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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
As some may remember I sent my Walther in, after reports and photos here from others, for my Trigger Pin moving much too easily. I, never having seen a pin so loose, presumed there must be a defect.

Just got returned today. I’ll give them credit - it was fast - however I am not entirely sure what was done or was I given the Walther equivalent of “take two aspirin and call me in the morning.” I guess it says it was “Adjusted.”
Well, glad to have my baby back. But I’ll be watching...assuming this is normal movement, as intended and designed, and will not fall out.
But a pleasant experience all around and quite pain free. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hope your right. If that was done it was not mentioned from the above.
But this is my first ever factory repair - I may not speak Walther! :)
 

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This isn't uncommon with gun repairs. Keep us posted.
Moon
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Okay a minor update.
Finally getting a chance to play with the PPK clean and lubing prior to being put back in service.
Something was definitely done to/with the pin but, unfortunately, I really have no idea of what at this time. Was going to really examine it but as I took no measurements prior I’m sure I won’t be able to tell anything by eye.

The pin is harder to start moving but by no means difficult. The major change (and I didn’t try to force it at this time) is the spring having a much tighter “pinch” or hold on the pin and not easily sliding all the way thru and out like before.

If someone smarter then me took before and after measurements I’d be curious.

EDIT: Now that I have it apart I see some carbon/powder residue. On the form I told Walther that the gun fired and functioned fine and that the only issue was the trigger pin but it looks like they test fired it anyway. Makes perfect sense I reckon.
 

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A slightly bigger pin is seemingly the most elegant solution, but unlikely available to Walther's service department unless this problem has already been identified, a remedy prescribed, and oversized pins supplied. However, the limiting factor is the size of the hole in the trigger...and that is a hardened part.

The next most elegant solution is to swage the edge of the hole in the frame to make its diameter smaller, enough to better grip the pin. Ideally this is done internally, on one side or the other of the orifice exiting in the trigger slot in the frame, so the peening doesn't show. That requires thinking ahead...

Another remedy is to peen or stake the tail end of the pin to deform it so it jams in the hole.

The pedestrian solution is Locktite, but unless it's artfully done, can wind up seizing everything.

Ah, choices, choices. Decisions, decisions.

Of course the best answer is rigid quality control, but...

M
 

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Discussion Starter #7
By happenstance I was in our local large chain outdoor store the next town over.
They have finally received a stainless PPK/S that they were selling for $699.
I asked to see it, with the intention of just pushing on the trigger pin, and found it did not move easily - in fact not at all - though it should be noted as it was tough to get at with the trigger guard the store puts on all guns (and will not remove) on display. Not sure how much thumbnail I really got on it.
 

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Yeah, ran into that trigger lock nonsense at Dunhams; somebody at corporate covering their derriere.
The retaining groove appears to be on the left side. It would have been helpful if they had put the groove on both sides, so that it wouldn't matter which way the pin was inserted, but that might have created issues with the spring catching the wrong end.
Moon
 
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