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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone use Rem Dri Lube on their P99? I have been using Hoppes gun oil, but I don't like how it attracts dust. The dri lube dries and doesn't get gunky, but I don't know how well it lubricates. I'm not too worried about rust or corrosion, my guns are kept inside and used frequently, but I want to make sure I'm lubing all the parts. Thanks.
 

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I haven’t used the “dri Lube” type of lubrication………so I won’t say it is bad or good for semi-Auto actions.

What I can offer you is the name of a lube that I use and found to work extremely well in semi-auto pistols “ GunSlick” Graphite grease.

The most important job of a lube in a semi-auto……is to keep the rail system well lubricated , you may have heard the phrase “ you should never let your semi-auto go “dry” “ This dry state is perhaps the leading cause of jams. Now this phrase “Dry” does not mean you can’t use a dry type lube……it just means not to let your gun deteriorate
To the point where the lubrication has lost effect .

I have found that GunSlick will keep the rails lubricated for months [ without use ]. I have put away some semi-autos in the safe for 5 months and when examined….the rails looked like the day I applied the gunslick. Now you might not want to use this type of lubrication in high sandy areas [ beach ], where this type of debris will collect on the lube. That would be a perfect place to use the dri lube or pure graphite.. Also extreme cold { below 0 degrees } might call for a Dry type lube.

I have bet my life on the use of Gunslick…………..and I will continue to do so. I use “Break-Free” Automatic lube for all other parts besides the rails. You might want to try the Gunslick graphite on your Pistol’s rails and see if you like its performance. But it is "gunky" -smile-

JF.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Dang, I guess I hit on the most boring subject ever. 50 views and only one reply! No strong opinions out there, I guess. Is that good or bad?
 

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I used a "dry" lube several years ago. I forget the brand.

I could never get it to spray lightly enough that it wouldn't cause binding in the slide movement after it "dried". I had more FTF, FTE, and stovepipes using it than if I didn't use anything. I eventually just threw the mostly full can away.

Again, I don't remember the brand, so I can't say for certain it was Remington, although it was in a green can.

I do like the idea of the graphite lube.

My current lube is Break Free...
 

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Question? I don't use any dry lube of graphite...I usually fire and clean my pistols, except for maybe one, about every other week. I simply wipe them down with regular gun oil after cleaning. Is this okay or should I follow some other procedure. I guess after using wheel guns for so long, old habits are hard to break...any suggestions? And does it really matter?
 

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I have not used a 'dry' lube. But want to point out that different models of pistol require different levels of lubrication, and the weather should also be a factor in your choice of lube. For example, a Glock 19 requires much less lube than, say, a Beretta Cougar 8000. Not that the Cougar is a lesser gun, but the rotating barrel mechanism simply needs more lube (grease) than the Glock's tilt-barrel mechanism. And if you are carrying in a rainy, damp environment, you should probably use a more viscous lube like TW-25B, since the thinner ones like traditional gun oil will be washed off after a comparatively short time. In freezing, but dry conditions, a 'dry' lube might be the best choice. I used to shoot a lot in cold-damp New England, but at the time I wasn't paying much attention to the different types of lubes out there and just used the oil that came with my Beretta 92FS, probably regular gun oil badged with the Beretta name. Worked fine.

I find that my Walther P99C needs very little lube. I have not had a jam or fail-to-feed, even running a couple hundred rounds through at the outdoor range in a light drizzle. A little CLP on the rails and a tiny amount of TW-25B on the trigger mechanism the and striker assembly in these conditions and I did not have to clean the pistol until I got home.

ciadst
 

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Jake--

Your cleaning and lubrication methods seem reasonable--
The key is that you lube your guns about every 2 weeks, which is good enough for the lighter weight gun oils.

I have told this true story before, But I will mention it again here:
I saw the United States Secret Service take a NIB Sig. P-226 and fired over 100,000 rounds through it without CLEANING or LUBRICATION. 8 hours a day--day after day-- they fired that gun only putting bullets in it. This was a torture test to see at what point this and 4 other guns would fail. The second place runner up failed at about 70,000 rds.
Can't remember the make of the runner up.

Now did the United States SS advise their agents [that were issued the Sig P-226] that all they had to do is put bullets in the gun for the rest of their career and do nothing else to the weapon. No...........but the tests they performed sure backed up the fact that they could.

I guess it comes down to......safety...... and doing everything possible to make sure the weapons works when needed.

If you are going to use your pistol for CCW.........and carry it IWB.........and maybe you don't lube this gun for several weeks......I would strongly urge the use of a Gunslick type lubrication. Something that does not dessipate in a few months.

Of course, your weapon might work fine without any lubrication [ like the above described P-226 ] but that thought remindes me of a an Old Dirty Harry movie where he says " Do you feel lucky ......., well do ya ! "

JF.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well, I answered my own question. I used Dri Lube on my P22 and had more problems in 30 rounds than I have had in the preiovus 1,000. I'm throwing the can away!
 
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