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Discussion Starter #1
Good day everyone. A few days ago, I did an intro in the new members section. I am the new owner of a very early 9mm Kurz/380APC, PPK/S with first year,1968 proof marks and an early 1969 production date. The firearm was likely sold new on a Military base in February of 1969 and as far as I can tell, sitting in its box in storage its entire life, un-fired other than the test rounds.

The S/N is 136058S and as far as I can tell, it would have been made some time in January of 1969. I bought after searching far and wide as it as it meets C&R rules which makes it legal in California. It was complete with the original "alligator" box, manual, test-target, loaded round indicator tool, brass cleaning rod and both magazines. The spare magazine was still wrapped and filled with grease and from my inspection.

The bluing is 100% perfect and there is not a nick or scratch anywhere on it. The barrel and feed ramp are mirror shiny and after taking the grips off, I could find just a light amount of oil and not dirt or grime anywhere.

The original box is marked PP and PPK but the "S" is not printed in but hand written in. I assume Walther had not had new labels made up and was using up older boxes and just hand writing in the "S" for a short period of time.

After it gets out of California Gun jail, I will add it to my CCW license and use it as a back up carry piece.

I am fairly excited. I had a much later production InterArms PPK about 15 years ago but foolishly sold it and they are no longer legal in California.

I am attaching some photos for those who care about the early production PPK/S models. Chime in if anyone else has an early one like this one.

Cheers,

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Earlier today, I was able to get in training testing session with my CCW instructor to add this PPK/S to my California CCW license.

Its been at least 15 years since I last fired and regrettably sold my first PPK. It was like meeting and old friend all over again.

The instructor had about 20 students going for their initial CCWs and he stopped the class to show them what a real gun looks like. Everyone there had some sort of polymer modern Glock variation or a S&W MP9 Shield, which is also my regular carry gun with a red-dot sight.

The instructor was shocked, he had not seen a real California legal PPK/S in many years since they were banned.

I qualified easily and then put a total of 200 rounds through the gun using Fiocchi FMJ target rounds. Not a single jam or hang up of any kind.

The gun was just magnificent and even at 30 feet, I was getting ten for ten in the red with easy consistency. I will attach photos of a coupe of the targets I shot. I can get a bit more accuracy with the red-dot on my MP9 Shield, but the PPK is far more fun and rewarding with iron sights.

I am most certainly going to be using this as a back-up CCW weapon and can easily see using it as a primary carry when I am in nice clothes or when I have to wear a suit or blazer.

Cheers and a Happy Thanksgiving to all,

Bill
 

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Very early 50 year old 1969 Manurhin PPK/S fresh out of the box
Although Manurhin was involved in the production of this pistol, we should speak of a Walther PPK/S. When we talk about a Manurhin PPK/S, we imagine a gun with Manurhin's own legend on it.

I am the new owner of a very early 9mm Kurz/380APC, PPK/S with first year,1968 proof marks and an early 1969 production date.
The exact German calibre designation is "9mm short". The lower case "k" is correct. (A completely different case would be "9mm Parabellum". There it needs the upper case.) As a matter of fact, Pistols manufactured by Manurhin for the American market carry the calibre designation with the wrong capital "K" sometimes.

By the way, you mean a 1969 proof mark, don't you?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Good evening everyone, there was a small note in the box. Form memory it said Father bought this in February of 1969 and it was delivered at the PX. Post Exchange? At least that is what I assumed.

Also, I did not mean to imply that the proof marks could have possibly been added before this PPK/S was assembled, only that they were the new type that was first used in 1968 or so according to Dieter H. Marschall's Walther Pistols Model 1 to PPX as shown on page 255. The barrel also has the Ulm Antler proof mark as well.

Cheers,

Bill
 

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Seriously if it were my gun I would keep it in mint condition by not ever carrying it as its value is not only great right now it continues to sky rocket of kept in pristine condition.

