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I have pre and post war PP/PPK and PPK/s in 7.65. Does anyone know the bore diameters or have slugged their barrels particularly on the pre-war pistols. I have found bullets in .311, .312 and lead in .313. Any help would be appreciated. Not thrilled about driving lead through the bores.
 

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Typically I used .312 for all of my 32s in jacketed. Bore condition would vary greatly depending on use of course, so if you would like the best fit i'd recommend slugging it.
 

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jager, we're assuming here that you have access to different diameter sizing dies and cast your own lead bullets?
My personal experience when feeding four Rangers and two police turn-ins (I load for myself and a buddy) has been as follows:

Lyman calls for .309", which is too small for good accuracy. I went as high as .313" which was entirely too big, before standardizing on .310" for the guns involved.
This was determined by checking groups and keeping an eye open for pressure signs.
There was another problem with some brass; a standard resizing die was not allowing some cases to firmly grip the .310"bullet. The exact cause of the problem appears to be variance in case wall thickness, but rather than miking every damn case, I simply went to a Lee undersize sizing die, which made the problem go away. (The larger diameter bullets were another attempt at addressing the issue, but as noted, they were too large.)

Final load was as follows:
1.7 B'eye/75 gr RNL sized .310"/803fps/sd 10/es 40/Walther PPK/s. This load will hold in the bull of a B2 target at 50' offhand, and makes one raggedyass hole at 21'. A 2.0 grain load actually produced more consistent velocities, but was a max load; didn't want to run that hard.

My suggestion would be to start with either the .309" or .310" and see how it shoots; if you go bigger, be especially mindful of pressure signs.
Check your loaded rounds frequently for potential bullet 'push in'; you may have to revert to the undersize die.
Once these quirks were out of the way, the reloads have been an absolute ball to shoot.
Feel free to ask questions if needed.
Moon
 

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Not a lot there for the .32, Searcher, but I was unaware of it (just hadn't noticed, actually). I'll surely take a longer look in the future; reloading for the .380 PP series especially can be challenging, which is an euphemism for 'frustrating'.
I was blessed with a buddy who was very knowledgeable about reloading who showed me the ropes, and it's a course of action I'd recommend to anyone.
For the OP here, we're assuming you are an experienced guy due to the nature of your question.
Have we made any progress solving your problem?
Moon
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the info halfmoonclip. I do cast and have different sizing dies. I may go ahead and slug the barrels just to find out the exact diameter.
 

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How's your supply of pure lead? It'll make slugging the bore easier; do the older guns have an even number of grooves?.
If you'd rather not, try my advice above.
I'd love to know if you have the issues with the size of the case; let me know?
Thnx,
Moon
 

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Not a lot there for the .32, Searcher, but I was unaware of it (just hadn't noticed, actually). I'll surely take a longer look in the future; reloading for the .380 PP series especially can be challenging, which is an euphemism for 'frustrating'.
No worries, Moon. We haven't had all that many threads on reloading, and the ones that we have had haven't exactly caught fire. Maybe this one will?

Update: This thread seems to be gaining some traction; we'll elevate it to Sticky status and trust that, like the Energizer Bunny, it will keep going ... and going ... and going ...
 

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I'm interested in reloading for the .32. I reload most of the ammo I shoot. Got brass, bullets, dies and a conversion kit for my Dillon 550. Now I just have to find the time. Hmmm ...
 

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And may God forbid that you (or I) be one of those evil people who stockpile ammo by loading it when we have time or buying it when the prices are good...B. Hussein doesn't like us.
I'll try to live with the guilt and fire up the Dillon this afternoon; I've .45s to load. Let me add that the progressive press has been one of the great liberating things for handgunners; I started on a single stage, and you thought twice before shooting up a whole box of cartridges.
Moon
 

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No worries, Moon. We haven't had all that many threads on reloading, and the ones that we have had haven't exactly caught fire. Maybe this one will?
I'll try to make a practice of visiting; nice to see reloading addressed here.
Wonder how common reloading is in this day and age? It's my impression that a lot of the really high-volume 'tactical' guys buy their ammo.
Moon
 

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I see plenty of .223 and .40S&W brass left on the ground at my range. I think most of that is from those 'tactical' guys. So I pick it all up, reload the .223 and throw the .40 in the recycling bucket. I know several shooters with .40S&W pistols, but not one who reloads for it.
 

