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Are there any authentic reports of a round being discharged upon decocking? I, of course, am careful when I decock not to point the gun at anything I would not want to hit, but since I often decock in my house before holstering my gun, I wonder if I need to realistically take additional precautions.

Ron
 

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I've never heard of it happening.

Note that the firing pin safety block stays in place until the trigger is pulled, disengaging it - decocking doesn't move the pin safety. While the striker is released to pop forward, it's still blocked by the pin safety.

thorn
 

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With a P99, no as stated above, unless you are near a big enough magnet to disengage the firing pin safety. There is one documented case of this happening to a police officer's 1911 when he walked into an MRI scan room without being disarmed.

There are some models out there though that can play tricks on you if you don't handle them right.

Sigs for instance: If you use the decocking lever, you're fine. If you treat it like a revolver and decock it by pulling the trigger and lowering the hammer slowly, the transfer bar is left ready to fire and a good smack on the back end will fire the gun.
 

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I haven't heard of that from any decocking firearm. If you know of any forums that have stated that please let me know as I would like to see them.
The cz-52 is known for parts wear turning the decocker into another trigger. Its design is quite different from the walthers though. I wouldn't worry about decocking the p99 and have heard no reports of it firing when decocked. It certainly never hurts to push buttons on your gun with the muzzle pointed into a 5 gallon bucket of sand though.
 

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If you treat it like a revolver and decock it by pulling the trigger and lowering the hammer slowly, the transfer bar is left ready to fire and a good smack on the back end will fire the gun.
Hello,

Actually, there is a much safer way to de-cock a revolver. The correct procedure is to place your thumb between the cocked hammer and frame first as a safety. Then, just as you start to lower the hammer with your thumb still blocking the hammer, you release the trigger so the hammer block can move back into place.

Once your finger is off the trigger, you can remove your thumb and safely lower the hammer.

In my first CCW class over a decade ago, the instructor pointed a revolver up placed a pencil in the barrel and slowly dropped the hammer with the trigger pulled. We could all see that pencil jump as the hammer was gently lowered onto the firing pin. He pointed out that this is a common source of Accidental Discharge (or Negligent Discharge) :)
 

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Thanks for the suggestion. I will set that up just to put my mind at ease.
Some people are even known to stick a fake plant in a large pot to make their bullet trap look a little more acceptable indoors. Others are known to use a very crowded bookshelf. Some places sell scraps of old kevlar vests. If you get creative you can have something to give you a little more peace of mind at home.
 

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Yeah, please inform us if anyone finds any reports of decock-discharge. I decock with my right thumb while being a righthanded shooter I wish not to loose the thumb.....might need it from time to time. Come to think of it, how would you safely activate a firearm with out a thumb? Besides being ambi?
 

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About sixteen other things can happen, and not just with wartime P.38s, that can produce an AD during operation of a decocking lever. Many of them have happened at least once. PP-series Walthers have had their share, but so have other makes. A common source of such problems is wear (particularly from dry firing), breakage or sticking of small parts that goes unnoticed, and replacement of safety or decocker-related components by people who don't follow the proper procedures. In most Walther designs before the P99, tolerance stackups were resolved by the selective fitting of the decocking lever, which has to be timed just right. All of this merely emphasizes the importance of keeping the muzzle pointed in a safe direction when operating any control other than the trigger. It is also a good reason to restrain the hammer by hand when operating the decocking lever to ease the hammer down rather than just letting it snap forward.

M
 

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I completely agee with all of Mike's post.

I dont believe my P99 will discharge when it's decocked, as the design prevents the pin from hitting the primer. Then again, I'm always careful of where the muzzle is pointed. If it DID go off, I'd be suprised buy no real harm done to my family nor property.

thorn
 
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