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Inspirational posting PilotSteve

After reading your experience cleaning your PPK I am inspired to consider similar on mine. No issues with mine in the short while I have had her, but I have no idea of how previous owner(s) may have treated her.
Thankfully, this site provides an abundance of information on stripping the weapon past the field level.
 

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Stripping tool recommendation...

I just took my PP and my neighbor's PP apart to replace old springs and I used a dental tool called a "pick" and another called a "hockey stick" to assist me and those tools really helped! I bought mine at a gun show several years ago and I'll buy more the next time I find them. Makes taking guns apart and putting them back together much easier!
 

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Old dental picks have many uses. I've been able to collect a variety of them through the years by simply asking my dentist for his castoffs. I'll often use them for small engine repair and parts cleaning, removing dirt and grit from the grooves on golf clubs (they are especially good on wedges), etc. It wouldn't hurt to have one or two on hand -- just ask the next time you go in for your regular checkup.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Wow you guys are right. Putting the slide back together sure required patience and a couple of "special" tools to get the parts back into place. I took on the task earlier today.

First, thanks to Kurt_D's input I was confident how the loaded chamber indicator mechanism went back together. The spring fits over the pin with the protuberance toward the machined end... the long straight portion of the pin gets the long unhindered part of the spring. It must be placed back into the slide by positioning the rear (hammer end) of the pin through the hole, then by making certain the protuberance is facing down (toward the top of the slide, the pin can be eased rearward and down until it clicks home. Be certain it went into it's proper place and NOT into the hole of the firing pin! Once it's in there it will not pose any further problem and stays put.

Next is a challenge! You've to accomplish three tasks at once! One, the firing pin must go into it's home, two, the ejector, spring, and safety catch must go into their proper places, and three, the safety drum/lever much be placed into the slide to hold everything together. Here's how I did it... and it was an exercise in patience!

First, I placed the ejector spring into it's tunnel with the pin side going in first from the ejector side of the slide. There is one side with a conical pin which engages the safety drum's divots to lock it into the safe/fire position and another side with a tabbed steel part which holds the ejector in place and provides spring force to it. Make certain the spring goes into the slide with the conical pin going in first. Next, place the ejector into the slide... don't worry it can only go in one way.

Next is the fun part. The firing pin has a rather stout spring about it as well as a square machined portion toward the back which must fit into the square recess in the slide. And believe me, when you're trying to guide the pin home it just loves to try and twist this way & that without easily going into the squared slot. This is where three hands can be handy! When you've finally got the firing pin into the slot, you must press it forward enough so you can replace the safety drum/lever. Again, it can only go in one way. Insert it into the slide until it's past the firing pin then you can let the firing pin go. It will rest against the safety drum with no more fear of it going, "Boing!" and disappearing.

Now come tricky part number three. You should be able to see the conical portion of the ejector spring in the slide and it must be pressed into its tunnel before the safety drum/lever can be brought home. I used a long thin brass pin but any suitable pointy tool (jewelers flat-head screwdriver of tiny size) should work. While applying gently lateral pressure to the safety drum/lever, ease the conical part into the tunnel and you should be greeted with a satisfying double "click" as the safety drum/lever snaps home. Voila! Slide back together! A few drops of lubricant followed by a few cycles of the safety de-cocker and you can put your PPK back together with proud confidence.

-Pilotsteve
 

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Discussion Starter #26
UPDATE: Range report after deep-cleaning the slide.

Hello my friends. I finally had a chance to go to the range yesterday and test-fire my PPK after having taken the slide completely apart and cleaning all the gunk out of the spring channels. First, I wanted to make sure everything worked OK (i.e. I put it back together right) and second, if the problem with the safety lever flipping itself on while firing went away.

It was weird. On the very first round, the safety lever flipped itself partially down. I flipped it back up and finished the magazine off with no problems. And that was it! A hundred and fifty rounds went through the PPK without a single problem! Not one jam, not one misfire, not one naughty instance of the safety flipping back on. Problem solved, PPK works like a charm, and Pilotsteve is super happy! Thanks to all of you who helped guide me through this little issue. Without your help I probably would have found myself at a gunsmith peeling Benjamins out of my wallet.

-Pilotsteve

p.s. the Critical Defense rounds worked perfectly and flawlessly as well. Holy smokes... those are some wicked rounds!
 

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"p.s. the Critical Defense rounds worked perfectly and flawlessly as well. Holy smokes... those are some wicked rounds!" (original quote by Pilotsteve)

+1
IMHO, one of the best 9x17mm defensive cartridge currently on the market.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Video of Critical Defense testing.

