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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know of a "course" that covers advanced tuning/maintenance on Walther pistols? I'd be happy to buy something specific to Walther (PPQ, P99, etc) Even gunsmithing course specific to Walther. I want to do as much "fine tuning" as is reasonable without a mill or lathe.
There are a few things scattered around youtube (???) and there are full fledged gunsmith courses. Gunsmithing mostly are for glock.

Appreciate any leads or tips.

Thanks,
Regis
 

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I have a copy of the Walther P99 Armorer's Manual if that would be any help. you can PM me and I'll email you a PDF...
 

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I want to do as much "fine tuning" as is reasonable without a mill or lathe.
What type of "fine tuning" are you talking about? With a few exceptions, most of the tuning was done before the parts left the factory so that they would just drop in, and work.
 

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RegisG, most P99/PPQ's work just fine, right out of the box....really nothing to tweak or fine tune. However, ocassionally, someone will wind up with a gun that has a somewhat gritty trigger, and that can usually be fixed in about 5 minutes with a little piece of 400 grit sand paper and some lube.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
All,
Thanks for comments and pdf offer.

Now if I knew the "tuning" possibilities, I probably would not be looking for course or manual. But, I like to tinker even when there is very little to do or at lease thoroughly inspect. Helps me to know my gun even better.

Regis
 

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Helps me to know my gun even better.
I personally feel it is best to start from the opposite end, and to know your gun better, before tinkering.

Inspect the pistol and if there are any parts that you don't understand the function of, feel free to ask away. There are plenty of helpful members on this forum who may be able to help you. If the parts have anything to do with the function of the safety mechanisms in the pistol, I'd suggest you leave them alone, completely.

Before tuning or tinkering with any parts of the pistol, I'd suggest asking here whether or not it is a good idea first. If there is something specific about the pistol that you feel you want to mess around with, you may as well use this forum as a resource. There may be some good reasons why you should or should not mess with any number of parts on this pistol.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I personally feel it is best to start from the opposite end, and to know your gun better, before tinkering.

Inspect the pistol and if there are any parts that you don't understand the function of, feel free to ask away. There are plenty of helpful members on this forum who may be able to help you. If the parts have anything to do with the function of the safety mechanisms in the pistol, I'd suggest you leave them alone, completely.

Before tuning or tinkering with any parts of the pistol, I'd suggest asking here whether or not it is a good idea first. If there is something specific about the pistol that you feel you want to mess around with, you may as well use this forum as a resource. There may be some good reasons why you should or should not mess with any number of parts on this pistol.
I agree with all you've said. And, for particular questions, I would not hesitate to ask here. But, coming from mostly the benchrest world and over 65 years shooting, I like polishing and tinkering. I am relatively new to Walthers and they just feel good in hand, I want to learn more.

Thanks,
Regis
 

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Primarily only a couple of things sometimes need a little attention.

Trigger bar guide, part 32.8. The bottom of the half circle (within the red circle) rubs/guides the trigger bar as the trigger is moved from front to back, or back and forth.


The trigger bar guide rubs on the trigger bar at/within area in the blue circle. Its THIS area that can result in a gritty feel in the trigger if its not smooth, OR if its not lubed.


The area indicated in the blue circle can be smoothed using a tiny piece of 400 grit sand paper, without removing ANYTHING from the pistol.....just a simple field strip.

Make sure that area within the blue circle is smooth, and if not spend a minute or two with a tiny piece of sand paper stuffed between the trigger bar and the trigger bar guide, while working the trigger back and forth about 50 times. Blow er out, lube it and go shoot it.

The only other area that can sometimes benefit from a minute or so of hand sanding/polishing is the contact patches between the trigger bar and the firing pin safety/block.

That's really about it.....for the most part, there's just not anything else that needs to be tweaked or jiked with.
 

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I sent along the P99 Armorer's Manual. It never hurts to understand how things go together...:)
 
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I personally feel it is best to start from the opposite end, and to know your gun better, before tinkering.

Inspect the pistol and if there are any parts that you don't understand the function of, feel free to ask away. There are plenty of helpful members on this forum who may be able to help you. If the parts have anything to do with the function of the safety mechanisms in the pistol, I'd suggest you leave them alone, completely.

Before tuning or tinkering with any parts of the pistol, I'd suggest asking here whether or not it is a good idea first. If there is something specific about the pistol that you feel you want to mess around with, you may as well use this forum as a resource. There may be some good reasons why you should or should not mess with any number of parts on this pistol.
AMEN.

Any part of a pistol that needs tuning will, in my experience, manifest that need after a few hundred rounds at the range. Otherwise, don't molest it.

The vague urge to "improve" a gun that is already working well is the major impetus driving the purchase of parts to replace those ruined.

M
 

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If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Else it may well soon be broke and then beyond your abilities. Really, these guns need little in the way of "fine tuning", :rolleyes:

Mine literally sits around, bounces around in my SUV, and gets lint and dries out, and has never gave any problems. And it has a broken trigger bar. Still fires. Hell with it, lol. I DO need to call Fort Smith in regards to the trigger bar, though, and ASAP, but I keep forgetting.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
American Gunsmith Institute offers a pretty good video.
Just got off phone with them and the only Walther they have is armorer manual for PPK.

No Walther videos or anything on PPQ, P99, etc


Thanks, was worth checking

Regis
 
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