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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
From what I read, Glock abandoned the Tenifer (ferric nitrocarburizing) surface treatment in favor of gas nitriding, though they're still showing "Tenifer" on parts of their website.

I've heard some contradictory information regarding Tenifer (by whatever name) in Germany; one that Walther still uses it, and two that it isn't allowed any longer in Germany.

Can someone help me with some up-to-date information, please?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, I saw a discussion in which a Glock Technical Services rep stated they were using "gas nitriding," as I mentioned. It's still a surface hardening, but doesn't leave as many nasty byproducts, so I have no problem with Glock's approach.

I'm wondering about Walther's, however, since I haven't seen any discussions regarding a change from them. If indeed Germany no longer allows it (speculation), would Walther change processes or would they perhaps treat their pistols where laws are more lax?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Are there coatings that are better than others? Or, are they all about the same?
Don't know, but there must have been a reason to use one over the other. You can google "ferric nitrocarburizing" and "gas nitriding," and there are lots of specialty tratment shops that discuss them.

I just want to know what Walther is using, and if Tenifer, how they're managing to do it and what they intend in the future.
 

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In the most basic terms, it's like a salt water bath. If you expose steel to water, especially salt water, it rusts right?

So this special, specifically composed nitrided salt bath, rusts the outer layer of our slides and barrels... but in such a specific way as to cause that layer to be hardened and corrosion proof (as technically it's already "corroded");instead of just becoming a layer of rusty corrosion, as if you dropped it in the ocean and left it there a while.

As for method? If they're gassing them instead of bathing them, it should do the same thing, but gassing just sounds like a cleaner process.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
In the most basic terms, it's like a salt water bath. If you expose steel to water, especially salt water, it rusts right?

So this special, specifically composed nitrided salt bath, rusts the outer layer of our slides and barrels... but in such a specific way as to cause that layer to be hardened and corrosion proof (as technically it's already "corroded");instead of just becoming a layer of rusty corrosion, as if you dropped it in the ocean and left it there a while.

As for method? If they're gassing them instead of bathing them, it should do the same thing, but gassing just sounds like a cleaner process.
From what I now understand, you're right. Here's a quote from http://www.rowantechnology.com/wp-c...ating-Alternatives.pdf#page=6&zoom=auto,0,254
The most widely used surface modifications are nitriding, carburizing and nitrocarburizing. Older processes used to involve the use of molten salt baths
(frequently cyanides) or packed beds, but these methods have been largely displaced by gas methods of nitriding, carburizing and nitrocarburizing, and by plasma nitriding.
It appears to be progress, so I'm not concerned about its quality. I'd still like to know what Walther's doing, though.
 
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