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Well, if John Browning says it's so, then it is. But don't tell me what Wikipedia says. It isn't good enough for students to use.

Let us split some hairs.

You could lay a semi-automatic AK or AR-15 next to a full-auto (or semi-full auto) AK or M-16 and if the side with the safety/selector switch were on the other side, you probably couldn't tell them apart. They look the same, they weigh the same, they take the same cartridge and the same magazines. One has a rate of fire of, oh, perhaps five times as fast as the other, so arguing about whether something is an assault rifle or not is like arguing whether or not a shotgun is a sporting weapon. In fact, the Germans originally called them machine pistols until someone came up with a name that sounded better, which was literally "storm rifle."
 

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Did I ever say I think assault rifles should be banned?

Who was it who say what an assault rifle was to begin with? Was it the same one who defined a Saturday night special or a hair trigger? Or a Scout Rifle (please note the caps)? An assault rifle clearly doesn't need to be in an intermediate caliber. You see, what I'm getting at is that the term is merely a sensationalist media term that has been ever since some German coined a term that sounded better than machine pistol or plain old rifle.

Does a bullet become deadlier if fired from an assault rifle any more than one with a high capacity magazine (or clip) from anything? Does a rose by any other name not have thorns? Does the army offically call the M-16 an assault rifle? Does any army?
 

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I'm not sure how we got from there to here, but let's try to take it back again ... to the original point of the thread. If we want to argue the merits of what is or is not an assault rifle, let's start up another thread with a proper title and keep the conversation polite along the way. Thanks, guys.
 

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I think I discovered a magazine that had no springs, since I mentioned there are clips with springs. For the gold star, what gun was it for (warning: there may be more than one gun but I'm only thinking of one). Hint: Walther did not make it.
 

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I don't think Lewis gun magazines had springs. In fact, I doubt any pan-type magazine had springs, although some versions of the Lewis gun had a spring that rotated the magazine. You see, the cartridges, uh, clipped into place.
 

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........
I don't know when people got all anally retentive about differentiating between a magazine and a clip. To me it seems to be much ado about nothing. If I say my SIG P226 uses a 15 shot clip, does anyone think I am referring to a pre-loaded strip of cartridges like an M1 Garand uses? I doubt it. And to be honest. I like using the term clip for all my handguns. Why? Two reasons...
1. Because that's the way I was taught
2. It always seems to piss off the anally retentive definition Nazi who insists that people use HIS description over any other. Just call me a rebel. :D
SARCASM MODE ON:
I prefer to be a revolutionary or a rebel; not a "patriot." However, as we all know, if you call a magazine a clip, the bullet will not know which way it is supposed to go and the pointy end will not come out of the end of the barrel because it is too embarrassed about its owner.
 

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Pierre - roger that. Use of correct terminology is essential to good training. I doubt any US Marine DI has ever called a pistol "magazine" a "clip." As to the movies, Hollywood will use any term that improves audience understanding. Even today, a "throw me a magazine" line in a movie would likely cause some viewers to wonder why reading material would be so important in the middle of a fire fight.
 

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I don't think Lewis gun magazines had springs. In fact, I doubt any pan-type magazine had springs, although some versions of the Lewis gun had a spring that rotated the magazine. You see, the cartridges, uh, clipped into place.
I just noticed this. Blue Train is almost correct that Lewis pans do not have springs -- at least not for feeding cartridges. There is, however, a spring on the hub powering the latch that secures the pan to the gun. For feeding cartridges, the necessary springs --mostly flat leaf-type or coiled clock-type-- are tucked away inside the gun.

I just imagined that everyone was dying to know...

M
 
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