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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all!

I know this is a p99 forum, and I do have a p99. The reason I am asking about p22 is that I have to practice a lot (and I mean a lot) to master these new skills. You see, I've never fired a pistol until I got p99 (that happened 3 weeks ago). My accuracy is poor and I start to feel the ammo cost already. What is your honest opinion: will a Walther p22 help? .22 ammo is very cheap and I can shoot as often as I wish. Is anyone here has a p22 as a "training" pair to his/her p99? Does shooting a p22 help to master a p99? I'd be greatful if you give me some advise.

My gun shop has one on sale now (in a showcase, not on backorder list!), 5 barrel, for $329.

Thanks in advance,
take care

Val
 

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I have a P22 with 3.4" barrel to keep my P99 company myself .
The firing mechanism is not the same as on P99 , but a traditional DA with a manual safety . I'm happy with it . As the gun is new it functions best with high velocity ammo , heard it takes about 500 rounds to break it in , than it should get less picky .
Vic
 

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Seems like it would help...I dry fire my P99 to get the feel without the kick, seems like a logical step to go to something with a little kick. If nothing else you practice your stance, breathing, consentration, etc.
 

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I have both, and find that the P22 is a good companion.
Mainly due to the magazine release location.
Plus, the P22 is just a neat little gun.
 

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Everybody should have a .22, both rifle and pistol. The P22 would be a great companion to your P99. Even though its not exactly alike, it is similar enough to your P99 to help as a training aid.

I love mine and do use it as a training companion to my P99.
 

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Val,

The P-22 is interesting, but you'd be better served by taking the money you'd spend on a P22 and taking some basic and intermediate handgun classes. You might as well train on the pistol you're going to use as opposed to getting used to the recoil and feel of the pistol you won't use. -Additionally, you can benefit by dryfiring with snapcaps. That will give you the no-recoil trigger pull practice.

Good luck

 

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I'm with Breaker on this one. If you want the P22 just to have a .22 caliber fun gun, then by all means go for it. I love my P22. It's almost like a "mini" P99. But it will make a poor training aid to your P99 as the feel is very different. The size is smaller as is the grip. The recoil is different in that there is barely any. The trigger feel is very, very different. $329 can get you quite a bit of 9mm ammo.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you guys.

I do think now I should spend this $$ for instructor and ammo. If I really get hooked on target shooting I can always buy a .22 later. If I don't, I will end up with a "fun gun" without a purpose.

I was considering this .22 for I got really desperate yesterday at the range. I can say my groups looked good: after firing 20 rounds at 7 yards there was a hole in a target the size of a silver dollar (there were a few "flyers", too
). The reason for despare was that this hole was 4" to the left from the bulleye. I gonna take my time and practice.

This is very frustrating because I used to be a good shot with AK-47 (no scope). Apparently, pistols is a different story.

Thanks again, your input helped a lot!

Take care,
Val
 

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Pistols are a different story. In fact different pistols are different stories. The P99 is my first hand gun also and it took about a 1000 rounds and some informal instruction before I could shoot close to as well as I was shooting a borrowed Les Baer 1911. I think it is the trigger pull that is different. I am planning on taking the basic class. I'm sure it will help but I really am taking it because its a pre-req for the CCW/defense class I want to take.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You know, this may be the case here. I was pretty good with my friend's 1911 .45AP and Ruger Service Six revolver. I was actually hitting places I was aiming at. Especially with the revolver. It seems it was much easier for me with heavy, all-steel pistols. Could it be a balance, trigger pull? The bottom line, I gonna get a "professional help"


Take care,
Val
 

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Snap caps hidden in my mag really helped my accuracy with the P99. I have my friend load my mag with one or more. I don't know how many or where they are at and was amazed at how much the gun moved when I hit one. By far the single best thing I did to improve my accuracy.
 

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There is an example target cut up into pie shapes that represent what you might be doing when a bullet goes into a specific section consistently.

I can’t seem to find the link. I do however remember that shooting to the left is indicative of your trigger finger being too far over the trigger- next to the first joint. You’re pushing the gun to the left with your trigger finger (if you shoot right-handed.)

In reality the trigger should be resting right in the middle of the pad of your last joint and you should be pulling strait back.

HTH
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thank you for the link!
My diagnosis is clear: too little trigger finger. What does that mean? Does that mean the handle is too big for my hands and I don't have enough "reach"? I am using the smallest grip insert because my hands are kind of small. My finger feels comfortable on the trigger.
Anyway, what does "too little trigger finger" means?

Val
 
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