I just retrieved and posted a video clip I took with my camera while shooting yesterday for you. I shot this clip of me testing the Critical Defense rounds in carry configuration. A round in the chamber with safety on, a full magazine, and a double-action first shot. Ha ha you can even see me almost accidentally pull the hammer back before I remembered to try it double action. :)

I shifted firing positions to simulate re-tracking the target. It's surprising to me how easy my Interarms PPK trigger pull is in double action - only a few pounds it seems. Look how effortless it is. After the first pull (single action thereafter), the trigger is the sweetest thing I've ever shot. Very light, crisp, and sure. What a fantastic pistol... I love it!

Enjoy:


-Pilotsteve
 

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Searcher on sticky

Searcher ,,wouldn't this be a perfect sticky, a bunch of ppk problems put together with the fix solutions with them ? I had Steve's problem several weeks ago with my ppk/s Interarms 380 and I shot gun cleaner down the extractor tunnel and blew it out with air. I haven't shot it again yet to see if that fixed it.

Steve did a great job explaining his cleaning procedure & I guess that wiil be my next job if the blow out didn't work.

On the one sticky you could put spring info ,& alot of the problems that have been reviewed here. This is really a great forum.
Gene
 

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Done ... and a good suggestion, Gene. Thanks for the excellent idea. All we have to do is jiggle the title a bit to make it work as a collection point for ailments -- and solutions.
 

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Thanks to Steve for starting the thread & Tanfoglio's videos, it took me about 30 minutes to strip & clean my slide that had given me the same trouble as Steve's.
Gene
 

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This is for Mike or any one else who can answer it. The ppk/s that I just cleaned in the last post, I shot today for the first time & the falling safety happened again twice in 50 rounds. The gun is nearly perfect & has been shot very little ( about 700 rounds). The safety is very easy to work, moreso than my other ppk's. I wondered if the extractor spring could be weak & not holding it up.

The gun is spotlessly clean and the ammo was Remington or Fiocchi fmj . It is an Interarms 380. The recoil spring also feels lighter than my other 380. I bought it from a friend who bought it new in about 1990. I shot it for about a year & put about 300 rounds thru it with no problems. This is one of the first problems I have had with ppk's in over 50 years. I have a similar problem with my PP 32 but I haven't shot it since I cleaned it so that will come later. Thanks Gene
 

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Discussion Starter #36
The safety is very easy to work, moreso than my other ppk's. I wondered if the extractor spring could be weak & not holding it up.
Yeah, Gene it sounds like it's getting to be time for a new set of springs for the old girl. In my case, the springs were tight and strong but the tunnel it hides in inside the slide was just plain nasty - filled with paste-ified carbon goop and sludge. Also, in the recess above the loaded chamber indicator pin was carbon buildup and nastiness worthy of song.

I've got some thousands of rounds through my PPK and never cleaned those hard-to-get-at places. If fact I don't really know if you can get in there without a complete slide teardown. But thanks to King Tanfoglio and others, the task is now clear to me and not daunting. This forum is an incredible resource and bounty of information for all Walther owners and enthusiasts. The best part is it continues to grow every day.

-Pilotsteve
 

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Steve,,, Thanks for the post but I did the complete take down of the slide like you did. It did help alot but I thought like you that the extractor spring might be a problem as the safety did work easier than my other ppk's. It is surprising as the gun has had very few rounds thru it , probably only 600 or so. I will let you know as I ordered Wolff springs for the whole gun yesterday. I will only change the extractor spring. Thanks Gene
 

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One more crack at this dead horse..

A few days ago, a user posted a question that I had hoped would get some answers so I wouldn't have to waste space on the board. Unfortunately, while there were some good answers it didn't answer my particular question:

Comparing the PPK/S .380 and the PPK .380 are there any more or fewer reported issues between the S and the standard PPK? I know several users commented that the .32 seems a bit better, but as a carry gun, I feel .380 is the minimum. The PPK has a slightly shorter barrel and thinner frame IIRC, so are there any functional differences?

Thanks everyone - and I realize that most people don't go out and buy a PPK and a PPK/S just to have them both (I could be wrong) :) but after having a so-so experience with my S&W PPK/S I'm really interested to hear if the standard S&W PPK tends to be slightly better.

Leaning towards the PPK this time as CCW is now signed into law and I prefer a pocket compact over a medium frame .357. :D

I guess if there are still doubts with the PPK, I'd be looking into a Sig 232, or a Bersa..
 

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We have only incidental evidence that the S&W-made PPK in .32 is any better than the S&W-made .380 PPK/S. There is no real evidence to support this conclusion -- only fewer reports of problems. You will have better luck with an Interarms-made pistol, or with one of the German- and French-made models.
 
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