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Discussion Starter #1
After my recent PPK/S range trip (which you can read about in the new mags/old guns thread) I field stripped the gun and found my brand new 20lb Wolff recoil spring stuck.

And I mean stuck.

Not, like, "wiggle-it-off-carefully" stuck. This was "stand-on-the-grip-and-pull as-hard-as-you-can-with-pliers" stuck.

I was able to free it. Though the spring did not survive the ordeal. Apparently, the end of the spring had wedged into the circular recess at the root of the barrel. I guess the recoil hammered it in there pretty good.

Anyone ever experience with a Wolff recoil spring? Or any other spring? Never experienced this with the stock spring (assuming the spring that came with the gun is "stock").
 

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Another victim of the 'if it ain't broke, let's fix it anyway' syndrome.
Resist the urge to be nice to your gun by hanging parts on it. :)
It takes a prodigious amount of shooting to wear out the recoil spring of modern guns. Most Walthers haven't seen that much.

Moon
 

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Did you try torquing the spring before trying to pull it off (either to reduce the OD of the last coil against the frame, or increase the ID against the barrel)?

If you did, and it still didn't come off, the spring was incorrectly ground on its OD. (Or maybe it wasn't ground at all, like it should have been.)

That's my objection to Wolff springs: they are rarely an exact duplicate dimensionally of an original. They have their place: when originals are simply unavailable.

M
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Did you try torquing the spring before trying to pull it off (either to reduce the OD of the last coil against the frame, or increase the ID against the barrel)?

If you did, and it still didn't come off, the spring was incorrectly ground on its OD. (Or maybe it wasn't ground at all, like it should have been.)

That's my objection to Wolff springs: they are rarely an exact duplicate dimensionally of an original. They have their place: when originals are simply unavailable.

M
I tried twisting it. It wouldn't budge.

I'd never seen the stock spring "embed" itself in the circular recess l like that. So, I just kinda figured there was something out of spec with this spring... so I gave no second thoughts on destroying it upon removal.

And I'd say you're right about the improper grinding; I compared the ends of the two springs, and I see no evidence of grinding at all, on the Wolff spring.
 

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Just had the same thing happen recently on a Ulm frame rebuild. The factory recoil springs that I had were from Interarms era production and they did get wedged as you described. Pulling and twisting on them is not an option. What I have to do for deep cleaning purposes is gently wedge it out with a flat head screwdriver near the area where it is wedged into the barrel hood.
 

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Call me crazy, but why bother removing the spring at all, if cleaning is the sole purpose?
Moon
 

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Find my older post about the same thing on my PPKS. Moon essentially gave me the same advice. Though my OCD self really wants to fix itIm resisting the urge and just clean around it. :)
 
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...

I compared the ends of the two springs, and I see no evidence of grinding at all, on the Wolff spring.
I don't see how Wolff could use the same diameter wire as Walther did, and NOT grind it --yet expect it to fit in the barrel boss counterbore.

Of course not all .380s have the counterbore-- it was omitted midway in Ranger's production as a cost-saver-- so unground springs will fit. But it reduces by a critical millimeter or two the available room for compression in recoil, and makes it a struggle to dismount the slide. A poor economy.

M

P.S. S&Ws were the worst, because they must have used slightly thicker wire, and didn't bother to close the rearmost coil, both of which aggravated the problem. As a result, when the slide was drawn fully to the rear with the trigger guard open, the spring went "solid" before there was enough clearance to lift the slide off. One had to distort the spring helically (i.e., forcibly staggering the coils) to dismount the slide. After a while the spring stayed distorted so the gun was more easily field-stripped, but it was not how Walther designed the spring to work. In my layman's opinion, it was lousy engineering by people who should have known better.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Honestly, I guess I didn't have to replace the spring. The gun worked reliably. I guess I just didn't like the idea of it becoming permanently affixed to the gun, with continued shooting.

But yes, "if it ain't broke don't fix it" reverberated through my conscience.
 

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Guys, been there, done that, have the t-shirt.
You just get hellbent to do something (mechanical), and what should have been easy bites you.

I spent a less than pleasant afternoon getting the starboard selector switch off a Scorpion carbine; it entailed a Dremel cutting wheel and many unChristian remarks. It should have been one screw out, one in, and done. But nooooooo.

Same for those recoil springs; know when to say when. :eek:
Moon
 
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