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Discussion Starter #1
Several weeks ago I experienced the dreaded squib round while shooting my Ruger LCP .380. It was the final round of Hornady Critical Defense .380 90gr cartridges in my 6-shot magazine, making the expected muted "poof" sound sound and no cycling of the slide.

Upon following the usual safety rules of a discharged squib round, I examined the firearm.

The empty case remained in the chamber with no residual powder in it upon manually ejecting it. The bullet itself was obviously propelled by only the primer to make its way down to become lodged in the nose of the barrel. (See below photo.)

I've experienced a number of squib rounds over the years with both faulty reloads and cheap off-brand ammo. However, this is the first time it has happened to me with a high-end "premium" cartridge.





I contacted Hornady's customer service department to advise them of this occurrence and they were very courteous, apologetic and exhibited the expected concern. They said that this was only the second time that a squib round was reported since the Critical Defense series hit the market. And, they were nice enough to send me a new box of .380 ammo.

Anyway, I'm simply posting this as an FYI and nothing derogatory towards Hornady or their products. After all, mistakes during manufacturing do happen. Matter of fact, I will continue to carry Hornady Critical Duty rounds in all of my 9mm and .40 auto defense handguns.

(The good news is, this event did not occur during an actual self-defense scenario. Nor did another live round cycle into the chamber behind the barrel-lodged bullet.)
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
By the way, the bullet ended up pretty snug in the barrel. I soaked the inside of the barrel (from the rear end) with Break-Free gun oil, let it sit for a couple days and then tapped the bullet out from the rear with a wooden dowel rod. No functional damage occurred to my Ruger LCP.
 

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This is a good illustration that we need to be vigilant for misfires and such in our weapons regardless of the ammunition used. I, too, like Hornady and have no beef with them but I've had misfires from Federal and Winchester in the past and they are not off-brands or hand loads.
 

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If you found no unburned grains of powder in the bore, then the cartridge apparently was loaded without propellant.

No need for the soaking routine, however. I've removed dozens of jacketed bullets that were stuck in the bores of pistols used in drop-testing, deliberately induced by pulling the bullet, dumping the powder and re-seating the bullet in the case.

Just remove the barrel, insert into the chamber end a hardwood dowel that closely but freely fits the bore, and whack it out with a mallet. Knock it out in the same direction the bullet was traveling. Two or three hits usually will do it, since the base of the bullet will not have been expanded by pressure. If you're in the field you can do this dry (it won't hurt anything) or if you're in the shop, spray a little lubricant into the muzzle first to ease the bullet's path.

M
 

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I had a Premium Defense round not go off a dozen years ago and dissected the round. It turned out that the primer had no anvil.

If you shoot a lot, you can statistically expect see things like that more often:D.
 

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The uncommon nature of squibs is what makes them so dangerous. A too-light .45 round (my reload; I wanted light loads) hung its bullet; I racked the slide and popped one behind it. The 645 really recoiled, and I knew what I'd done. Still have the barrel, and show it in our handgun class.
A fellow shooter with a .32 target revolver squibbed his first round, and fired four more down behind it. The barrel was ruined trying to drive them out (from the wrong direction, Mike).
Pay attention to 'pop' rather than 'bang'.
Moon
 
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Fifty five years ago when I complained to a master gunnery sergeant about the performance of a M1911 that his armorer unit had worked on he said: "There is no such thing a perfect. That is why you train to deal with the unexpected." Enough said.
 
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This is a mega squib mishap. The revolver is a 629 Smith & Wesson 44 magnum. Always pay close attention and be safe and always think before you put that finger on that trigger
 

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