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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

New to the forum. I recently bought a PPK/S from Walther. Since I got it there was an issue where the trigger didn't always catch after a pull, so it would skip the hammer. This means that, if the hammer wasn't already pulled back, there would be no shot. I sent it back and Walther replaced all the mechanisms behind the grips. I've filmed the issue here

Trouble is, it came back from Walther and seemed fine but about 50 rounds later and it's doing it again. I've tried gently lubing all the joints and catches under the grips and below the hammer, but it doesn't seem to make much difference.

Has anyone else seen this?
 

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I don’t know the cause, but the specific terminology you need to use is ‘reset’, as in, your trigger isn’t doing it.

Try this: when it doesn’t reset, thumb-cock the hammer. Will it stay back, or will it follow your thumb forward when you release it? That could be another symptom you are experiencing, but just don’t know about yet.

In either case, you definitely still have the original reset problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don’t know the cause, but the specific terminology you need to use is ‘reset’, as in, your trigger isn’t doing it.

Try this: when it doesn’t reset, thumb-cock the hammer. Will it stay back, or will it follow your thumb forward when you release it? That could be another symptom you are experiencing, but just don’t know about yet.

In either case, you definitely still have the original reset problem.
So that reset, you can see when I push forward the trigger and it clicks. I can also pull the hammer back and the trigger still releases the hammer (just doesn't bring it back). Also, pulling the rack back 1mm "resets" the trigger too.
 

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So that reset, you can see when I push forward the trigger and it clicks. I can also pull the hammer back and the trigger still releases the hammer (just doesn't bring it back). Also, pulling the rack back 1mm "resets" the trigger too.

Take the grips off and see if it's still doing it. The grip may be impinging on the mechanism on the left side of the gun (under the safety lever)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Take the grips off and see if it's still doing it. The grip may be impinging on the mechanism on the left side of the gun (under the safety lever)
It is a lot less frequent (maybe not at all) when the slide is removed.
 

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My two cents from Germany:
I suppose you bought the pistol as new.
Then the following legal position applies in Germany:
You have 2 years warranty.
In these 2 years, the manufacturer has twice the opportunity to improve a mistake. If the mistake still persists then the buyer can either give the item back and get the purchase price back. Or he gets for free from the manufacturer a new, defect-free item.
Of course I don't know the legal situation for that in the USA. Nevertheless, I would send the gun again to Walther and ask if you can get already a new pistol as a replacement.
When such a serious mistake occurs twice, I believe that Walther doesn't want to lose its reputation as a manufacturer of reliable weapons.
 

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My two cents from Germany:
I suppose you bought the pistol as new.
Then the following legal position applies in Germany:
You have 2 years warranty.
In these 2 years, the manufacturer has twice the opportunity to improve a mistake. If the mistake still persists then the buyer can either give the item back and get the purchase price back. Or he gets for free from the manufacturer a new, defect-free item.
Of course I don't know the legal situation for that in the USA. Nevertheless, I would send the gun again to Walther and ask if you can get already a new pistol as a replacement.
When such a serious mistake occurs twice, I believe that Walther doesn't want to lose its reputation as a manufacturer of reliable weapons.
Lifetime warranty on all Walther pistol subject to the availability of parts. Fort Smith, Arkansas is the new distribution/manufacturing plant here. S&W is out of the loop and everything goes through Fort Smith. They pay for everything including shipping unless an owner has purposely damaged something. Now about that second mistake....might I point you to the CCP and P22 sections. A call to Ft Smith will likely get the pistol shipped back at the manufacturer's expense for another attempt at repair. Most of the time they get it right....if the problem isn't designed into the pistol to begin with. 1917
 

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So sad to see what Walther has become. I remember buying my first PPK/s in 1978 the last year of German/French production. I never had a problem with it. I recently bought one made back in 73. Again functions flawlessly. I will never buy any of the Walther ppk/s and ppk guns made in America. I have been following the production problems with them since they first start making them in the U.S. decades ago. Too many horror stories for me ever to get burned buying one of them.
 

