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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m not new to shooting, but I am new to carrying a 9 mm and a Walther. I was carrying a G42 and felt I wanted more stopping power and more rounds which is why I switched to my CCP M2. It has as about as much recoil as my G42 does. It eats just about anything I put through it, although the cheaper stuff tends to misfeed, and I’m learning how to clear jams. :rolleyes: My issue is the trigger...sure it’s not as smooth as my G42, however after watching a couple of YouTube videos I’m pretty I can fix that myself, the main issue is the texture of the trigger face, it bites my finger so to speak. Now, this could be the way I’m shooting (I’m learning to correct my low and to the left shots) or the recoil. But, has anyone taken a file to smooth theirs down a little? Is this something I can do, or should I take it to my gunsmith? Or, even better, is there an aftermarket trigger I can replace it with? Don’t get me wrong, I have the same exact trigger face on my 22/45, and I know it’s a .22 as opposed to a 9 mm, big difference...I know. But, this trigger is giving me headaches. Suggestions, ideas, thoughts?
 

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I've smoothed a few edges that I didn't like in the plastic trigger and trigger guard area using some of the finer grits from a pack of hobby sanding films (multi-color plastic backed sheets).
 

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I'd like to ask some questions in this thread, if I may -- specifically because not once (ever) have I been 'bitten' by a Glock-style trigger safety. Thus, I'm trying to understand how/why it happens.

Some questions:
  • Are those being bitten using an old DA-style trigger pull rather than adjusting their trigger pull to that which is appropriate to a modern, semi-automatic pistol? (See images, below, for reference...)
  • Are those being bitten pulling the trigger straight back using the centers of the pads of their trigger fingers rather than improperly pulling the trigger (e.g. using the tips of their trigger fingers; using the first joints of their trigger fingers; pulling at a slight angle rather than straight back; etc.)? (See images, below, for reference...)
  • Are those being bitten allowing sympathetic muscle movements in the primary and/or support hand to slightly rotate the pistol while firing that might contribute to an improper trigger pull?
  • Do those being bitten have large/meat/fat fingers?
  • Is there some combination of the above?


I'm asking because I'm trying to understand why (in decades of shooting) I've never been bitten by any blade style trigger safety on any firearm I've handled that had one … yet some people complain of bites. Understanding this better may allow me to help diagnose and correct such issues in those I teach should it be a mechanical issue on the part of the shooter, so I'm in need of some data.


Any/all insight is be appreciated. Please DO NOT take this post as an attempt to criticize or correct you (the reader); I seek data and understanding and need to ask direct questions as well as receive direct, honest answers in order to learn on this topic. Thanks!


Reference Images:



 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
After taking a magnifying glass to my trigger, there is a small ridge in the middle of the trigger. My husband thinks he can smooth that out with a file. But, Surrealone, your post is what I needed to see! Knowing exactly where my finger needs to make contact to make the correct shot just right. I know I have no trouble with my .22...maybe it’s the lack of recoil that helps me make a better shot, I just don’t know. I was taught long ago, to squeeze off your rounds, maybe that’s not right? I need more dry fire practice that’s for sure. Thank you for your input.
 

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While you're dryfiring/practicing, mount a laser on the rail...turn it on, take aim at the target/wall, squeeze the trigger until it clicks. WATCH the laser bounce. Now, learn to squeeze/pull the trigger with less laser bounce. Without the laser, you have NO idea how much the muzzle of the pistol moves when you break a shot.
 

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What old fart recommends is very good. And keep in mind if your not planning to use the laser with the gun you can go with a cheaper one because it not going to have to withstand the shock of the gun firing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well that was a waste of my money. It will not work well with the CCP, or the PPS. Something about the striker staying engaged against the back of the laser. I was really hoping this would help...all is not lost though. I do have a (yes, I’m going to say it) Glock 26 I can practice with...for now. That will help with the position of my trigger finger. Nothing as good as practice with the pistol you’re going to carry every day though. Buggers.
 

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I ordered this today. https://www.itargetpro.com For 9 mm. I will report back how it worked when I get it. And maybe do a review elsewhere here. Can’t hurt to try it.
This alternative is expensive, but I can say I really like my SIRT pistol.
https://nextleveltraining.com/product/sirt-110-training-pistol-2/

I got the 107 Model that has functional features of the Smith & Wesson M&P.

At the Tanner gun show, there is always a vendor who sells training time. He has a demo set up for people to try as a selling aid. He uses SIRT pistols at the beginning of the course, then moves on to the real thing later on thus saving a lot of ammo. He was nice enough to let me try the SIRT pistol before I actually ordered one. Maybe there are some training courses or gun ranges with virtual training that might let you try one out.

Couple the SIRT with a laptop or desktop, a web cam, and some software and I really like how it all works together. You can buy software from Next Level Training, or go with some freeware.
Sharp Spotter

See this thread where I review Sharp Spotter
https://www.waltherforums.com/forum...shooter-home-laser-shooting-range-review.html

When at the Sharp Spotter site, on the left side, click on "Run Modes".
At the bottom is "Diagnostic Mode" which will do what Imaoldfart suggested. Usually the program uses the spot where the laser first hits and ignores the rest. In Diagnostic Mode, it keeps reading the laser movement until you release the trigger. Then you can really see how much the gun is moving. It's bad when you pull the trigger and a Happy Face appears on the screen. :eek:

Anyway, for what it is worth. Kinda of expensive, but It's what a lot of law enforcement departments are using for training.

Pudge
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ok, iTarget came through for me (and they didn’t charge me extra for this end piece). They have a better stricking end for the CCP. Although it says on their website that it may not work with the CCP and the PPS, this new part enables it to work with the CCP. I like it. I can still use it with the Glock, but I prefer to use it with the pistol I’m going to carry. So, if anyone is interested make sure you tell them which pistol you have. This is really going to help, but I still need lots of range time.
 
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