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Knowing my weakness for .32s, GeoNole84 told me about a rare Bernadelli .32 being offered on gunbroker. I checked it out but it was bid up beyond the price I was willing to pay. Along the way I stumbled on this gun, and won it for cheap money. In my defense it IS a .32.

It is a nickel plated six-shot top break revolver chambered in .32 S&W with a 3-1/4” barrel. The seller, Ancestry Arms, dated it to the early 20th Century. The only marks on the gun are the serial number on the butt and an inscription along the top of the barrel.

The operation is unusual compared to other revolvers I have seen in that once fired the hammer stays down with the firing pin exposed, and the cylinder is locked. When cocking the hammer back to the first notch the firing fan disappears and the cylinder is free wheeling. When the hammer is fully cocked the cylinder is once again locked. Everything aligns properly and the action seems to have no play.

I did find some data on guns made by the American Arms Company but not that describe this particular gun. I have attached some photos to peruse. Any information would be appreciated.




gonzo, SoCenPA. "Before all else, be armed." --Niccolo Machiavelli
**ISO P.38 ac42 mag 4848b, and PPK mag 285129K/2**
 

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Gonzo,

it looks a lot like the H&R or Iver Johnson revolvers that I had bought by the shoe box in the 1990s. Can you do a search for the patent number? It might be made under patent of someone else and give you a lead.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Gonzo,



it looks a lot like the H&R or Iver Johnson revolvers that I had bought by the shoe box in the 1990s. Can you do a search for the patent number? It might be made under patent of someone else and give you a lead.
It is labeled American Arms Co and I found a bit about the four iterations of the company before Marlin bought the assets. But I can’t find anything specific on this model because it is a six-shot and does not have a side plate to reach the lockwork. I have learned that most top breaks of the period did not have rebounding hammers.

Still seeking. I’ll take a stab at the patent search.


gonzo, SoCenPA. "Before all else, be armed." --Niccolo Machiavelli
**ISO P.38 ac42 mag 4848b, and PPK mag 285129K/2**
 

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A lot of the old revos were copies of Smiths, with or without the benefit of permission. The workmanship, even on the cheaper ones, is actually pretty amazing.
Our late Range Officer had a ton of old ones not even blessed with serial numbers.
Moon
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Found two of the patent documents. Provides insight into the internals. I settled for a Ballistol bath followed by some judicious air pressure; ibe had adventures with flat springs before and do not see the need to disassemble, it really looks clean and basically unused. A local ‘smith had a box of ammo and agrees it won’t hurt to shoot it a little.


gonzo, SoCenPA. "Before all else, be armed." --Niccolo Machiavelli
**ISO P.38 ac42 mag 4848b, and PPK mag 285129K/2**
 

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Yes, a common design.



gonzo, SoCenPA. "Before all else, be armed." --Niccolo Machiavelli
**ISO P.38 ac42 mag 4848b, and PPK mag 285129K/2**
Gonzo,

is the the patent in the name of American Arms Co. or is the patent held by someone else? Is there a big technical difference to an H&R?
 
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