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Discussion Starter #1
Good day,

As per another thread, I recently picked up a PPK/S in 7.65 from 1969. The double action trigger pull is so heavy, at first it seems like it has a safety on.

Is this normal for these .32 caliber pistols?

Thanks
 

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Try the PPK/S in .22 - the DA pull clocks in at 17.5 lbs.
Always curious as to the reason for that.
 

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The .22 may have a stouter mainspring due to .22 ignition.
For the OP, make sure the internals are clean and lubed. Not sure what your frame of reference may be, but my Rangers don't seem all that awful.
Moon
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The .22 may have a stouter mainspring due to .22 ignition.
For the OP, make sure the internals are clean and lubed. Not sure what your frame of reference may be, but my Rangers don't seem all that awful.
Moon
Moon, I'm directly comparing it to a current production PPK/S in .380 - the DA on the .380 is quite a bit lighter. I'm serious when I say that the .32 actually feels like it has a safety on until I pull harder until the hammer finally starts to pull back. It's the heaviest trigger I've ever felt. Most of my SA/DA experience has been Sig P226's and P229's.
 

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The price of DA capability in Walther PP-series pistols is complexity and the need for very precise manufacture, fitting and quality control, all of which can be a lot looser in SA-only pistols.

Several variables affect the weight of DA pull in individual pistols:

The first and most obvious is the strength of the hammer spring, which --since you just acquired this gun-- you have no way of knowing if it's the original. A previous owner may have blindly followed internet wisdom and replaced all the springs because "it couldn't hurt" and because "they were old."

The second is friction between all the parts which must move during DA operation. The force needed to move them may be greater or lesser depending on how they are fitted, polished and lubricated. This also includes a few fixed parts such as the hammer axle and the sear rivets.

The third is the precise fit between the hammer strut (i.e., the hammer spring guide) and the hammer, which governs the rebound function and the "at rest" position of the hammer when DA force is applied. If the relationship between the parts is incorrect, or if axle holes are not accurately drilled in the frame, the geometry will be disturbed and excessive force will be required to overcome it. This is the most difficult problem to diagnose and correct.

In most cases a very hard DA pull can be reduced, or at least made smoother but it takes an experienced gunsmith with a good selection of spare parts to diagnose and fix it. In other cases improvement is more trouble than it's worth; just cock the hammer with your thumb and be done with it.

M
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks MGMIke. If I wanted to have someone look at this pistol, can you recommend a really good smith who knows these guns?
 
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