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Discussion Starter #1
Is there any reason (mechanically speaking) not to store a q45 with a full magazine and the slide locked in the open position?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Actually, it is a good way to let dust, dirt and grime (or other larger objects) into the exposed chamber.
True- but it’s stored inside a sealed bedside safe. Not super concerned with dirt and grime in there. More curious about any effects it might have on the springs?
 

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Is there any reason to store it that way? If there is, I'd like to hear the reasoning behind it.

The reason I would think not to, would be the recoil spring. That is the only part that may wear by doing this.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Is there any reason to store it that way? If there is, I'd like to hear the reasoning behind it.

The reason I would think not to, would be the recoil spring. That is the only part that may wear by doing this.
I’ve got a buddy that’s an amputee. He doesn’t wear his prosthetic when he sleeps, which makes it difficult to rack one-handed. He can open his safe one handed, and able to grab the gun out of the safe, but in a SHTF scenario, is concerned with accidentally discharging the weapon in the safe if it loaded, as the only safety is the trigger safety on this weapon.
 

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I think I have a better understanding of the issue now.

I wouldn't have much of an issue keeping the slide locked to the rear if I routinely tested the pistol and changed recoil spring assemblies when necessary. If the pistol is going to be kept in the safe for months or years on end without ever getting shot, I'm not sure it is as good of an idea. There are many designs out there that would more than likely function just fine after having the slide locked back for a while, but I can't say with any certainty if the 99-series pistols are one of them. I've never done it for any significant amount of time, and I'm not aware of anyone else who has either.

I would support his decision to protect his home with a firearm, but I would also advise him to just keep the pistol loaded, for more reasons than one. Dropping the slide in the middle of a quiet night would seem like an easy way to tell where in a house an armed person is.

There is a local SW99 armor I run into from time to time. The next time I do, I'll see if I can ask this question.
 

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The world is about equally divided on whether keeping a spring fully compressed for a long time is harmful, or whether a spring wears out only from cycling.

I don't pretend to know the scientific answer, but I just don't like the idea of keeping the recoil spring (and the hammer spring) under full load. Whether I'm right or wrong, no harm will be done to the spring(s); that's a 50% better chance of avoiding a problem than dissenters have.

M
 

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Question makes sense now in context, but I believe the trigger safety would be better relied upon than leaving it open. No questioning of your friend's abilities, but I worry that moving the slide single-handedly to close in an adrenaline cloud introduces more 'moving parts/actions' (including pinching the slide with a sheet, shirt, etc rendering it inoperable) and also raises the chance of inadvertently placing the trigger against the trigger finger, whereas simply grabbing the weapon already in battery and holding until the target is identified may be more reliable. Just my opinion, and I haven't one about the spring tension. Just about the operations involved.
 

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I won’t pretend to know the answer but a spring is a spring. And it’s been drilled in to me that keeping a magazine loaded for years at a time doesn’t do anything to the magazine spring. So I’m kinda hard pressed to come up with anything rational as to why a recoil spring would be any different??
 

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I was under the impression just sitting loaded, or unloaded won't do any harm to the magazine. It's repeated compression and decompression that wears it out eventually.
 

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I was under the impression just sitting loaded, or unloaded won't do any harm to the magazine. It's repeated compression and decompression that wears it out eventually.
Here is the recommendation from Wolff Springs:

5. How often should I change magazine spring? Should I unload my magazines, rotate magazines, load with fewer than the maximum rounds?

Magazine springs in semi-auto pistols are one of the most critical springs and are the subject of much debate and concern. Magazines which are kept fully loaded for long periods of time, such as in law enforcement and personal/home defense applications, will generally be subject to more fatigue than the weekend shooter's magazine springs in which the magazines are loaded up only when shooting.
Magazine design and capacity also affect the longevity of the spring. In many older pistol designs, maximum capacity was not the always the goal such as with the 7 round 1911 Colt magazines will last for years fully loaded. There was room for more spring material in these guns which reduces overall stress and increases the usable life of the spring.
More recently higher capacity magazine have become popular. These are designed to hold more rounds with less spring material often in the same space. This puts more stress on the spring and will cause it to fatigue at a faster rate. Unloading these magazines a round or two will help the life of the spring. Rotating fully loaded magazines will also help the problem somewhat but it is not always practical.
In applications where the magazine must be kept loaded at all times, a high quality magazine spring such as Wolff extra power magazine springs, will provide maximum life. Regular replacement of magazine springs will provide the best defense against failure from weak magazine springs. Regular shooting of the pistol is the best way to be sure the springs are still functioning reliably.
https://www.gunsprings.com/index.php?page=FAQ#question5

