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For your RSA, you should get about 10,000 rounds out of it if you aren't running a lot of +P ammo through it. Some people change them around 5000 rounds just for the sake of preventing excessive wear on the frame from the battering.

I would recommend that you log your round counts, and if you start to notice any differences in how it feeds, such as rounds hanging up before the slide goes all the way into battery, or if you can feel the recoil becoming snappier than usual, you'll need to change the recoil spring.

I was initially unaware of the recommended round count for the recoil spring in my Sig P938 when I first got it, and when I exceeded that number, my trigger finger was getting battered on the trigger guard to the point that I developed a blood blister to the right side of the finger nail after a 300-round range session. The trigger guard on the PPQ is much bigger, so you'll probably notice snappier recoil in a different way. For me, my trigger finger drags the bottom of the trigger guard on my P938 and my Glocks because my hands and fingers are a little on the bigger side.

As far as the round count for your magazines goes, you will probably be wearing out other parts on your pistol before that goes, especially if you have multiple magazines.
 

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When my Q5 got to around 6000 round, I noticed the ejected cases were traveling about nine feet, as opposed to around 6 feet when new. I installed a new RSA and that brought it back down.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you for replying. For some reason Walther recommends rotating the mags every month which is why I'm asking about the mag springs. They don't have a recommended round count for the RSA, just to replace it when you start to have problems. Which is a bit too nebulous for me.........Thanks again.
 

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That recommendation on monthly magazine rotation may have something to do with the idea that leaving them compressed will weaken the springs. Springs actually weaken from compression and decompression--not just from compression. Of course, that is contingent upon the springs being comprised of quality material that is designed for the amount of compression to which they'll be subjected.

I remember my first trip downrange in '03 and having rounds fall out of my M-9 magazines because the springs had weakened in only a few weeks. That became a common complaint amongst people assigned M-9s, and the DoD switched to a different manufacturer. I didn't have the same problems with the magazines during either of my later deployments. The bottom line is that the steel used for those springs was not designed to maintain its structural integrity when compressed to the point that the springs had to be compressed for a fully loaded magazine.

Walther makes higher quality magazines than that, so you won't have springs weakening on you. With that being said, rotating the magazines is a good way to ensure that you don't get gunk built up in them. It is not uncommon to have a lot of dust an other stuff accumulate in your carry magazines, and when you do the rotation process, you forestall that accumulation.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That recommendation on monthly magazine rotation may have something to do with the idea that leaving them compressed will weaken the springs. Springs actually weaken from compression and decompression--not just from compression. Of course, that is contingent upon the springs being comprised of quality material that is designed for the amount of compression to which they'll be subjected.

I remember my first trip downrange in '03 and having rounds fall out of my M-9 magazines because the springs had weakened in only a few weeks. That became a common complaint amongst people assigned M-9s, and the DoD switched to a different manufacturer. I didn't have the same problems with the magazines during either of my later deployments. The bottom line is that the steel used for those springs was not designed to maintain its structural integrity when compressed to the point that the springs had to be compressed for a fully loaded magazine.

Walther makes higher quality magazines than that, so you won't have springs weakening on you. With that being said, rotating the magazines is a good way to ensure that you don't get gunk built up in them. It is not uncommon to have a lot of dust an other stuff accumulate in your carry magazines, and when you do the rotation process, you forestall that accumulation.
Back in the day I used to leave my 92fs mags loaded all the time without worry, so I'm guessing Uncle Sam must have found a really good deal on spring steel that was not heat treated properly. This is another reason why I won't work for the Gov. The only companies that recommend rotating the mags often that I'm aware of is Walther and HK.
Thanks for the reply, and your service.
 
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