Walther Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Picked this up at the local gun shop. Got it for $220 OTD. Cleaned up pretty good in my estimation. Now to find a magazine for it.


 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,590 Posts
Mags can be found at Earl's repair shop..... commonly reffered to as Earl's
http://www.carlwalther.com/page2.htm
you may also want to check on gunbroker and places alike
I have to say for $220 you did great... I think you almost stole that thing :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The other side.......

The other side. No, the dealer is the one who stole it. He made a profit on it when he sold it to me.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Mags can be found at Earl's repair shop..... commonly reffered to as Earl's
http://www.carlwalther.com/page2.htm
you may also want to check on gunbroker and places alike
I have to say for $220 you did great... I think you almost stole that thing :)

Thanks for the info. Found magazines also at Champion's Choice http://www.champchoice.com/ . Their price's are a bit better than Earl's.

Have also decided I like the SN: XX911.

AJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Got The New Mag....but.....

Received the new magazine today from Champion's Choice(very fast service). There was a minor problem however. The mag would not fit my GSP. There is a ridge on the GSP/Expert magazines that is not on the GSP's (mine is of 1971 vintage). As I saw it I had three options: 1. Send it back; 2. Modify the mag; 3. Modify the frame. I chose Option 3. Here is why: By modifying the frame I can now use both types of magazines. With a half round file and slow filing followed by fitting the mag in the well and after about 10 minutes I had success. The mag now fits fine and feeds excellantly. Part of what drove my decision was the old style mags will be hard to come by and that I may run across either type at local gun shows. Also if I modified the mag, I would have to keep modifing mags as I obtained them. I was/am a maintenance type so making things fit/work comes as second nature to me. Some people will think I am nuts, but for about $300 I have a fully functional Walther GSP.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
a gsp 22

as you said, that is a vintage gsp, a very accurate firearm, which got many medals in its time.

I would have opted for sesrching for the propper magazine, to keep it as original as possible,but thinking again, those pistols were almst nevr kept as they cam out of the factory. Match shooters used to modify anything they don't like in their guns, and in the end each one of them ended up with "his" gun.

Function, not looks, is what drives competitive shooters all over the world.

Maybe you don't know or maybe even you are not interested, but in my time in international shooting, GSP ruled the arena of Rimfire and Centerfire pistol, except for the ladies sport pistol, where some women disliked their nose-heavy feeling and went for the older Hammerly 208.

And in the olympic Rapid fire match, the only gun you could see for yeasrs was the famed Walther OSP. Again, almost everyone was extensively modified.

I still keep both my GSP's 22 and 32, along with my OSP, some medals and a national shooting team jacket dry cleaned (that's the one I'll wear in my coffin and don't like to look raggy)

Congratulations and enjoy, shooting a GSP for fun is like driving a F1 car for groceries. ;-)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
as you said, that is a vintage gsp, a very accurate firearm, which got many medals in its time.

I would have opted for sesrching for the propper magazine, to keep it as original as possible,but thinking again, those pistols were almst nevr kept as they cam out of the factory. Match shooters used to modify anything they don't like in their guns, and in the end each one of them ended up with "his" gun.

Function, not looks, is what drives competitive shooters all over the world.

Maybe you don't know or maybe even you are not interested, but in my time in international shooting, GSP ruled the arena of Rimfire and Centerfire pistol, except for the ladies sport pistol, where some women disliked their nose-heavy feeling and went for the older Hammerly 208.

And in the olympic Rapid fire match, the only gun you could see for yeasrs was the famed Walther OSP. Again, almost everyone was extensively modified.

I still keep both my GSP's 22 and 32, along with my OSP, some medals and a national shooting team jacket dry cleaned (that's the one I'll wear in my coffin and don't like to look raggy)

Congratulations and enjoy, shooting a GSP for fun is like driving a F1 car for groceries. ;-)

The GSP is much more accurate than I am these days. It has been quite a while since I had to shoot for score.

I had thought about sending the magazine back to the dealer and continuing to look for an early GSP mag. However, as I thought about it I figured that if I modified the GSP to accept the newer magazines it may be beneficial to me in the long run. I can now use both types of magazines. Now next week at the local gun show I will stumble across a dozen old style mags for $5.00 dollars a piece(don't think so though).

I was aware of the history of the model when I saw it on the shelf in the back work room of the gun shop. I figured even in the condition of it (rusty, dirty and missing the mag), that they shop would be asking large dollars for it. So, when the dealer said $200, I just about dislocated my arm getting out my wallet.

Have cleaned it up and touched up the bluing. It is a much nicer looking piece now. Ran a 150 rounds through it yesterday at the range. The GSP easily out shot my Ruger 22/45 bull barrel. Think I'll keep it.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top