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I don't have a Fort Smith, but my two Interarms/Ranger PPK pistols function perfectly. I also find any one of my Rangers to be equal my to Ulm/IA PPK. (However, my Ulm/IA PPK tends to sit in the safe.) I once owned a S&W PPK pistol, but foolishly let it go; because of its feed ramp (retained by Fort Smith) it was reliable with all types of ammo and therefore the most reliable PPK I'd ever owned.
 

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U.S. made Walthers

I agree with DE pistols. U.S. made Rangers had gone through numerous inspections prior to being sent to Interarms. Interarms then inspecting them and returned any they found lacking. These are well made pistols. The current trend seem to be calling them junk. I disagree.

One of the problems is that owners tried to make them something they were not. These pistols were made to fire FMJ bullets. If you stick with FMJ you have no problems (unless Bubba worked on them). With patience owners learned some better defensive bullets could be used. If you can find a Ranger that has not been "fixed" buy it. I have never had a problem with mine. They are good pistols.

Duncan
 

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I agree with DE pistols. U.S. made Rangers had gone through numerous inspections prior to being sent to Interarms. Interarms then inspecting them and returned any they found lacking. These are well made pistols. The current trend seem to be calling them junk. I disagree.

One of the problems is that owners tried to make them something they were not. These pistols were made to fire FMJ bullets. If you stick with FMJ you have no problems (unless Bubba worked on them). With patience owners learned some better defensive bullets could be used. If you can find a Ranger that has not been "fixed" buy it. I have never had a problem with mine. They are good pistols.

Duncan

I find your post rather astonishing and adding further proof of why I do not buy American made Walther's. How in the world can anyone call the Ranger pistol a good pistol when it fails to function with modern expanding ammo and when it rarely does only with certain brands. Lets be honest that makes the pistol a failure in modern times. Yes we could excuse some pistols made way back in the early 1900's for not working with expanding bullets because they were never engineered to work with them but some outstanding guns ancient guns did like the FN 1910 and the FN1922 with their almost straight in line feed. When previously made European Walthers worked with both fmj and expanding bullets no one should be making excuses for later made American made guns when they do not.

I might mention very early made U.S. Walthers in the U.S. made back in the 80's had their magazines fall out under recoil and were jam-a-matics too. The much later made Smith/Walthers had ignition problems in double action mode. Some of the Walther American made TPH guns in .22 l.r. had functioning problems as well but not the super rare German made guns that managed to find their way into the U.S. as police back up guns and were later sold to the public by private sale.
 

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"How in the world can anyone call the Ranger pistol a good pistol when it fails to function with modern expanding ammo and when it rarely does only with certain brands."
-- Response: Of the "PP series," only the Smith & Wesson and Fort Smith PPK/S & PPK pistols are designed for modern expanding ammo.

"I might mention very early made U.S. Walthers in the U.S. made back in the 80's had their magazines fall out under recoil and were jam-a-matics too."
-- Response: "Absolutes" like this are rarely based in fact. So while I can't speak for others, I've never had a mag drop from my Ranger PPK pistols and they function perfectly.

My reliability (R) math is: R = Pistol status + Magazine status + Ammo selection + Shooter technique/skill/knowledge.
 

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Rangers

And let's not forget the State of Kentucky issued Rangers to its State Police for a backup weapon. I don't think that they were issued to hold done papers. My Police Department issued Rangers for undercover officers. Back in the 1970s and 80s hollow point ammo
was in its infancy and no semiautomatic pistols handled it well, and none expanded reliably.

I'm out of this discussion as I do not like see Walther bashing, American made or other.

Duncan
 

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My Interarms/Ranger stainless TPH did the same thing, brand new from the factory. Probably got 30-50 DA pulls and it quit resetting in DA. Sent the pistol back, and they sent me a whole new pistol, which, so far has not repeated the problem (after 20+ years, although, it rarely gets shot).
 
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