Here is an excerpt from Chuck Taylor's Glock torture test:

During this initial phase, I also wore out several sets of magazines, noting that the follower springs tended to get soft after a month or so if the magazines were left fully loaded with 17 rounds. As a result, after replacing the springs, I decided to experiment a bit, loading them with only 15 rounds instead of the usual 17.
Within a short period of time, it became obvious that the remedy worked. The magazines functioned perfectly even after extended time periods when so loaded. In fact, though they’re the old type that didn’t drop freely from the weapon, I still have four of them and even after thousands and thousands of rounds, and they still work reliably.
https://www.tactical-life.com/combat-handguns/glock-17-9mm-torture-test/

There were multiple members of the FN forum that stated that FN told them directly that the FNX 9 mags should not be loaded and carried to capacity, and inserted in the pistol. Their mag springs apparently went bad after just being loaded to 17rds, and having that mag inserted in the pistol for a matter of weeks.

It seems like it is up to the design, and the quality of the spring. I'm not sure if anyone has ever tried locking the slide back on a 99-series pistol for any decent length of time, and then made a report saying what they found out by doing so. But, there are reports of springs in pistols failing simply by being compressed.
 

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I’ll throw in one more scenario that supports keeping one in the chamber while locked up. This is age related but most of those who have wives will probably find that they have a very difficult time racking the slide on many semi autos. Should there ever be a case where the wife or responsible child ever has to use the gun to stop an attack. I feel better knowing they do not have to struggle with racking a slide. I can replace springs but I can’t replace a loved one.
 

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ANY steel spring has the property of getting tired under load.
And the more compressed the spring, the faster it gets tired.
The cartridge in the chamber, not cocked hammer and half-capacity mags load is good for long-term storage. (If it's legal, of course) ;-)
 

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Good stuff all of this. Heres a Lucky Gunner article that references what’s been mentioned here as well as factors not mentioned here that make this a long running debate. Acknowledging the OP was originally speaking about leaving a slide opened, again this is all about the physics of a spring and hope the magazine discussion will apply as well.

https://www.luckygunner.com/lounge/magazine-springs-and-ammo-cycling/
 

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Acknowledging the OP was originally speaking about leaving a slide opened, again this is all about the physics of a spring and hope the magazine discussion will apply as well.
After talking with Wolff and FN I have to say the article is absolutely correct. I asked Wolff if they had and were willing to share test data that demonstrated the "average" life of their magazine springs. The lady I spoke with went to the owner and returned with a response that the information was proprietary which suggests to me their springs are not materially superior compared to OEM springs. The individual at FN came much closer to confirming what the article described re material, production, maintenance and environmental factors. Their bottom line was the springs could last a very long time....years if conditions were good.
 

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Your link does not open with me... Is there another?

The material is a lot, but not all.
We live in the real world, and s*** happens...
Even a reliable manufacturer can have deviations in quality.
There may also be local damage to the surface of the spring. Scratches, dents, corrosion marks. All these are possible causes of problems.
This especially applies to such heavily operating springs as the recoil springs.
Therefore, in any case, the recoil springs should not be left for a long time in a compressed state.
Mag. springs operating in relatively light conditions are less prone to problems. But if, for a long time, there is no way to verify them, it will be better to store them in a state of not more than 50-70% of the full load.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Your link does not open with me... Is there another?

The material is a lot, but not all.
We live in the real world, and s*** happens...
Even a reliable manufacturer can have deviations in quality.
There may also be local damage to the surface of the spring. Scratches, dents, corrosion marks. All these are possible causes of problems.
This especially applies to such heavily operating springs as the recoil springs.
Therefore, in any case, the recoil springs should not be left for a long time in a compressed state.
Mag. springs operating in relatively light conditions are less prone to problems. But if, for a long time, there is no way to verify them, it will be better to store them in a state of not more than 50-70% of the full load.
So, to your point, any idea what percentage of load a spring would be under in the locked open position?
 
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