Lets face facts the modern guns made of cheap plastic often cost less and are lighter in weight and a high quality plastic gun is usually very reliable. There is no good reason to destroy a mint Walther by carrying it. Some modern plastic 9mm guns are actually lighter in weight and close to the same size for concealability. If you like the .380 caliber there are some very small modern made .380's out there and they crank them out every day. If the cops take it off of you, if it gets stolen out of your car, if you accidentally blow it up it its no big deal because they crank them out every day.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I very much respect everyones' opinions on keeping it pristine, which I intend to do, but here in KommiePhornia just having a legal PPK/S is near impossible. We can only own the few that qualify under C&R rules and that means only those with ultra-low serial numbers. The only other way to get one is for a LEO to sell you his personal possession which few will ever do.

For me, I need to wear a suit and sport coat often for work and my S&W MP9 Shield, while small is just a bit too bulky. The PPK/S on the other hand fits like a glove and I can keep a spare magazine or two in a shirt pocket or back pants pocket.

This one finally got out of Kalifornia gun jail earlier today and our Sheriff's Department added it without delay to my CCW license.

I was very surprised to find that it came with not one but two original "Alligator" boxes, both with the serial number of the gun? Must be a story there for sure... why would one gun have two boxes???

For those that were not happy with the finger prints on it, they have been wiped down and the gun correctly cleaned. Other than the rounds I put through it for my CCW add on and those fired when it was new 50+ years ago, I do not think it has ever been shot. New photos to follow when I can.

Cheers,

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hi Pedro,

It allows you to remove the round chambered indicator pin during full disassembly.

That tool and similar variations have been part of the PP/PPK/PPK/S kits going back many years. A more experienced owner can probably tell you the different variations and when and where the were introduced.

Cheers,

Bill
 

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Thank you for explaining that. I have purchased all second hand Walthers and i haven't received one, yet i don't think i have a chamber indicator on mine. ill have to look.

Also i have recently purchased a PPK/s with serial 1904XX. Im not sure how early this is, but the barrel seems to be stamped 74 from the pictures i have seen.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Hi Pedro,

The "74" stamping on your barrel is the year proof stamp from West Germany and that would have been added during final inspection after assembly and your serial number would be spot on for a weapon built in 1974 as well. There should also be a small antler stamp near the number as well.

I am not sure at which point in production but sometime in the 1970s, Walther switched to a plastic box instead of the cardboard type. My guess is that is when they no longer provided the small tool.

As I understand it, only the .32 and .380 versions have a loaded round indicator button. The .22 versions do not have this.

More knowledgeable folks on this site can probably chime in with additional details, facts and corrections if I am mistaken.

Cheers,

Bill
 

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Awesome, Thank you for confirming that.

This was purchased at auction here in Australia. It has a little bit of surface rust, but it comes with a presentation style box. I was more interested in the box, but i also do not have a PPK/s so it is a nice addition to the collection.

I have a Manurhin PPK, so next i may have to get a Walther labeled PPK.

My collection will slowly grow.
 

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.....here in KommiePhornia just having a legal PPK/S is near impossible. We can only own the few that qualify under C&R rules and that means only those with ultra-low serial numbers.
I assume you mean the default 50-year C&R qualification. The published C&R list is a semi-disorganized mess that needs to be cleaned up by BATF. However, if you look under “Walther” you will see that Manurhin roll-marked PP and PPK are all C&R eligible, regardless of age. It doesn’t list the /S, so maybe you are out of luck there (although you already have your /S). Anyway, you might check out the Manurhin pistols, they are every bit as good as the Walther-marked pistols. Manurhin PP are abundant and sell at a discount to Walther PP, but Manurhin PPK command a significant premium over the Walther PPK.
 

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Never bothered to investigate this, but my guess is it boils down to relative scarcity of the Manurhin PPK. You can buy a 1930s commercial Walther PPK for about half that of a Post-war Manurhin PPK. An even less expensive option that is not C&R eligible is a US-made Ranger/Interarms PPK. Dunno about the California eligibility aspect of those, but they are well-made pistols.
 
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