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In Cabela's catalog that have .40 Smith and Wesson Ammo in FMJ and CNL for $53 and $58 per 300 respectively. Does anybody know if they will they were down the barrel more than your average bullet? I haven't learned how to reload yet but I am interested in bullets without paying a lot of money.
 

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I haven't worried too much on that warranty; it's only one year (not Lifetime Warranty like some others).

In more than 1200 rnds, I've gone through a lot of bulk ammo, remanufactured LRN 9mm 124gr (local purchase); no problems.
I do, also, shoot a bunch of std off the shelf brand name stuff, including Wally World Winchester.

Walther would probably advise against personal reloads as well. I do not believe that stops owners from experimenting.
 

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-Using reloaded .40 S&W is asking for trouble. The brass is subjected to a lot of stress during the extraction process (subjecting the metal at the rim to fatigue). Glock and Browning specifically recommend against using reloads in this caliber. -Read the post regarding case-head separation if you need to have a reason to stay away from reloads. -The guy's gun was destroyed and he was lucky to escape injury.

As far as what others may try or do, that's their choice. It's their gun and they have to live with the consequences. Lots of people do questionable things. A guy I know from work has a .303 Enfield rifle that he takes out to the woods. People who have gone with him, told me that he sets up his target on rocks about 15 or 20 yards away and starts shooting, apparently without any thought of ricochets or a real backstop. There are others who do what he does, but it's an example I choose not to follow.

$50 for 300 reloaded rounds isn't a deal. You can get 500 rounds factory new for $90-$100 (shipping included). Look at www.ammoman.com -Since you're only talking about saving pennys per round, I don't think it's worth it to go for reloads. One of the guys I know runs a range and, although he sells reloads, he has two rules for himself: "Never shoot someone else's reloads and never use Wolf ammo."

Good luck

 

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I'm the guy who lost the gun to the case head seperation on the re-loads. I will never, ever use re-loaded .40 S&W again and strongly recomend against anyone else doing so.
1) The .40 S&W generates a lot of pressure which among other things causes the cases to bulge near the case head.
2) The resizing process removes this bulge and weakens the case.
3) Some brands of .40 S&W ammo are already weaker than others in the case head area.
4) There is no telling how many times a case has already been resized and reloaded.
5) Check Glock talk. This type of problem is not uncommon with .40 S&W reloads with a 180 gr bullet.

I was extremely lucky. I was unhurt and will be recieving a new gun. Don't take the chance. You don't save that much and the risk just aren't worth it.
 

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What 's the scoop on Wolf ammo ? I use it in my CZ-75 9mm .
Dr.Cop , who's picking-up the cost of your new gun ?
Vic
 

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-The thing with Wolf is that they use iron casings as well as iron core bullets from time to time. It's scrap iron melted down so it's cheap. Iron on steel isn't good for the barrel and it is horrible on the bullet traps. There's also a problem of it ricocheting. On top of all of that, the charges aren't consistent. The quality control for Wolf is poor. One guy at the range joked, "What do you expect from guys who are paid in Vodka?"

There have been three guns that were destroyed by Wolf Ammo on his range, so he forbids it being used. (I was there for one of them. It was a double charge.) He has gone as far as to have his personnel use a magnet on the ammo people bring in to make sure it has no iron. -Of course, others may have a different opinion / experience, but I'd say you're better off tossing the ammo and buying something that is better quality.

 

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I've been reloading for my .40 P99's for 3 years now and have never had a problem. However this is because I control what I'm doing. I don't load to the max and I use a 170 grain bullet, so my pressure is way down from maximum.

I've noticed that when my brass has had an end, my resizing die will actually cut into the brass. These get tossed immediately. I also only use the brass for 5 shootings, then it's tossed.

In my experience, PMC is the worst brass out there. It seems to be the culpret in all the kB's that I've heard about in P99's, thus I will not reload it. The best brass for reloading the .40 seems to be Federal, Starline and one other I can't think of right now. I am warry of Winchester brass also. I've seen some excessive bulges on some of my Winchester brass. Thus I usually get rid of it after 2 or 3 firings.
 

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Funny you should mention that, it was a PMC case that blew when I had my K-B. I, too, have been warned about Winchester brass.

I was contacted by the S & W service rep last week and advised that they were sending me a new gun. I was so flabergasted that I failed to ask for details. That and I was half afraid they would change their minds. Being a born cynic, I will not be fully at ease until I have the new gun in hand.
 
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