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At least in Germany the problem described in the letter is completely unknown.
After WW2 several P38 with steel frame produced before WW2 and while WW2 have been used by the German Police and even higher quantities of such P38 were in use by the Austrian police and military. These German and Austrian facilities have never reported such safety problem, not to mention that it ever was reported by soldiers while WW2.
That's why I think that this letter is nonsense .
 

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Case in point, this tool who got his letter printed in the latest issue of Guns and Ammo.

The idiot who wrote this letter is missing the bigger point.


Firearms, even ones with lever style safeties, MUST be treated as if they are loaded and in the "fire" condition.


I've made the point in prior posts that manual safety levers and uneducated firearm handlers are a deadly mix. That safe position makes idiots think it's OK to play the stupid games, and win the stupid prizes.


Only morons bet their life, and the lives of others on a mechanism that can fail. That would be ALL mechanisms.
 

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He's been flogging that line of "reasoning" for some time. He has the exact statement in American Gunsmith in 2011. Also, there is no listing (anywhere as far as I can tell) for any "Wye river arsenal".
 

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In the world of firearms I have run across many, many people who think they are experts and infallible. I’m not quite sure where they come from. Perhaps this phenomenon exists in other hobbies or lines of work, but it sure is prevalent in firearms.

I had the good fortune of my father being friends with one of only a dozen or so licensed machinegun collectors in my (very class III UNfriendly) state. Due to this, by the time I was 21, I had fired over 100 different machineguns, rebuilt a couple rare WWII MGs, loaded ammo for them, gone to machinegun shoots (in other states), etc. Well, I go to the police academy, and the (self-important) “highly qualified” “Master Firearms Instructor” answered a question about us being outgunned with our 357 wheelguns against gangbangers with “machineguns?” The instructor said he wished all the badguys had machineguns, because they are so uncontrollable, noone shooting one can hit anything with one. My 21-yr-old smart-as$ kid brain decided to scoff at him. The next day I had an M-3 Greasegun at the range and dumped the whole mag on full auto inside the 8-ring of a B-27 at 25 yards. He never liked me after that... :D
 

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Seems like somebody had a negligent discharge (as opposed to accidental discharge) throwing a loaded handgun around? Well how about that, must have been the gun's fault! If you have that problem I'd suggest buying a Glock, according to YouTube they can be thrown from an airplane or in a lake without any problems and more importantly: This will put the gun in a safe place where you won't be able to get your hands on it anymore.

I have never heard of the problem the author describes, but it's quite well known that the slides on the WWII P.38 can crack. That's reason enough not to shoot them.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'll continue to shoot mine. Not every week or month, but a couple of times a year for a few mags. Winchester White Box 115 only, and I won't carry a 75 year old pistol or design (excepting the 1911), but if it breaks, it effing breaks. Otherwise I could just print a picture of one and look at it.
 

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The article is pretty stupid in its radicalism ...
But there is a grain of truth there.
All Walhters with a safe on the slider have a problem. The design is too sophisticated. Walhter had a long and sad story with this. Which (as the name implies) ended in nothing.
When the hammer is reset with a safe many times, crumple of parts may occur, which causes their abnormal interaction. This is especially true for pistols made from war-time-edition parts.

PS Do not judge too strictly ... ;-)
 

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Yes, the Walther safety is complex. Logic would dictate that the failure rate would be greater then a simpler design. But, the inescapable fact is the firearms "safety" is the person holding it/proper instruction and oversight of the person the owner allows to handle it. The "Root Cause" of the story is human error/careless handling/improper oversight or supervision.


From post 5 "a mechanism that can fail. That would be ALL mechanisms.", anyone who touches a firearm must learn it, know it, and LIVE it.
 
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Am I missing something... “a WWII relic, once cocked, will fire...”

Well, yeah....

I have an old P38... once a round is in the chamber it stays pointed down range.... especially while decocking. Well, yeah.

I don’t carry anything made before I was born with a round in the chamber.... a rule we can live by


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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...once a round is in the chamber it stays pointed down range...
Actually, this is a normal form of behavior at a shooting range ...
Do not find? ;-)

And probably, we should distinguish between how to handle weapons depending on the situation. If this is a carrying (or storage) for self-defense, then the weapon should be as ready as possible for immediate use.
And if the gun is in a locked box in the trunk, then it hardly makes sense to keep it loaded.

Indeed, it should ALWAYS treat weapons as charged. But it is hardly necessary to always (just in case) treat him as a faulty one ... ;-)
In fact, the old Walthers have a pretty good safe. And the trigger system itself is quite safe even when the safe is blocked. So they did with the worn out Walthers, in which the safe spontaneously turns "on" when fired. They simply jammed the safe lever in the "off" position with a match or a piece of copper wire.
Well, "the main safe is in the men’s head."

PS It is ridiculous to watch how someone, filming a video, with his tongue sticking out with effort, follows the rules of treatment.
But it’s even funnier to see clowns who are outraged if they see a “violation” in the video. LOL

PPS It doesn't matter how old the device is. The only important thing is how good it is.
As practice shows, some newfangled crafts (we will not point fingers ;-)) are much more dangerous to use than antiques in the hands of a competent user.
 

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The longer this thread runs the more I am reminded why many people who wish to carry still opt for small transfer bar revolvers in potent calibers. The thought of accidentally dropping a pistol and having it discharge is scary as it gets.
 

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A matter of preference.
But whatever they say, revolvers are both more reliable and safer than auto-pistols.
Especially given the quality of work of current mass manufacturers.
Even a lousy-made revolver is still more reliable than a anyhow-made pistol.

PS Looking at the "new" models, it seems that SolidWorks began to teach elementary schools and organize "pistol design competition." LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #18
A matter of preference.
But whatever they say, revolvers are both more reliable and safer than auto-pistols.
Especially given the quality of work of current mass manufacturers.
Even a lousy-made revolver is still more reliable than a anyhow-made pistol.

Consider yourself included in the group of people this thread title refers to, stupid people stating stupid opinions quite confidently.
 

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Consider yourself included in the group of people this thread title refers to, stupid people stating stupid opinions quite confidently.
Are you talking to the mirror?
Commendable self-criticism ... LOL

I happened to see a lot of revolvers.
Everyones and different.
Including British revolvers made at the turn of the century. Worn out so that it’s scary to shoot from them.
And the Russian Nagants made of **** steel became hungry teens.
And various modern revolvers made at the lowest cost, including home-made ones.

All of them, obliquely and crookedly, but work.

And now, compare the reliability of, say, the original Walthers with fakes from Interarms ... LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Röhm revolvers, proudly made in Germany. Coming apart in your hands while you merely look at them.
 
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