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Hi,

I just came across this as I was looking through my father-in-law's possessions.

I did some research and found the page giving the information on the serial numbers, but I'm not sure how to decipher it. It seems there is no 'P' in the serial number or anywhere else, that I see. This serial number is six numbers, beginning with 844xxx.

The magazine I has the Walther stamp, but no serial number. I don't know if the holster is the original, it looks pretty beat up but I do not see a stamp anywhere on it. I was just wondering if anybody could give me more of an idea on the year of manufacturing, as I'm a bit confused on serial number reference.

I've attached a few pictures. I can take more if there's another angle or specific photo that would help.

Thank you for your time.
 

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It has the early 90 degree safety. Walther switched to the 60 degree saftey in 35/36. Probably an early commercial version.
 

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That is the sort of prewar PPK that presents tough choices. The finish is half-removed, probably by blood or some other spillage, and there's some ragged light pitting, so it looks like hell and there isn't much left to preserve. But 1930s Walthers display impeccable quality and workmanship of the highest order; from a functional viewpoint they just don't come any better.

I would say the decisive factor will be bore condition. IF it's very fine, AND IF the rest of the gun functions perfectly, it would be a good candidate for high-grade restoration of the kind that Trumbull and a few --not many-- others can do, and it's expensive. Preserving markings, proof-stamps and sharp edges requires a lot of skilled hand work. By the time you're done, you'll have as much or more money in it as it will be worth, but it will be a outstanding gun.

If you're unwilling to embark on that expenditure, either leave it alone and squint while looking at it, or glass-bead and hard-chrome it and enjoy it for its industrial excellence.

M
 

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Thank you for the responses.

In my searching, my guess was that it was an earlier 30s model. However that was a 100% guess from probably misguided research. But it seems to be close to that.

I look forward to spending a bit of time with it, and possibly taking it to a local gun shop to let somebody knowledgeable get a Hands-On look at it.

Thank you for the insight.

Mike
 

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Thank you for the responses.

In my searching, my guess was that it was an earlier 30s model. However that was a 100% guess from probably misguided research. But it seems to be close to that.

I look forward to spending a bit of time with it, and possibly taking it to a local gun shop to let somebody knowledgeable get a Hands-On look at it.

Thank you for the insight.

Mike

Well, it appears you have one of those produced just after the end of the RZM contract in 1935. But although I can really make out the details of the magazine, it appears it is a post war magazine. Perhaps the grips were replaced too? Is the grip one piece or is there a seem down the rear of the grip? I would give it a good cleaning and keep it. Don't want to appear snotty, but I don't think you will find somebody as knowledgable at your LGS as you will find on these pages. Just my opinion. Some decent photo without flash that produce shadows would help evaluation from members here. Use natural light and decent close-ups.
 

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Well, it appears you have one of those produced just after the end of the RZM contract in 1935. But although I can really make out the details of the magazine, it appears it is a post war magazine. Perhaps the grips were replaced too? Is the grip one piece or is there a seem down the rear of the grip? I would give it a good cleaning and keep it. Don't want to appear snotty, but I don't think you will find somebody as knowledgable at your LGS as you will find on these pages. Just my opinion. Some decent photo without flash that produce shadows would help evaluation from members here. Use natural light and decent close-ups.

Thank you for the insight.

I will bring it to work tomorrow and take some photos with better light, hopefully showing more detail and more distinctive features.

Thank you again.

Mike
 

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Well, it appears you have one of those produced just after the end of the RZM contract in 1935. But although I can really make out the details of the magazine, it appears it is a post war magazine. Perhaps the grips were replaced too? Is the grip one piece or is there a seem down the rear of the grip? I would give it a good cleaning and keep it. Don't want to appear snotty, but I don't think you will find somebody as knowledgable at your LGS as you will find on these pages. Just my opinion. Some decent photo without flash that produce shadows would help evaluation from members here. Use natural light and decent close-ups.
Here are a few new photos. Hopefully they give a bit more insight. I tried to leave the files large as to make zooming in possible. hopefully the files aren't too big to post.

Also, I looked closer at the grip and it seems to be one piece, however the design with the knurl down the center makes it look like either side is separate, but I did not notice that it indeed was. I unscrewed the small flat-head machine screw that goes through the grip, however it did not seem to open or 'release' anything. I didn't want to pry or break anything, so I just put the screw back in. BTW, not sure if you can tell from the photo's, but it appears that the grip does not sit completely flush at the proximal end of the grip, where it attaches to the frame.

If you know how the grip is attached and/or removed, I can do that with some guidance. I just didn't want to start prying if the grip has to be removed in a certain fashion as to ensure it doesn't crack/break.

Are there any other photos/angles that would help show the details that would be needed to get more accurate information? Please let me know and I can take whatever photos might be more helpful.

Thanks again for your time,

Mike.
 

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That is an original one-piece grip, and most likely original to that gun. It shows the signs of warpage and shrinkage very common to such grips, as well as incipient stress cracks resulting from it. The grip is valuable, so removing it calls for extreme care because the plastic may be brittle and easily broken. It comes off to the rear and downward, but I don't have one to closely examine (shine a light inside the mag well to identify the abutting surfaces) so I will leave to others more familiar with the procedure to describe how to correctly accomplish this.

If you want to shoot the gun (if it's functionally okay, I would happily do so) buy some modern 2-piece wood or plastic grips to install and put the originals away somewhere with controlled humidity so they don't dry out.

M
 

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Hi,

I just came across this as I was looking through my father-in-law's possessions................................................I was just wondering if anybody could give me more of an idea on the year of manufacturing, as I'm a bit confused on serial number reference..................

Thank you for your time.

To your last unanswered question. The PP/PPK series numbering began in with 750,000 and continued towards 1000000 with some confusion at the end, until the Walther factory began using suffix letters with the firearms serial numbers to identify the type of weapon. Thereafter, PPKs received a K suffix and the PPs a P suffix with each serial number.

I think that answers all your questions. As advised earlier, don't mess with the finish. Take care of the grips. Don't store it in the vinyl (?) holster.
 
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