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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all. Long time lurker, first time poster. I was going through my Grandpa’s safe and found this gem. Through my research on the forum and google it seems to be a PP I believe from 1945 when they did not stamp slides toward the end of the war.

What would be the value of this firearm? I have had a PP on the wishlist for sometime but I am wondering if I should even fire this one.

Serial numbers do match on slide and frame. See attached photos. Gun is not blued.
 

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1945 seems to be correct.


Dieter: Mag housing seems to be time correct (7,65 m/m), but extension seems to be post war.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The finish does seem to be nickel but I am not sure. I have seen these referred to as “white guns” that were never blued when liberated from the walther factory.

I have also read that many of these that do not have any proof marks or stamps usually do not have matching serials for the frame and slide. I honestly thought it was a clone until I googled the serial.

Unfortunately, I do not have any info on this firearm nor does my father. The serial is 388182 P (AC marked underneath) on both the slide and frame.
 

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it appears nickel plated to me. For sure, it is not bare steel aka "in the white".
 

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it appears nickel plated to me. For sure, it is not bare steel aka "in the white".
Yes you are correct. Sorry I know nothing about these PP pistols. I just recently have gotten into Walthers in the past couple years (P99 & PPS). Would the nickel plating hurt the value? I would never sell it either way but I am curious.
 

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Nothing to apologize for- this is how we all learn! Yes, plating does affect value, but a late-war make is a wonderful family heirloom, it is sad you didn't get the story from your grandfather. As far as the plating, it is now a part of this gun's history, although often the process buffed and removed most smaller proofs and acceptance marks. Some recognize it as such, others see a non-original refinishing job done to it, for which there is no restoration. It was in the fashion of the times and the ones who survived to bring them back got to do what they wanted to with them.


As far as firing it, let a Walther-competent gunsmith inspect it first. Had a Tokarev to which this was done years back, they even plated the springs. You never know.
 
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