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Perhaps somebody can help me with this: I read somewhere and forgot to make a note that a major police agency in this country was issued the S&W99 (could it have been North Carolina?) as a duty pistol. I also heard they had considerable problems with them.

Was this really an issued weapon for N.C. State Police, or did I imagine that?

If true, did they have a lot of problems with their S&Ws?

I am guessing that they now use another kind of pistol since I don't know how old this information is (if it is real). Just out of curiosity, does anybody know what the NCSP uses these days?
 

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let me digg for a post that I replied to on the TFL forum way back. The only reason I registered over there was due to that post....
 

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From this thread:

http://forums.officer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=9974

Malfunctions force State Police to recall newly issued weapons
The Associated Press
3/15/01 4:02 AM


NEWARK, N.J. (AP) -- The state police have recalled the new pistols they recently began issuing to troopers after the weapons started jamming and malfunctioning during training exercises.

State Police Superintendent Carson Dunbar and acting Gov. Donald T. DiFrancesco announced the recall of the 9 mm Smith & Wessons on Wednesday. The state is spending $2.1 million for 2,600 guns.

State Police officials also said they have filed a formal complaint with the state Treasury Department over the contract with the Massachusetts-based gun manufacturer.

Smith & Wesson technicians, working with state police gun experts, have been unable to determine whether the problem is related to the firearm itself or the way it is fired by the troopers.

The new weapons had been issued to about 500 detectives and officers on road patrols. They will go back to using their old 9 mm Heckler & Koch guns until the problem is resolved, State Police spokesman John Hagerty said Wednesday.

Troopers noticed the problem during training sessions with the new weapon in early February. They fired each weapon more than 300 times at various distances and also practiced loading and reloading.

"There were enough malfunctions during the transition that it raised serious concerns among the union members," Chris Burgos, first vice president of the State Police Fraternal Association, told The Star-Ledger of Newark for Thursday's editions.
 

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I'm old and senile :) but, IIRC, S&W took the weapons back and resold them to the public.

They hired an indepentant contractor to test the pistols. The contractor found the pistols to be 98.5% reliable.

S&W felt this was an acceptable number and resold the pistols.:eek:


Dave
 

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I think you are right.... and I think these were sold @ CDNN.... though that must have been before my time as I never have seen any of them in person
but there was some recent "NJ" marked mags that were sold on this Forum if I remember correctly
 

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My understanding of the NJ fiasco was the NJSP had SW redsign the pistol so that it had no decocker and thus no way to decock the striker after it was loaded. So basically, you had a SA pistol with no manual safety and the pistol had to be unloaded to be made safe.
 

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Here you go.

During the course of selecting the S&W Model 99, a design that is actually the product of a joint effort between S&W and Walther, there were some modifications initially made to the gun at the request of the state police agency. Leisinger confirmed that the decocker was first deleted, then put back, when concerns arose about accidental discharges.

Decocker Decision
"They submitted the gun without the decocker," he recalled. "Then that became single-action-only. And then when we discovered with the decocker you can take the gun down without pulling the trigger, we wanted the decocker put (back) on. Down the road, somebody was possibly going to shoot somebody." He portrayed the initial concern as trying to eliminate levers that might project from the pistol and interfere with its operation. Decocker levers do project varying distances from other gun models, though Gun Week has not found any indication that these have ever posed serious problems. What makes the Model 99 S&W different is that the decocker is not a traditional "lever," but designed more like a "plunger/button" on the top left of the slide. It profiles quite well with the slide surface. Gun Week visited a gun shop and, with the help of a shop employee, tested various ways to make the pistol accidentally lock open during cycling (arguably possible by pressing up on the slide stop with the left-hand thumb during right-hand firing), but could not find a way to accidentally engage the decocker. Magazine capacity was changed from the original 16 rounds on the test guns to 15 rounds on the duty weapons. Leisinger said some of the duty guns were experiencing failures to feed, with the round nosing down and jamming against the feed ramp.
From Gunweek.
So, apparently they didn't know anything about the SW99 even after their lengthy selection process.
 
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