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I'll try to make a practice of visiting; nice to see reloading addressed here.
Wonder how common reloading is in this day and age? It's my impression that a lot of the really high-volume 'tactical' guys buy their ammo.
Moon
Moon, when we left your region (30+!) years ago, I left my .380 dies and gear to a pal. Now find it may be a good idea to start reloading again... what/whose reloading gear would be recommended? Budget, of course is of major consideration but we understand the difference between carp and salmon, too. Is there a "middle ground" of any efficacy?

This would be all for .380 auto (at the moment, anyway), would buy bullets not cast 'em. And we've been ferretting our brass as a "just in case" for a year now.
 

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DrE I also started with a single stage press and later got a Dillon progressive. It has served me well for 15 years. I would rate them as a good buy for the buck. Good luck. Dave
 

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Concur on mousegunner's endorsement of the Dillon press; mine has served me for thirty years, and it's been rebuilt several times. Dillon's customer service is absolutely first class. If you need parts or advice, they're on it, and they only charge you shipping on warranty stuff that won't fit in a business envelope.
I have the 550; from friends I've talked to who have them, the 650 is significantly faster loading but much harder to change calibers. Nothing wrong with Dillon dies (except cost), but Lee dies are excellent and reasonably priced. I'd avoid their presses, tho'.
Back to models; stick to the 550 unless you are going to load commercially. Dillon's presses aren't cheap, but they are well thought out and engineered. I'd be happy to correspond with you regarding some tricks I've picked up over the years, and what you need and what you don't. I could not go back to a single stage press after the progressive.
I've a buddy who casts bullets, but I've experienced high lead counts and do most of my shooting on an indoor range. Despite much improved ventilation recently, I haven't gone back to bare lead bullets. Check out Berry's plated bullets; they are significantly cheaper than FMJ, and the quality is quite good. I've only used their 9mm and .45 to date, but I've been entirely satisfied with their product.
This likely should have been over on Searcher's new category.
More if you need it,
Moon
 

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I use a Dillon 550 and 650. Can't say enough about their customer service. Another option would be the Dillon Square Deal B. If you're only loading one caliber, a carbide set is included in the price. Here's a link: Dillon Precision: Reloaders, Reloading Equipment, Bullet Reloading, Bullet Reloaders_

Also been using Berry bullets in 9mm and .45acp. No problem with those and they include shipping on orders over $75. Here's a link: Berry's Manufacturing ? Over 50 Styles of Plated Bullets

Unfortunately, they are not taking orders at this time as they are trying to catch up due to high demand.
 

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Good links, Andy, and the suggestion on the Square Deal. It's a bit of a bargain, but caliber conversions are the issue.

What in hell is going on with anything related to firearms. Feinswine isn't trying to ban bullets (yet). Glad to have some on hand.
Moon
 

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Yeah, that's the drawback with the Square Deal. The dies are specific to that press, though they do offer most of the standard pistol calibers. It would suit DrE for his .380, but if he has any 7.65 Walthers, Dillon doesn't offer a die set for that press. If he's thinking he may expand to other calibers, the 550 would be the best bet, IMHO. I have several friends with 550's and we lend each other conversion kits and toolheads as needed. That helps to cut down on the cost.
 

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All .380 ATM, BUT(!) there is this ~yen~ to acquire .32 PPK's too...

Looks like my beer fund just became re-purposed. To: The Doc's Dillon 550 Fund.

Thanks, guys... I think. :p

OH! and any and all contributions wiil be welcome. :rolleyes:
 

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I load .380 with Lee dies AND a Lee 4 hole turret press. I can crank out rounds almost as quickly as a progressive. But I guess I am not your typical reloader: I hand prep my brass - clean it, size it on the turret, length check/trim, deburr/chamfer, clean primer pockets and prime. Then I bell/charge, set projectile and taper crimp with Lee Factory Crimp die in progressive like steps on the turret press. I also weigh every powder load thrown by a Lee Perfect Powder Measure on a electronic milligram resolution scale to within a couple hundredths of a grain either way. (I reset the tare weight of the pan whenever I see it wander more than 1/10th of a grain or around every 20-50 rounds. I usually double check my OAL at this time as well;seldom if ever needs adjustment.) I can comfortably crank out 100 rds/hour like this.

For me anyway, I think this is the easiest, cheapest way for a new loader to get started. At first, you can use it like a single stage and then, with practice, work your way up to a quasi-progressive mode as I have described above. If I were a new reloader, I'd go on the Lee Precision website, go to their list of distributors and compare prices. I get most of my stuff from FS Reloading, but it does pay to shop around from time to time.

DocLarsen
 
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