the load.
 

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Tabor,
On the snap caps......there are brands available that are made to closely approximate a "real" bullet, weight and all.
They are used in training exercises. Mine are made of metal and are Black. They might be a little more difficult to find then the standard plastic caps.

If you shoot at a Range.........that's where I dispose of all the bullets that look questionable, that I have. I just place them in the metal can next to the shooting stall. But you do bring up a good point about safe disposal.......maybe someone has some other ideas about where you can get rid of them safely.

P88 gave you some good advice about shooting the heck out of your Walther to see if it misbehaves. 500 rds is the minimum "break-in" that I shoot before I start trusting the weapon. The first 10 rds would be shot with only two rds loaded in a magazine at one time.
I always test fire a new Handgun ( semi-auto) in this way. In early testing you will demonstrate the gun can "lock back" as it should. You never know what you get from the factory nowadays. This way you can keep control and if the gun does KB, you are not standing there with a completely loaded magazine.
The key is to test the gun in stages......with rapid firing the last thing you would want to do. Good luck and have fun

JF
 

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Any gun I fire for the first time I load with only 1 round. When I let someone else fire my gun for the first time they get only 1 round. That's how we did it during pistol orientation class and it seemed like a good idea. Did the same thing with my M38 although there is no danger of full auto of course. Seems like a safe habit that doesn't cost anything.

Oh yeah, I have machined aluminum snap caps. Expensive little buggers but worth it for all kinds of drills. I just wish they would be colored a little brighter so they're easier to find after I do jam-rack-click drills and the like.
 

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The striker is the pin that hits the primer.

The slide stop is the pin on the frame that keeps the barrel and slide onto the frame.
 
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