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Hello fellow members.

I have recently acquired a Walther .22 rifle, I believe it is a KK Match, perhaps dating between 1975 and 1985. This is mostly based on the limited info I got from the original owner, plus photos and comparisons with photos of other rifles (As the rifle didn't come with any of the original documentation)

The rifle came to me customised in a more modern aluminium stock, but I have since restocked it in its original wooden stock as you can see in the picture. The main trouble I have currently is that I am not certain about how much I should tighten the screws that hold the barrel onto the stock... if I tighten either of these too much, either the bolt doesn't close, or the barrel is pointing downwards.. so I have had trouble operating it since I have re-stocked.

Any technical information, or original documentation, help identifying it or any other tips from fellow owners on how to set it up properly would be highly appreciated...
 

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... I am not certain about how much I should tighten the screws that hold the barrel onto the stock... if I tighten either of these too much, either the bolt doesn't close, or the barrel is pointing downwards.. so I have had trouble operating it since I have re-stocked.
....
This is a fairly common problem encountered when a rifle is re-stocked.
Fundamentally, the stock is not correctly inletted for that barreled action.

It might be that the stock was originally fitted to a barreled action of different dimensions (especially a lighter barrel profile), or the stock might be warped, or was never properly fitted in the first place, or there's some high spot (wood or metal) that interferes with the barreled action sitting level and at the correct depth in the wood. Old-time stocktakers used lampblack or prussian blue to reveal the contact points and achieve a good fit.

When correctly bedded, the receiver should rest in a neutral state in which the action screws, when tightened, draw it down evenly and do not distort it. The barrel then must separately bedded to be either free-floating, or with some upward pressure at the forend tip -- whichever is preferred.

Judging whether the inletting should be corrected by shimming up or cutting down calls for careful analysis and some experience as well as skill to avoid making matters worse or creating a new problem one didn't have before. It's a job for a workshop, not a kitchen table...

M
 

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Discussion Starter #3
When correctly bedded, the receiver should rest in a neutral state in which the action screws, when tightened, draw it down evenly and do not distort it. The barrel then must separately bedded to be either free-floating, or with some upward pressure at the forend tip -- whichever is preferred.
Hi - thank you this is all, useful. The stock and barrel are the original pair - previous owner had changed to a more modern metal stock. So the barrel fitted naturally back to the stock... its a free floating barrel - as it was previously.

What I'm looking for is the recommended tension for the two retaining bolts. Of course I could take it to a workshop - but that would take all the fun out of owning a rifle... show me one member who hasn't fiddled with their rifle now and then ;-) I'm trying to err on the side of caution currently, this is why I'm asking for support.
 

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eleven_west;1224808... What I'm looking for is the recommended tension for the two retaining bolts. ....[/QUOTE said:
If the receiver bedding is correct, the exact torque on the screws won't matter. Just turn them down tight; you don't have to be a gorilla. The fact that you are distorting the receiver enough to interfere with bolt travel tells me that something is obviously wrong with the bedding.


M
 
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