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Discussion Starter #1
This afternoon at a LGS I'm perusing the showcases and I spot what I thought was a pre war Walther Olympia for $399. I quickly got a store employee to retrieve it for me. The pistol at first glance appeared to be very good quality but I couldn't find the Walther or hammerli name on it, just "IT". Turns out to be sacrilege a Chinese copy of an Olympia, I was even more shocked at the build quality which was surprisingly good.
Any forum members ecev here of or see a Chinese copy of a Walther Olympia?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I just did some research and found out what it was, thanks for posting the photo. Have you had any issues with it?
 

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I just did some research and found out what it was, thanks for posting the photo. Have you had any issues with it?
No issues at all. I only shoot standard velocity cartridges in it although it may be fine with hi-speed. The design was as a target pistol in the 1930's so my reasoning is that it was regulated for standard velocity. It came with two magazines.
 

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My range buddy has one. Nothing wrong with it at all, a fine shooter indeed. His has the front weight to really hold the muzzle down when firing. When I was in the USMC, our armorers at the Precision Weapons Unit (forgive me if I don't have the name exactly right; it's been 30 years! ) would rebuild our 1911s from either Colt or Norinco Frames.. I was told and believe, that Norincos were largely forged from railroad rails.
 

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My range buddy has one. Nothing wrong with it at all, a fine shooter indeed. His has the front weight to really hold the muzzle down when firing. When I was in the USMC, our armorers at the Precision Weapons Unit (forgive me if I don't have the name exactly right; it's been 30 years! ) would rebuild our 1911s from either Colt or Norinco Frames.. I was told and believe, that Norincos were largely forged from railroad rails.
At one time I was good friends with Ed Banks, one of the very best 1911 pistol smiths in the country. He once told me that he was surprised by the Norinco 1911A1 pistols then being imported. He thought they were excellent quality. The slides had to be annealed to be cut for new sights. Otherwise the cutter just chattered against the steel. I never owned one but sometimes wish I had.
 
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