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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
To diagnose any feed stoppage in a Walther PP, PPK or PPK/s (or for that matter, any other semi-auto) pistol, FIRST try the following, one remedy at a time, in this order:

1) Try other ammunition. Use standard U.S.-made FMJ of known quality and performance.
2) Scrub out the chamber with a bronze brush until it's squeaky clean when inspected in sunlight.
3) Disassemble, inspect and clean the magazine. You must take it apart to clean it properly. If it's an aftermarket mag, don't bother; find an original.
4) Clean the extractor and see that it moves freely.

Then, and only then, if the problem persists, look elsewhere. New springs are way down on the list, and copious oiling seldom cures anything.

If you want to learn something from the experience, try only one remedy at a time. Otherwise you won't know which one was the cure.

M
 

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Some PPKs also had issues with the chamber loaded indicator being the culprit.... Also, they seem to require a LOT of rounds through them before they're broken in as mine was.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
My original post was not intended to be an exhaustive list of everything that MIGHT be wrong. Rather it is a sort of "immediate action" checklist of the simple, easy and cheap things one should try FIRST, before going off on a wild goose chase of diagnostic speculation buying new parts, changing springs, dremeling feed ramps, changing lubricants, fluffing & buffing, and hundreds of rounds of "breaking-in".

M
 

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worked for me...thank you

The list works...It did for me at least...New ppk/s, feed jams with Finucci(?) fmj at least 1 in five rounds...Usually first round..Got through 250+/- thinking maybe a breaking period...Nope..Purchased Federal(50 FMJ), Rem(same), 100 Wichester white box expecting pretty much the same...All worker Super and now I Love this gun...I was almost going to give up on it. Both clips with 3, 5 and 7 worked like a charm. Did 2 rapid fire 7 round clips nd what a gun...It shoots where you aim it. I cannot wait to see what it is like with a laser sight. Some say 380 is too mall for self defense..Only if you cannot shoot straight..This baby does. Expensive. Sure. But now it was worth every penny. Consider me one happy PPK owner..
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Points 1, 2 and 4 are equally applicable as "immediate action remedies" for chronic failures to EJECT in which the fired case stovepipes in the ejection port or is jammed above the top cartridge in the magazine.

Points 2 and 4 are the first things to try when one experiences failures to EXTRACT in which the case is found wholly or partly still in the chamber. Bear in mind, however, that in some cases it is really a failure to eject rather than to extract: the slide doesn't recoil far enough for the extracted case to strike the ejector, and the empty is simply rechambered. In that case, Point No. 1 also applies.

M
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
A good diagnostic technique for Point #2 --to ensure the chamber is clean, bright, and not glazed with a film of varnish-like schmutz, is to remove the slide and hold the pistol vertical with the muzzle down. A cartridge should drop smartly all the way into the chamber, and should fall out by gravity alone when the pistol is inverted. If it doesn't, either you haven't scrubbed the chamber well enough or the ammo is not correctly dimensioned. (It would be very rare to find the chamber undersized).

This technique must be tried with samples of each of the brands or types of ammo that you intend to use. Cartridge cases are not created equal; some will be larger or longer than others, or have other dimensional anomalies. And bullets are all over the place in size, weight and contour. Test them all.

Examine the chamber walls in bright sunlight; they should be white, not yellow or brown. Scrub the chamber by twirling a bronze brush in a rotary motion that will get into the sharp corner at the front of the chamber.

Copious oiling and/or fastidious lubrication rarely has any significant effect on a clean gun that is chronically malfunctioning; look for some other cause.

And supposedly "weak" recoil springs, in my judgment, are almost never the cause of failures to feed.

M
 

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"Weak" recoil springs are prone to be better, another way of saying they are "broken in". In fact, I prefer "lighter" recoil springs such as made by Wolff. (16, 17, 18 lbs : For USA made Interarms PPK/S .380). This allows a wider range of ammo brands for reliable feeding. The stock 20 lbs spring is what makes the gun "picky" about ammo.

What I've explained here is for actual defensive use with premium (hotter) ammo for hollow point expansion. This does batter the gun and has higher recoil, but it is RELIABLE in my experience. When I go to the range for recreational plinking, then I'll use whatever ammo is abundant or available and with the stock 20 lbs recoil spring. Any jamming to occur is welcomed (and anticipated) as a chance to practice my response to the situation.
 

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I swapped out 17 lb for the stock 20 lb because my 380 Interarms was difficult to
rack. Now it cycles perfectly.
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The extent to which feed stoppages can result from dimensional differences between brands of ammunition is often underestimated. For example, a minor difference in the width of the extractor groove machined into a rimless cartridge case can result in interference with the inward seating of the extractor claw and produce misalignment causing a failure to feed.

Always the first step: try other ammo.

M
 

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Discussion Starter #15
An additional diagnostic technique to isolate a bad magazine: test functioning with only three or four cartridges loaded. (I mean actual firing, not snap-cap twiddling.) This test reduces the curvature of the cartridge column with .32ACP, .22 LR and 9mm Para, and minimizes friction drag on the magazine feed lips and on the slide. If it works fine with 3 but not with 8, the mag lips are probably okay, but the cartridge OAL is suspect.

M
 

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Great suggestions from the start, Thanks
I had nagging issues with failure to load and eject with my 32 cal PP and all the disassembly, cleaning and oiling was no help, But two new Mags cured everything. Now It will reliably work with Remington FMJ's and Winchester FMJ and JHP. I was thrilled to see it operate flawlessly for over 250 rounds now.
 

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I realize this is a necro-post, but, the tip about the magazines solves a LOT of issues.
Took me a while to learn it, but now it's usually the first thing I check.

First and foremost, place the Dremel on the ground and take two steps back.

Clean and lube the mag. Really clean, not wipe down. Test for function.
Clean and lube the gun. Really clean, not wipe down. Test for function.
Carefully inspect for worn or broken parts. Replace if necessary. Test for function.
Change ammo type. Test for function.
Look carefully at whether or not you yourself are limp wristing, riding the slide, putting pressure on the mag, etc.

After all this, you can look at springs, feed ramps, fluff and buff, planets in line, pod people, sasquatch, etc.
 
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