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Discussion Starter #1
Carl Walther came up with the 1936 Walther Olympia in time for the 1936 Olympics and the advanced design was so superior that it helped Germany to win several gold medals by eliminating the fliers caused by the old striker fired pistols. After WWII, when Germany wasn't allowed to manufacture firearms Carl Walther negotiated a deal with Hammerli in Lenzburg, Switzerland. Hammerli produced a version of the Olympic pistols starting with the Hammerli Walther Model 200 and they evolved from there to the Hammerli International that we all are more familiar with. Hammerli did not print the 208 model number on them but named them International. The .22 l.r. models were the 208 with target grips and an adjustable palm rest, the 211 with a sport grip with a thumb rest and the Jaegerschaftspistole with a similiar grip as the 211 but without thumbrest. These old Lenzburg guns are very well made and have incredibly good trigger characteristics, the later models had a more adjustable trigger but the price to manufacture the pistol was finally prohibitive and the 208S and 215S were discontinued.

The Hammerli 212 is one of the guns that has and will continue to accompany me to the gun range and be in the range bag every time! As a young man I had competed in state matches with either a Gehmann GSP or a Hammerli International with Cesare Morini grips, the GSP was more sports equipment than a firearm and was sold, unfortunately.

A Hammerli International in 208 configuration with the standard weight:


The same gun in 211 configuration:


A Hammerli 212 Jagerschaftspistole with the safety that was required by the DJV rulebook



The International with a different set of 212 grips and different weights,installed is the heavy factory weight but the others are custom-made weights.
 

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Oddly, the Hammerli Trailside is mechanically similar (tho' nowhere near as expensive). It shares the low bore axis, tho' the rear sight is (less ideally) on the slide. The trigger on mine is an absolute delight.
The same gun is now marketed by Walther.
Thanks for the history lesson, Andy.
Moon
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Oddly, the Hammerli Trailside is mechanically similar (tho' nowhere near as expensive). It shares the low bore axis, tho' the rear sight is (less ideally) on the slide. The trigger on mine is an absolute delight.
The same gun is now marketed by Walther.
Thanks for the history lesson, Andy.
Moon
Moon,

the Trailside shares the looks with the Hammerli International but has less parts and it a much simplified version. When compared side by side, the higher cost of the International can be understood right away; it oozes quality. It is about the same difference as a Swiss P210 compared to an American SIG Sauer P210A.
 

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Andy, never meant to claim equal quality; just appearance. I've a German P230 that is wonderfully made; the Trailside is not in that league.
That said, it's not hard to figure what inspired the T'side design, and the trigger is better than a now-departed Smith 41.
Moon
ETA- presume the bridged rear sight shown above must be removed to fieldstrip?
M
 
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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Moon,

you are correct, the rear sight of the International has to be unscrewed and removed to the rear in order to take the slide off.
I never cleaned the Hammerli International as diligently and regularly as I clean my centerfire guns but it still ran reliably.

I had imported the Hammerli myself and had to make and fit a safety in order to comply with ATF import regulations.
 

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As Andy says, the Hammerli oozes quality-- like expensive perfume. But what's remarkable is that the Trailside is such a good gun for what it is. Hammerli took the basic layout of the 200-series and totally re-engineered and re-designed it to be manufactured as cheaply as possible by modern methods with practically no hand work. It looks a bit toy-like, but it's steel-framed, shoots well, and has a nice trigger.
I bought a slightly-used one a few years ago for $375, which won't take you very far toward a 200-series, but it will more than hold its own against a Buckmark or Ruger.

M
 

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I just got hammerli walther olumpia 0-5404 with weights and all like to know year of it please help nice pistol cant wait to shoot it thanks rallinkuski
 
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