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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All,
Looking at buying a 22 rifle for plinking at the 75 yrd-ish range, something different than handguns.
The Ruger 10/22 gets very good marks, reviews, feedback, cost etc.

I've come to this group for any thoughts or knowledge on this gun in particular or Ruger in other weapons. I hesitate to go to a Ruger forum or site as there the information might be biased. Hoping for some un-varnished truth here.

Also if anyone has a RECOMMENDATION for another .22 rifle in a different brand would be happy for that too. Looking for rifle under $300 and then add a scope.

Any hel
 

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I have some very definite thoughts on the 10/22 having purchased one for plinking with my children about 2 years ago. I also own the Ruger American Rimfire in 22LR. First, Ruger's CS is top notch. They are a solid company that stands behind their products, period. Second, neither weapon has had a single hiccup or problem from unboxing to modifying and shooting.

Now, the difference between the two is obvious - semi-auto vs bolt. For my kids the 10/22 was fun but they rushed and played pull the trigger as fast as you can, which irritated me and resulted in many ....discussions. The American Rimfire fixed all that nonsense. Both my son and daughter loved the 10/22 and resisted the American Rimfire at first. Once they took the bolt gun to the range and realized that they could actually learn and come to master the weapon, not just pray and spray they REALLY came to love that bolt gun. Now, when I ask them - which one do you take to the range today? they each answer the Ruger bolt gun! Each of them have become MUCH better riflemen because of that little bolt action rifle.

If you decide you want the 10/22, which is a fine weapon and I have NOTHING against it. I would recommend you consider several options: take-down makes it much more storable and portable IMHO; stainless steel lowers maintenance; upgraded trigger group improves the rifle a good bit and the Ruger model can be had for around $50; add a rail to the top using the pre-drilled holes as that makes swapping between scope, sight, etc., MUCH easier; CDNN has a combination offer of the Ruger 10/22 lazer AND 25 round magazine for <$30 and its a steal.

Hope you enjoy your 22 plinker and let us know what you decide on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
PPS1980, thanks for the long and thoughtful write up. I keep getting endorsements like this so can't imagine I will go for something else. The RUger just keeps getting solid endorsements from many on multiple sites. TY
 
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The Ruger 10/22 is a fantastic choice for an affordable, RELIABLE, and very customizable .22 rifle. You really can't go wrong with either the standard carbine or the takedown models. I have a new production standard carbine with synthetic stock and blued finish, but I grew up shooting an older wood/blued carbine model my dad had. An excellent rifle in terms of price, parts availability, ability to modify, and durability.



I agree with PPS that a bolt .22 is best for learning a rifle platform and/or teaching kids or new shooters the fundamentals of shooting. If this is your first rifle, I would argue that a bolt action .22 is probably the smartest option as I personally believe they are the type of action that should be learned on first. You may want to look at some offerings from CZ as they make a pretty nice quality little bolt .22 rifle as well. Also, bolt rifles are just as much fun, more reliable, and potentially more accurate as well when bench rested with a nice optic. A 10/22 is a quirky sort of rifle in that its controls are a bit odd compared to most semi-auto rifles, which makes it a somewhat difficult platform for new shooters to learn on. Many of those annoyances can be easily modified and/or eliminated.



Probably the best thing about a 10/22 though is you can make it whatever you want. There are literally endless options for stocks, sights (the stock irons are a bit difficult to get used to), red dots, barrels, trigger enhancements, whatever you can think of. 10/22s also very reliable for a semi-auto .22 rifle and the availability of both standard and higher cap mags like the Ruger BX-25 really allows you to have some fun shooting a lot with this rifle for not a lot money. They are also very reliable in my experience. I can recall maybe 5 times my 10/22 has jammed and that was when I was using super cheap bulk stuff. That is after at least 1000+ rounds after about 2.5 years of ownership and general cleaning and maintenance.
 

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I might add that with HV 22LR it is very reliable. I also got the model with threads and have a suppressor in 22lr for it. Put subsonic rounds in it with the suppressor and its very quiet but also has to be hand cycled. Come to that I prefer the bolt action with suppressor because I already know I'll have to hand cycle it. 22 suppressors make plinking even easier IMHO and are cheap. My current favorite ammo for the 10/22 is Aguila Super Extra HV Copper plated 40gr.

When I did all the research on the 10/22 a couple years ago I decided on the following list of specs:

  • Take-down
  • Stainless Steel
  • Threaded
  • Scope base pre-drilled
The model 11125 was the sweet spot for me with the 10/22. Very nice little weapon. Breaks down easily, holds zero when reassembled, and stores in a small backpack.

As Mogg said - flush fit 10 round, BX15, Bx25 and the new double 25 round magazines are plentiful and convenient. I'd stay away from the non-Ruger magazines. Sure, you can save ~40% up front but they just don't feed consistently in my experience.
 

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I bought a standard 10-22 to teach my son when he turned 9 and it's a great plinker. The nice thing about the platform is that it's pretty modular. The stock, stock was a little too long for him and I was able to find a smaller factory stock on eBay for a great price.

Paired with a $50 scope it's a tack driver at 25-50 yards, it gets a little bit more challenging 100+ yards out with the 22lr round but it's fun.

I wish I opted for the takedown because it would have made range trips easier but we've been happy with it.

The only downside is cleaning it, specially reassembly, some days I can get the charging handle and bolt back in the receiver on the first try, other times it has me cursing.
 
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